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Dyslexia link to eye spots confusing brain, say scientists

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French scientists say they may have found a potential cause of dyslexia which could be treatable, hidden in tiny cells in the human eye. In a small study they found that most dyslexics had dominant round spots in both eyes - rather than in just one - leading to blurring and confusion. UK experts said the research was "very exciting" and highlighted the link between vision and dyslexia. But they said not all dyslexics were likely to have the same problem. People with dyslexia have difficulties learning to read, spell or write despite normal intelligence.


Fukushima disaster: The robots going where no human can

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Robots have become central to the cleaning-up operation at Japan's Fukushima nuclear power plant, six years after the tsunami that triggered the nuclear meltdown.


Can we teach robots ethics?

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We are not used to the idea of machines making ethical decisions, but the day when they will routinely do this - by themselves - is fast approaching. Amy, a 29-year-old with a Cambridge University PhD, is the lead engineer on the Jaguar Land Rover autonomous car. Like autonomous weapons and driverless cars, carebots will have choices to make. The autonomous weapon won't make bad choices because it is angry.


Jeremy Corbyn: Let workers control robots

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The Labour leader, who has previously warned of the risk to jobs of automation, will say new technology has led to "a more rapacious and exploitative form of capitalism". Drivers would collectively agree their own pay and conditions, he will say. Speaking to the Co-operative Party Conference in London on Saturday, Mr Corbyn will return to his warning made in Labour's conference about the possible impact on workers. Mr Corbyn will say: "Imagine an Uber run co-operatively by their drivers, collectively controlling their futures, agreeing their own pay and conditions, with profits shared or re-invested.


Where are all the women in economics?

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We hear a lot about the under-representation of women in so-called STEM fields - science, technology, engineering and maths. But the proportion of women in economics is by some measures smaller. In the US, only about 13% of women hold permanent academic positions in economics; and in the UK the proportion is only slightly better at 15.5%. Only one woman has ever won the Nobel Prize in economics - American Elinor Ostrom in 2009. And there wasn't even a single woman on some of the lists floating about guessing who this year's prize winner would be - it went to the behavioural economist Richard Thaler.


Can we tell if Donald Trump has a high IQ?

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They are: public communication, organisational capacity, political skill, vision, cognitive style, and emotional intelligence. "Trump scores low on emotional intelligence, cognitive style, vision, and organisational capacity," says Dr Perry. But - whether Mr Trump's IQ is high or low - Dr Lawlis from Mensa says it doesn't tell you everything. Either way, the time for talking may soon be over - Mensa has offered to test both Mr Trump and Mr Tillerson's IQ.


Can 'sex robots' help disabled people?

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Also on this BBC Ouch show, the disabled teen punk who left home to find an independent life for herself in the less-accessible 80s. And the action movie where sign language is a super-power.


100 Women: Who's going to lose out from automation?

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While there is debate about the benefits of automation in the world of work, there is no escaping the fact that more robots and artificial intelligence means more jobs in science, technology, engineering and maths, known as the Stem group. If current gender ratios remain the same until 2020, according to the World Economic Forum's study of more than a dozen advanced economies, for every twenty jobs lost to automation, men working in STEM will see five new jobs and women just one. The World Economic Forum's 2016 Future of Jobs report indicated men and women would share the burden of jobs losses fairly equally. "If we don't do something, bias will propagate and get worse," says Ms Van Wynsberghe, the robotics expert.


Could a hacker hijack your connected car?

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As more carmakers adopt "over the air (OTA)" software updates for their increasingly connected and autonomous cars, is the risk of hacker hijack also increasing? And earlier this year, Tesla boss Elon Musk warned about the dangers of hackers potentially taking control of thousands of driverless cars. Meanwhile, Bosch is planning to start offering OTA updates through control units and in-car communication infrastructure developed in-house, distributing the updates via its "internet of things" (IoT) cloud. Tesla unlocked the extra power by sending an OTA update to the cars via wi-fi or 4G.


100 Women: Can we wire our brains for confidence?

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This ultimately has an enormous impact, as study after study shows that having women at work in positions of power correlates with profitability, more collaborative environments, and improved problem solving. We hear damaging terms like "women's intuition" suggesting that we aren't making strategic analyses, but basing our decisions on some ethereal gut feeling when study after study shows that women and men are equally data-driven. To start, it's important to remove ourselves from situations and people that make us feel bad because confidence largely comes from being in a supportive environment. Dr Stacie Grossman Bloom is Assistant Vice-President for Policy & Administration, and Associate Professor at the Department of Neuroscience & Physiology, NYU Langone Health.