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The latest in humanoid robots: TALOS, Memmo & Humanoids 2020

#artificialintelligence

Last week we participated in The IEEE-RAS International Conference on Humanoid Robots (Humanoids) as Gold Sponsors. We took part in the workshops'Towards physical-social human-robot interaction,' and'TALOS: Status & Progress', as invited speakers, as well as offering a Virtual Tour of our legged robots including our latest projects, SOLO12 & Kangaroo. The IEEE-RAS International Conference on Humanoid Robots is the internationally recognized prime event of the humanoid robotics community. Established in 2000 and held annually, the Humanoids Conference is a forum for researchers working in the area of humanoid robots including mechatronics, control, perception, planning, learning, human-robot interaction, biomechanics, artificial intelligence, cognition, and neuroscience. Although this year's event took place virtually, PAL Robotics has previously taken part in Humanoids Conferences around the world, including in Toronto, and Beijing in recent years. At the event, we offered a Virtual Tour of all of our legged robots featuring our Humanoids Team: Sai Kishor, Adrià Roig, and Narcis Miguel.


China built the world's largest facial recognition system. Now, it's getting camera-shy.

Washington Post - Technology News

But Beijing has become alarmed at the growing power of Big Tech -- including the risk that personal information of senior officials could leak overseas -- and has moved this year to rein in China's Internet giants. This included derailing the IPO plans of mobile payment titan Ant Group, launching a probe into Didi Chuxing, the Chinese equivalent of Uber, and a ban on the country's lucrative online, for-profit tutoring services for students.


DDoS: Google has a new tool to defend against attacks launched by botnets

#artificialintelligence

Google Could have unveiled a public preview of Cloud Armor's Adaptive Protection -- a machine learning-powered method of detecting and protecting enterprise applications and services from Layer 7 DDoS attacks. It's the same technology that Google uses to provide Project Shield, a free service from Google parent Alphabet that protects human rights, government and media organizations against DDoS attacks. Cybersecurity certifications can help you get your foot in the door into what has fast become an industry with a high demand for skilled staff. Here is how to get started. Google in the past has blocked mind-blowingly large DDoS attacks, including one in 2017 that clocked in at 2.56Tbps that is pinned on a Beijing-backed attacker.


Google is using machine learning to stop DDoS attacks

ZDNet

Google Could has unveiled a public preview of Cloud Armor's Adaptive Protection – a machine learning-powered method of detecting and protecting enterprise applications and services from Layer 7 DDoS attacks. It's the same technology that Google uses to provide Project Shield, a free service from Google parent Alphabet that protects human rights, government and media organizations against DDoS attacks. Cybersecurity certifications can help you get your foot in the door into what has fast become an industry with a high demand for skilled staff. Here is how to get started. Google in the past has blocked mind-blowingly large DDoS attacks, including one in 2017 that clocked in at 2.56 Tbps that it pinned on a Beijing-backed attacker.


Wu Dao 2.0 - Bigger, Stronger, Faster AI From China

#artificialintelligence

It is no secret that China has COVID-19 under control. When you travel there you need to go through a 2-week hotel quarantine but once you are in the country, you are safe. Probably even safer than before COVID as wearing a mask is now part of the etiquette, and the many other viral respiratory diseases are likely to be on the decline. Hence, when I got invited to speak at the annual conference of the Beijing Academy of Artificial Intelligence (BAAI) in the AI for healthcare section, I readily accepted. The BAAI is a great platform for showcasing technology and talent across broad categories.


Pentagon Racing to Stay Ahead of China in Artificial Intelligence

#artificialintelligence

The Pentagon's self-described sprint to put together a more effective plan to confront and counter a rising China may be over, but the race to stay ahead of Beijing's aggressive advancements in artificial intelligence is far from done. That initial sprint culminated in June, months after the U.S. Defense Department's China Task Force recommended a series of internal, structural changes to ensure potential Chinese military threats did not escape notice or go unanswered. Other major initiatives remained classified, though U.S. Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin is making clear that maintaining U.S. dominance in artificial intelligence, or AI, will be key. "In the AI realm as in many others, we understand that China is our pacing challenge," Austin told a conference in Washington on Tuesday. "Beijing already talks about using AI for a range of missions, from surveillance to cyberattacks to autonomous weapons," he said.


China unveils robotic shark drone which uses AI to fire torpedoes at enemy ships

#artificialintelligence

Get email updates with the day's biggest stories China has built a shark drone to help it spy on and hunt down enemy ships and submarines. The stealthy sea robot can move at speeds of six knots and will help conduct reconnaissance as well as search and destroy missions for the country's military. Developed independently by Beijing-based Boya Gongdao Robot Technology, the unmanned device was unveiled at the 7th China Military Intelligent Technology Expo on Monday. And it has already been deployed for use by the forces. Most such drones can be fired out of a sub's torpedo tube, but it is unclear how the Robo-Shark will be launched. It's other functions include search and rescue, battlefield surveillance, hydrological survey, communications relay and underwater tracking missions, the Global Times reports.


The space race is back on – but who will win?

The Guardian

Liu Boming took in the dizzy view. Around him lay the inky vastness of space. Over the next seven hours Liu and his colleague Tang Hongbo carried out China's second spacewalk, helped along by a giant robotic arm. Mission accomplished, the two taikonauts – China's astronauts – clambered back into their home for the next three months: Beijing's new space station. The core module of the station, named Tiangong, meaning "heavenly palace", was launched in April.


A New Tool Shows How Google Results Vary Around the World

WIRED

Google's claim to "organize the world's information and make it universally accessible and useful" has earned it an aura of objectivity. Its dominance in search, and the disappearance of most competitors, make its lists of links appear still more canonical. An experimental new interface for Google Search aims to remove that mantle of neutrality. Search Atlas makes it easy to see how Google offers different responses to the same query on versions of its search engine offered in different parts of the world. The research project reveals how Google's service can reflect or amplify cultural differences or government preferences--such as whether Beijing's Tiananmen Square should be seen first as a sunny tourist attraction or the site of a lethal military crackdown on protesters.


Orwell's nightmare? Facial recognition for animals promises a farmyard revolution

#artificialintelligence

"We've been using it for sheep, pigs and cows," said Zhao Jinshi, who studied at Cornell University and founded Beijing Unitrace Tech, a company developing software for the agriculture industry. "For pigs, it's more difficult because pigs all look the same, but dairy cows are a bit special because they are black and white and have different shapes," Zhao said as he checked on the technology installed in a pilot project here at a farm in Hebei province, outside Beijing. China has led the world in developing facial recognition capabilities. There are almost 630 million facial recognition cameras in use in the country, for security purposes as well as for everyday conveniences like entering train stations and paying for goods in stores. But authorities also use the technology for sinister means, such as monitoring political dissidents and ethnic minorities.