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AI can detect how lonely you are by analysing your speech

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Artificial intelligence (AI) can detect loneliness with 94 per cent accuracy from a person's speech, a new scientific paper reports. Researchers in the US used several AI tools, including IBM Watson, to analyse transcripts of older adults interviewed about feelings of loneliness. By analysing words, phrases, and gaps of silence during the interviews, the AI assessed loneliness symptoms nearly as accurately as loneliness questionnaires completed by the participants themselves, which can be biased. It revealed that lonely individuals tend to have longer responses to direct questions about loneliness, and express more sadness in their answers. 'Most studies use either a direct question of "how often do you feel lonely", which can lead to biased responses due to stigma associated with loneliness,' said senior author Ellen Lee at UC San Diego (UCSD) School of Medicine.


Spotlight Interview with Dr Thomas Sander from Idorsia Pharmaceuticals - Collaborative Drug Discovery Inc. (CDD)

#artificialintelligence

Dr. Sander kindly agreed to give us this interview at the Idorsia headquarters in Basel, Switzerland. Asking the questions from CDD are Neil Chapman and Mariana Vaschetto. By education I am organic chemist. During my seventh year at school we started to have chemistry classes and soon I had made up my mind to study chemistry. Four years later while still at school I had an opportunity to access the local University's Tectronix graphics computers.


Fossils: Doctor Who actor Tom Baker honoured by scientists who name a trilobite after him

Daily Mail - Science & tech

As Doctor Who, Tom Baker fought Daleks and Cybermen, robot mummies and gothic monsters -- but his latest'creature feature' has taken the form of an accolade. Australian palaeontologists have named a newly-found species of trilobite -- a segmented sea creature from 450 million years ago -- in honour of the actor. Trilobites loosely resemble woodlice -- and their closest living relatives include lobsters, crabs and scorpions. They fell extinct around 251.9 million years ago. The fossil -- 'Gravicalymene bakeri' -- was found preserved in shale rocks in Northern Tasmania that date back to the so-called'Late Ordovician' period.


Would AI and Machine Learning be that effective if stereotypes weren't there?

#artificialintelligence

We all are moving towards an era of Artificial Intelligence. Earlier when face recognition was something to be amazed at it is now easily implemented using existing libraries and frameworks. Machine learning is now embedded into our lives and it is thickening its grasp with time. Earlier it was a buzzword but now it is a reality that is making our lives easier and better. So let's talk about some of the problems with Machine Learning.


Regina Barzilay wins $1M Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence Squirrel AI award

AIHub

For more than 100 years Nobel Prizes have been given out annually to recognize breakthrough achievements in chemistry, literature, medicine, peace, and physics. As these disciplines undoubtedly continue to impact society, newer fields like artificial intelligence (AI) and robotics have also begun to profoundly reshape the world. In recognition of this, the world's largest AI society -- the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence (AAAI) -- announced yesterday the winner of their new Squirrel AI Award for Artificial Intelligence for the Benefit of Humanity, a $1 million award given to honor individuals whose work in the field has had a transformative impact on society. The recipient, Regina Barzilay, the Delta Electronics Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT and a member of MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL), is being recognized for her work developing machine learning models to develop antibiotics and other drugs, and to detect and diagnose breast cancer at early stages. In February, AAAI will officially present Barzilay with the award, which comes with an associated prize of $1 million provided by the online education company Squirrel AI. "Only world-renowned recognitions, such as the Association of Computing Machinery's A.M. Turing Award and the Nobel Prize, carry monetary rewards at the million-dollar level," says AAAI awards committee chair Yolanda Gil. "This award aims to be unique in recognizing the positive impact of artificial intelligence for humanity."


