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Artificial intelligence can now make convincing images of buildings

#artificialintelligence

There is a new craze in town. Recently, designers have been typing prompts into a diffusion-based artificial intelligence (AI) platform and waiting for images of never-before-seen buildings, logos, products, and more to materialize within seconds. Platforms like Midjourney are built on data sets of billions of existing images scraped from the web. In this vast library, you will find pictures of buildings, birds, balloons, and beaks, so if a building in the shape of a bird with a beak made of balloons is something you are looking for, type it in and Midjourney will deliver. In less than a month of using AI, I have created 11,515 images.


Dodge just invented a nostalgic new 'vroom' sound for electric cars

Mashable

As the American carmaker Dodge slowly lowers the curtain on its current Charger and Challenger models over the next few years in favor of EV sports cars, the company is sacrificing some of the products most famous for producing big, dad-pleasing "vroom-vroom" sounds. But Dodge's latest concept vehicle, which rolled onto a stage Wednesday during a presentation by Dodge CEO Tim Kuniskis, might just be the solution to that problem. Every 21st-century kindergartener knows what sounds phones, clocks, and cars make: "None, none, and none." The tech world has eliminated many machine noises, for better or worse. In some cases, this is actually a safety problem.



How Robots Have Evolved

#artificialintelligence

Originally published on Towards AI the World's Leading AI and Technology News and Media Company. If you are building an AI-related product or service, we invite you to consider becoming an AI sponsor. At Towards AI, we help scale AI and technology startups. Let us help you unleash your technology to the masses. Robotics has come a long way in the past few decades.


Partnership Owlin and ApeVue - Owlin

#artificialintelligence

NEW YORK & AMSTERDAM – Owlin, the acclaimed AI-based news analytics platform, and ApeVue, the global leader in market-based pricing data for private stocks, today announced they will offer select insights across both of their data platforms to better service private capital markets customers. Through the partnership, ApeVue's daily pricing service will incorporate Owlin's news content on private companies, providing customers with another source of market context for ApeVue's unique dataset. Customers of Owlin's news analytics will receive daily pricing data on more than 100 unicorn-status companies, enhancing the robust market insights and risk metrics available through Owlin. "Our service has focused on private markets for many years, identifying real-time investment opportunity and risk through the global and local news. Adding ApeVue's ability to increase timeliness in the delivery of transparent pricing data on major private companies is a big win for Owlin's customer base, and fits within our one-stop-shop strategy for our product in this market," said Stefan Peekel, US CEO and Chief Growth Officer of Owlin.


The Automation Advantage in Retail Banking

#artificialintelligence

Editor's note: This is a guest article from our partner Bain & Company, a top global management consultancy based in Boston. The company advises business leaders on strategy, marketing, organization, operations, IT, and M&A across industries, including financial services. As more fintechs enter the market and consumer preferences shift, traditional retail banks face significant challenges in attracting and holding customers while remaining profitable. They must become more efficient, responsive, and innovative to keep up with fintechs and stay competitive with a generation of customers expecting always-on, always-available consumer-like banking experiences. Recently, my company, Bain & Company, surveyed retail banks.


Unravelling cell biology through artificial intelligence

#artificialintelligence

The AI algorithm was able to predict the presence and the location of nuclei in more than 8,000 cells. Scientists from the Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD) and the National University of Singapore and the Nanyang Technological University, Singapore have used artificial intelligence (AI) to demonstrate a correlation between cytoskeleton organisation and nuclear position. The study was recently published in PLOS. To ensure that the study's parameters would not be limited by human conceptualisation, they developed a unique generative algorithm to interpret the cytoskeleton of eukaryotic cells using qualitative data, without telling the system what it was observing and how to measure it. "We separated the information related to the nucleus and the fibres in independent databases of images, ensuring that there was not any information about the nucleus found in the images of the fibres, so that the system could not cheat. Then we trained the system to find the location of the nucleus using only information specific to fibres. To do so, the system had to take the qualitative data and figure out on its own if there was a relation between the organisation of the fibres and the position of the nucleus. This forced the programme to find the parameters defining the system, free from human interpretation and predefined concepts," Associate Professor Javier G. Fernandez explained.


Why kill 'Cult of the Lamb's' big boss when you can marry him instead?

Washington Post - Technology News

Apart from a trait that prevents him from dying of old age, The One Who Waits is just like any other follower you can recruit in the game's dungeons by defeating minibosses or indoctrinating lost souls. He ambles about the grounds, worships your effigy and attends sermons just like his brothers and sisters in Lamb. These cult management sim portions make up about half of the game, while the other half sees you fighting through procedurally generated dungeons, cutting down followers of false gods and gathering resources to keep your flock fed, healthy and pious.


Snap reportedly gives up on its selfie drone just four months after its debut

Engadget

It's been less than four months since Snap unveiled a selfie drone called Pixy, but it seems the company is already giving up on the device. CEO Evan Spiegel told employees that Snap is halting further work on Pixy amid a reprioritization of resources, according to The Wall Street Journal. The $250 drone can take off from and land in your hand. It has four preset flight paths and can capture photos and videos that you can transfer to and share on Snapchat. For now, at least, Pixy is still available to buy from Snap's website.


Don't worry, 'Diablo IV' won't be pay to win, Activision Blizzard says

Washington Post - Technology News

Blizzard has used "Diablo IV" as part of its legal defense against a burgeoning union effort at Blizzard Albany (known as Vicarious Visions before its acquisition). During a hearing with the National Labor Relations Board, lawyers representing Blizzard presented extensive documentation and assets from "Diablo IV's" development, a move that Blizzard Albany workers took issue with since the workers themselves cannot update their own portfolios for a job hunt until a game is finished and shipped. The lawyers also shared the names of quality assurance testers working on "Diablo IV" along with their respective cover letters, social media accounts and LinkedIn profiles, which workers feared might invite harassment from the public. For reasons unclear, Blizzard's lawyers argued that Blizzard Albany employees working on "World of Warcraft" or "Overwatch" should not get to vote in union elections while conceding that employees working on Diablo are entitled to suffrage.