Elon Musk and Mark Zuckerberg clash over the future of artificial intelligence

Los Angeles Times

Two of the technology industry's most powerful leaders are at odds when it comes to artificial intelligence. Facebook Chief Mark Zuckerberg on Sunday called Musk's dire warnings overblown and described himself as "optimistic." "People who are naysayers and try to drum up these doomsday scenarios -- I don't understand it," Zuckerberg said while taking questions via a Facebook Live broadcast. Musk's electric car company is using the technology to enhance self-driving features in its vehicles.


Use deep learning on data you already have

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Clean, labeled data requires data analysts with a combination of domain knowledge, and infrastructure engineers who can design and maintain robust data processing platforms. Looking toward narrow AI systems, much of the recent excitement involves systems that combine deep learning with additional techniques (reinforcement learning, probabilistic computing) and components (memory, knowledge, reasoning, and planning). Many current systems based on deep learning require big compute, big data, and big models. While researchers are seeking to build tools that are less dependent on large-scale pattern recognition, companies wanting to use deep learning as a machine learning technique can get started using tools that integrate with their existing big data platforms.


How Machines Make Sense of Big Data: an Introduction to Clustering Algorithms

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Repeat Step 1 by recalculating the distance matrix, but this time merge the Bottlenose & Risso's Dolphins into a single object with length 3.3m. Then, we repeat Step 1 -- recalculate the distance matrix, but now we've merged the Pilot & Killer Whales into a single object of length 7.0m. Then, we repeat Step 1 and compute a new distance matrix, having merged the Bottlenose & Risso's Dolphins with the Pilot & Killer Whales. Then, it's back to Step 1 -- compute the distance matrix, having merged the Humpback & Fin Whales.


Chinese facial recognition firm developing AI to predict crimes

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Chinese companies are developing new facial recognition systems that can help law enforcement identify criminals and even potentially predict crimes before they occur, according to a report by Shanghaiist. Xjera Labs, a Singaporean firm with offices in Shenzhen and Shanghai, has developed a surveillance facial recognition system that can identify individuals, cars and other objects with a 97 percent accuracy. Another facial recognition firm, Cloud Walk, is developing an AI system that is designed to predict the probability of a crime occurring, allowing law enforcement to stop the act from ever happening. In a video posted on the Financial Times' Facebook page, the crime-prediction technology relies on facial recognition and gait analysis to identify people from CCTV footage.


How Artificial Intelligence (AI) beat the best poker players in the world?

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"That was anticlimactic," Jason Les said with a smirk, getting up from his seat. Unlike nearly everyone else in Pittsburgh's Rivers Casino, Les had just played his last few hands against an artificially intelligent opponent on a computer screen. After his fellow players -- Daniel McAulay next to him and Jimmy Chou and Dong Kim in an office upstairs -- eventually did the same, they started to commiserate. The consensus: That AI was one hell of a poker player.


Do you trust China to be the world leader in AI (Artificial Intelligence)? Internet, Information Technology & e-Discovery Blog

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The New York Times reported that China "laid out a development plan on Thursday to become the world leader in A.I. by 2030, aiming to surpass its rivals technologically and build a domestic industry worth almost $150 billion." The July 20, 2017 report entitled "Beijing Wants A.I. to Be Made in China by 2030" included these details on the plan: In budget proposals, the Trump administration has suggested slashing resources for a number of agencies that have traditionally backed research in A.I.


Elon Musk and Mark Zuckerberg clash over the future of artificial intelligence

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Justin Chang reviews "War for the Planet of the Apes," directed by Matt Reeves and starring Andy Serkis, Woody Harrelson, Steve Zahn and Judy Greer. Justin Chang reviews "War for the Planet of the Apes," directed by Matt Reeves and starring Andy Serkis, Woody Harrelson, Steve Zahn and Judy Greer. Justin Chang reviews "War for the Planet of the Apes," directed by Matt Reeves and starring Andy Serkis, Woody Harrelson, Steve Zahn and Judy Greer. Justin Chang reviews "War for the Planet of the Apes," directed by Matt Reeves and starring Andy Serkis, Woody Harrelson, Steve Zahn and Judy Greer.


Elon Musk and Mark Zuckerberg clash over the future of artificial intelligence

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Justin Chang reviews "War for the Planet of the Apes," directed by Matt Reeves and starring Andy Serkis, Woody Harrelson, Steve Zahn and Judy Greer. Justin Chang reviews "War for the Planet of the Apes," directed by Matt Reeves and starring Andy Serkis, Woody Harrelson, Steve Zahn and Judy Greer. Justin Chang reviews "War for the Planet of the Apes," directed by Matt Reeves and starring Andy Serkis, Woody Harrelson, Steve Zahn and Judy Greer. Justin Chang reviews "War for the Planet of the Apes," directed by Matt Reeves and starring Andy Serkis, Woody Harrelson, Steve Zahn and Judy Greer.


Mark Zuckerberg Thinks Elon Musk's Views on Artificial Intelligence Are 'Pretty Irresponsible'

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Elon Musk and Mark Zuckerberg have some major things in common: They're both CEOs of prominent Silicon Valley companies, and both of those companies rely heavily on artificial intelligence. "If you can eliminate that with A.I., that is going to be just a dramatic improvement in people's lives." Earlier this month, Musk cited his closeness to A.I. Zuckerberg's Facebook has relied more and more on A.I.


AI Is Inventing Languages Humans Can't Understand. Should We Stop It? - Artificial Intelligence

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Because, again, we absolutely can lead machines to develop their own languages. "It's definitely possible, it's possible that [language] can be compressed, not just to save characters, but compressed to a form that it could express a sophisticated thought," says Batra . But as machines develop meanings, these symbols become "tokens"–they're imbued with rich meanings. But to a computer, what "A" can mean is so much bigger than what that "A" can mean to a person, because computers have no outright limit on processing power.