Asia


UK-based energy tech startup wants to stop climate change with AI & blockchain

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Verv, the Google-mentored energy tech startup behind the smart energy hub and green electricity sharing platform, recently announced that it has raised over £6.5 million (€7.5 million) in its Series A round led by environmental fund Earthworm. Earthworm has invested £5 million in Verv's pioneering IoT and renewable energy trading technology that could drive down household electricity bills and carbon emissions by over 20%. Other investors in the round include European innovation engine for sustainable energy, InnoEnergy, Crowdcube and international energy and services company, Centrica. Earthworm's investment is an important backing of Verv's vision to make millions of homes more green with a global network of smart hubs that offer a real-time breakdown of key appliance use and spend, as well as enable the trading of domestic renewable energy between communities. At Earthworm we are driven by sustainability and Verv represents a brilliant example of'enabling' technology.


Is Artificial Intelligence Taking Over Military? Analytics Insight

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Artificial Intelligence (AI) has been omnipresent and the latest in the block is Military. In recent times, AI has become a critical part of modern warfare. Compared with the conventional systems, military establishments churning enormous volumes of data are capable to integrate AI on a more unified process. Ensuring operational efficiency, AI improves self-regulation, self-control and self-actuation of combat systems, credit to its inherent computing coupled with accurate decision-making capabilities. Taking into account the enormous capability Artificial intelligence (AI) holds in the modern-day warfare, many of the world's most powerful countries have increased their investments into military and self-security.


Facial recognition : 7 trends to watch (2019 review)

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Few biometric technologies are sparking the imagination quite like facial recognition. Equally, its arrival has prompted profound concerns and reactions. With artificial intelligence and the blockchain, face recognition certainly represents a significant digital challenge for all companies and organizations - and especially governments. In this dossier, you'll discover the 7 face recognition facts and trends that are set to shape the landscape in 2019. Let's jump right in .


Singapore talking with more electric car companies after Dyson, but Tesla apparently not among them

Japan Times >> News

LOS ANGELES - Following Dyson Ltd.'s plans late last year to manufacture its first electric car in Singapore, the city-state is now in talks with other makers of green vehicles to set up shop on the island. Singapore is pitching its connectivity to global markets through free-trade agreements, its high-skilled workforce and stringent protection of intellectual property, which is critical for the industry, according to the government agency set up to attract investments to the country. "Hopefully they won't be the only one we land," Chng Kai Fong, managing director of the Singapore Economic Development Board, said in an interview, referring to Dyson's plans. The whole idea is to build clusters." Bringing in other electric car manufacturers will create scale for the sector in Singapore, which is also spurring the development of autonomous vehicles in the country. The use of high-tech robotics and automation, as well as supply chain management and connectivity, could help dispel concerns on the high labor costs in Singapore. "It's much more of a capital game than a labor game," Chng said in San Francisco, where his agency hosted two technology-related conferences, including the Bridge Forum. "That plays to our strength." Dyson, the closely held manufacturer of hand dryers and vacuum cleaners, said in October it plans to complete its factory by 2020 with the goal of rolling out its first model by 2021 as part of a £2 billion ($2.6 billion) effort to expand into automobiles. Earlier this year, billionaire inventor James Dyson raised the stakes by announcing plans to relocate his company's head office to Singapore from the U.K. with the growing importance of Asia to its business. Singapore doesn't have a single car-manufacturing plant and is one of the costliest places in the world to buy an automobile. And not every electric carmaker is a fan. Elon Musk tweeted in January that Singapore has been unwelcoming to Tesla Inc., adding to his previous assertions that the government doesn't support electric vehicles. The billionaire chief executive officer was responding to a tweet inquiring why Tesla wasn't in the Southeast Asian nation. Musk had said in May that Tesla tried to bring its cars to Singapore but was unsuccessful because the government was "not supportive" of electric vehicles. Singapore is also getting pushback from some companies for introducing a carbon tax. The government says it's to help meet its Paris Agreement obligations, but it would also in turn drive up costs compared with other Asian markets. "Increasingly, carbon will be a constraint," Chng said. "But we have to do it.


