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Citizens are turning face recognition on unidentified police

MIT Technology Review

Moves have been made to restrict the use of facial recognition across the globe. In part one of this series on Face ID, Jennifer Strong and the team at MIT Technology Review explore the unexpected ways the technology is being used, including how technology is being turned on police. This episode was reported and produced by Jennifer Strong, Tate Ryan-Mosley and Emma Cillekens, and Karen Hao. Strong: A few things have happened since we last spoke about facial recognition. We've seen more places move to restrict its use while at the same time, schools and other public buildings have started using face I-D as part of their covid-prevention plans. We're even using it on animals and not just on faces with similarities to our own, like chimps and gorillas, Chinese tech firms use it on pigs, and Canadian scientists are working to identify whales, even grizzly bears.


Podcast: How Russia's everything company works with the Kremlin

MIT Technology Review

Russia's biggest technology company enjoys a level of dominance that is unparalleled by any one of its Western counterparts. Think Google mixed with equal parts Amazon, Spotify and Uber and you're getting close to the sprawling empire that is Yandex--a single, mega-corporation with its hands in everything from search to ecommerce to driverless cars. But being the crown jewel of Russia's silicon valley has its drawbacks. The country's government sees the internet as contested territory amid ever-present tensions with US and other Western interests. As such, it wants influence over how Yandex uses its massive trove of data on Russian citizens. Foreign investors, meanwhile, are more interested in how that data can be turned into growth and profit. For the September/October issue of MIT Technology Review, Moscow-based journalist Evan Gershkovich explains how Yandex's ability to walk a highwire between the Kremlin and Wall Street could potentially serve as a kind of template for Big Tech.


AI: Artificial intelligence danger of aiding totalitarians – 'Unprecedented power' – IAM Network

#artificialintelligence

Artificial intelligence today (properly known as'narrow' or'weak' AI) is progressing at an ever-accelerating pace. AI can encompass anything from Google's search algorithms to IBM's Watson. However, AI is also being exploited by governments eager to enhance their power over an ever-more digitally-dependent world. Simon McCarthy-Jones, Associate Professor in Clinical Psychology and Neuropsychology at Trinity College Dublin, reveals why the'technological elite' require'checks and balances' in the use and development of artificial intelligence. AI is the ultimate source of knowledge, making it the ultimate source of powerProfessor Simon McCarthy-JonesHe told Express.co.uk: "AI is the ultimate source of knowledge, making it the ultimate source of power."The Russian President, Vladimir Putin, says that whoever leads the world in AI will rule it.


Developing Artificial Intelligence in Russia: Objectives and Reality

#artificialintelligence

Russia's leaders have been paying close attention to artificial intelligence (AI) technologies for several years now. President Vladimir Putin has said on numerous occasions that the leader in the field of AI would become "the master of the world." Until recently, however, Russia remained virtually the only large country without its own AI development strategy. That changed in October 2019, when the country adopted a long-discussed National Strategy for the Development of Artificial Intelligence Through 2030. One of the driving forces behind the strategy was Sberbank president German Gref. The state-owned bank has also developed a road map for developing AI in Russia and coordinated the creation of Russia's AI development strategy, which is largely corporate, involving the internet giants Yandex and Mail.ru


Software System for Road Condition Forecast Correction

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Some of them depend on human behavior; others depend on infrastructure conditions. For example, in many regions of the Russian Federation, spring and autumn temperatures can fluctuate near 0 C, which in combination with rains and high humidity could lead to ice formation on the roads. Detection of these conditions is essential for road safety. Online monitoring allows preventing road accidents by early maintenance; for example, we can use video monitoring of roads' conditions. Machine learning techniques enable detecting ice formation automatically.


Dagen McDowell blasts 'talking heads' as 'tools for Putin' over disputed Russian election interference reports

FOX News

"The Five" discussed the media reaction to reports on Russia's involvement or prospective involvement in the 2020 presidential election Monday, with particular focus on cable news channels CNN and MSNBC. "In terms of these talking heads on TV, the makeup-wearing misery mongers, you're never, ever, ever going to hear them apologize for getting it wrong literally for the last four years," Fox Business Network's Dagen McDowell said. "Because in their in their arrogance and insecurity, they'll never be able to admit that they are tools for Putin and also fools." A U.S. intelligence official told Fox News Sunday that contrary to numerous recent media reports, there is no evidence to suggest that Russia is making a specific "play" to boost President Trump's reelection bid. The official added that top election security official Shelby Pierson, who briefed Congress on Russian election interference efforts earlier this month, may have overstated intelligence regarding the issue.


Whoever leads in artificial intelligence in 2030 will rule the world until 2100

#artificialintelligence

To kick off the Future Development blog in 2020, we present the fourth in a four-part series on the future of development. A couple of years ago, Vladimir Putin warned Russians that the country that led in technologies using artificial intelligence will dominate the globe. He was right to be worried. Russia is now a minor player, and the race seems now to be mainly between the United States and China. But don't count out the European Union just yet; the EU is still a fifth of the world economy, and it has underappreciated strengths.


Whoever leads in artificial intelligence in 2030 will rule the world until 2100

#artificialintelligence

A couple of years ago, Vladimir Putin warned Russians that the country that led in technologies using artificial intelligence will dominate the globe. He was right to be worried. Russia is now a minor player, and the race seems now to be mainly between the United States and China. But don't count out the European Union just yet; the EU is still a fifth of the world economy, and it has underappreciated strengths. Technological leadership will require big digital investments, rapid business process innovation, and efficient tax and transfer systems.


A Stable Nuclear Future? The Impact of Autonomous Systems and Artificial Intelligence

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

The potential for advances in information-age technologies to undermine nuclear deterrence and influence the potential for nuclear escalation represents a critical question for international politics. One challenge is that uncertainty about the trajectory of technologies such as autonomous systems and artificial intelligence (AI) makes assessments difficult. This paper evaluates the relative impact of autonomous systems and artificial intelligence in three areas: nuclear command and control, nuclear delivery platforms and vehicles, and conventional applications of autonomous systems with consequences for nuclear stability. We argue that countries may be more likely to use risky forms of autonomy when they fear that their second-strike capabilities will be undermined. Additionally, the potential deployment of uninhabited, autonomous nuclear delivery platforms and vehicles could raise the prospect for accidents and miscalculation. Conventional military applications of autonomous systems could simultaneously influence nuclear force postures and first-strike stability in previously unanticipated ways. In particular, the need to fight at machine speed and the cognitive risk introduced by automation bias could increase the risk of unintended escalation. Finally, used properly, there should be many applications of more autonomous systems in nuclear operations that can increase reliability, reduce the risk of accidents, and buy more time for decision-makers in a crisis.


Scientists pledge not to build AIs which kill without oversight

#artificialintelligence

Thousands of scientists have signed a pledge not to have any role in building AIs which have the ability to kill without human oversight. When many think of AI, they at least give some passing thought of rogue AIs seen in sci-fi movies such as the infamous Skynet in Terminator. In an ideal world, AI would never be used in any military capacity. However, it was almost certainly be developed one way or another because of the advantage it would provide to an adversary without similar capabilities. Russian President Vladimir Putin, when asked his thoughts on AI, recently said: "Whoever becomes the leader in this sphere will become the ruler of the world."