Regina Barzilay wins $1M Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence Squirrel AI award

#artificialintelligence

For more than 100 years Nobel Prizes have been given out annually to recognize breakthrough achievements in chemistry, literature, medicine, peace, and physics. As these disciplines undoubtedly continue to impact society, newer fields like artificial intelligence (AI) and robotics have also begun to profoundly reshape the world. In recognition of this, the world's largest AI society -- the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence (AAAI) -- announced today the winner of their new Squirrel AI Award for Artificial Intelligence for the Benefit of Humanity, a $1 million award given to honor individuals whose work in the field has had a transformative impact on society. The recipient, Regina Barzilay, the Delta Electronics Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT and a member of MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL), is being recognized for her work developing machine learning models to develop antibiotics and other drugs, and to detect and diagnose breast cancer at early stages. In February, AAAI will officially present Barzilay with the award, which comes with an associated prize of $1 million provided by the online education company Squirrel AI. "Only world-renowned recognitions, such as the Association of Computing Machinery's A.M. Turing Award and the Nobel Prize, carry monetary rewards at the million-dollar level," says AAAI awards committee chair Yolanda Gil.


Fran Allen

Communications of the ACM

Frances E. Allen, an American computer scientist, ACM Fellow, and the first female recipient of the ACM A.M. Turing Award (2006), passed away on Aug. 4, 2020--her 88th birthday--from complications of Alzheimer's disease. Allen was raised on a dairy farm in Peru, NY, without running water or electricity. She received a BS degree in mathematics from the New York State College for Teachers (now the State University of New York at Albany). Inspired by a beloved math teacher, and by the example of her mother, who had also been a grade-school teacher, Allen started teaching high school math. She needed a master's degree to be certified, so she enrolled in a mathematics master's program at the University of Michigan.


CryptoHarlem's Founder Warns Against 'Digital Stop and Frisk'

WIRED

This year, many people braved the risk of coronavirus infection to protest police brutality in Black neighborhoods, but physical violence isn't the only way law enforcement can harm marginalized and minority communities: Hacker Matt Mitchell wants us to pay attention to digital policing, too. He argues that marginalized communities have become a test bed for powerful and troubling new surveillance tools that could become more widespread. In 2013, Mitchell founded a series of free security workshops in his New York City neighborhood called CryptoHarlem as a way to work through the pain of watching the divisive trial over the death of Black Florida teen Trayvon Martin. "I talk to people about the surveillance in our neighborhood and how it got there and how it works and what we can do to circumvent it and what we can do to be safer," Mitchell said, in a video interview with WIRED's Sidney Fussell at the second of three WIRED25 events Wednesday. Society's growing dependence on digital platforms and infrastructure, combined with the events of 2020, have made his work more relevant than ever.


Breakthrough Days: The Urgency of Science + Collective Problem Solving - AI for Good Global Summit 2020

#artificialintelligence

Yoshua Bengio is recognized as one of the world's leading experts in artificial intelligence and a pioneer in deep learning. Since 1993, he has been a professor in the Department of Computer Science and Operational Research at the Université de Montréal. He is the founder and scientific director of Mila, the Quebec Institute of Artificial Intelligence, the world's largest university-based research group in deep learning. He is a member of the NeurIPS board and co-founder and general chair for the ICLR conference, as well as program director of the CIFAR program on Learning in Machines and Brains and is Fellow of the same institution. In 2018, Yoshua Bengio ranked as the computer scientist with the most new citations, worldwide, thanks to his many publications.


Mayo Clinic: AI and ML are 'complementary' to clinicians' skills, not a replacement

#artificialintelligence

The COVID-19 pandemic has dramatically altered the shape of healthcare around the country, including when it comes to priorities around incorporating artificial intelligence and machine learning into a system's landscape. But the need for clinical research has not slackened amid the crisis. In fact, the pandemic demonstrates how solid foundational work to implement AI and ML into workflows can be beneficial – and even crucial – both for solving short-term, urgent issues and for planning longer-term strategies. Experts at the Mayo Clinic say AI and ML are powerful tools for clinical research and care. "Rather than thinking of AI/ML in medicine as'man vs. machine,' we like to think of it as (wo)man with machine," said Dr. Tufia Haddad, a medical oncologist at the Mayo Clinic, in an interview with Healthcare IT News.