Foreign staff bring new perspectives to smaller firms in Japan

The Japan Times

There's no denying that Japan, amid a severe labor crunch and a shrinking population, will need to rely more on foreign workers in the coming years, and that's especially true for small and midsize companies. Because of language issues and cultural differences, smaller firms often struggle to integrate foreign workers. But once they overcome those hurdles, many find that the addition of foreign perspectives can lead to new opportunities. Sakae Casting Co., a small aluminum cast manufacturer in Hachioji in western Tokyo, learned this the hard way. But its experience may be an example of what other firms will have to go through in the coming years.


From '12345' to 'blink182', the most hacked passwords revealed in warning over cyber-security

The Independent

Using easily guessed passwords across multiple accounts is a major gap in the online security habits of British people, a government study has found. The survey by the National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) found that many internet users did not know the best ways to protect themselves from cybercrime, with 42 per cent expecting to lose money to online fraud. Only 15 per cent of the survey's 2,500 respondents said they knew "a great deal" about how to protect themselves from harmful activity online, while fewer than half of respondents said they do not always use a strong, separate password for their main email account. We'll tell you what's true. You can form your own view.


Artificial Intelligence Enabled audience profiling in MoMAGIC

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"Sell the right product to the right customer" is a dream of every marketers and advertisers. As a leading digital marketing company in Asia, MoMAGIC is approaching this ultimate goal by launching two data-driven solutions: TrueReach and TrueInsight, which is capable of understanding and targeting audiences from both macroscopic and microscopic point of view. In this article, we will share the core ideas behind our solutions and some insights we learned when playing with large-scale real data. As the backbone of all MoMAGIC services, TrueInsight integrates large-scale, heterogeneous data sources (e.g., AD-request, web behaviors, etc.) and transforms those high-frequent, noisy dataflows into structured datasets. In order to complete those challenging tasks quickly and accurately, we first carefully designed the data processing pipelines of TrueInsight in a parallel and distributed manner to guarantee its performance scalability, which means TrueInsight can process large-scale data from multiple sources without scarifying its performance.


'Companies are seldom treated like this': how Huawei fought back

The Guardian

A pillar box red electric train connects Paris, Verona and Grenada via Budapest's Liberty Bridge and on to Heidelberg Castle in a 120-hectare fantasy business park dreamt up by the Chinese billionaire Ren Zhengfei. Ren, 74, a former Red Army engineer who founded the telecommunications company Huawei in 1987 and still owns a 1.14% stake, asked the Japanese architect Kengo Kuma to recreate some of Europe's most historic cities. He hoped to inspire an army of 25,000 research and development staff to challenge Apple, Google and Samsung. While its US competitors keep their research facilities on lockdown to prevent corporate espionage (oft allegedly by the Chinese), Huawei is inviting the world's media into its labs and factories in an attempt to dispel the US government's claims that the privately held company is an arm of the Chinese state and that its technology could be used to hack into western governments. US politicians allege that Huawei's forthcoming 5G mobile phone networks could be hacked by Chinese spies to eavesdrop on sensitive phone calls, gain access to counter-terrorist operations – and potentially even kill targets by crashing driverless cars.


AI as a job saver? Why Japan's auto industry is embracing Industry 4.0

ZDNet

The International Auto Show is underway in New York City today, and technology is in the spotlight. Much as the auto industry paved the way for industrial automation, carmakers have started to adopt artificial intelligence to speed up manufacturing and increase precision. That's brought increased focus on human workers. Just as the auto industry is a bellwether for manufacturing tech, it's also a real world laboratory for the effects of new technologies on the labor force. Artificial intelligence in the real world: What can it actually do?


Coming soon to China: the car of the future -- hyper-connected, autonomous and shared

The Japan Times

SHANGHAI - Global automakers are positioning themselves for a brave new world of on-demand transport that will require a car of the future -- hyper-connected, autonomous and shared -- and China may become the concept's laboratory. With ride-hailing services booming and car-sharing not far behind, the need for vehicles tailored to these and other evolving mobility solutions is one of the hottest topics among global automakers gathered for this week's Shanghai Auto Show. Nearly all agree that there is no better proving ground than China: Its gigantic cities are desperate for answers to gridlock and its population is noted for its ready embrace of new high-tech services. To take advantage of this, manufacturers are competing not only to sell conventional and electric vehicles in the world's biggest auto market, but also to develop new technologies and even specific interiors designed for the on-demand world. "We cannot just develop electric cars. They will have to be smart, interconnected and of course shared," Zhao Guoqing, vice president of Chinese auto giant Great Wall Motors, said on the auto show's sidelines.