AI-Alerts


Kroger ends its unmanned-vehicle grocery delivery pilot program in Arizona

USATODAY

Nuro has partnered with Fry's Food Stores to utilize its autonomous vehicles to deliver groceries in Scottsdale. Supermarket giant Kroger said it soon will end a pilot program in which more than 2,000 grocery deliveries were made in self-driving vehicles from a store in Scottsdale, Arizona. The program, launched last August, featured deliveries in autonomous vehicles from robotics company Nuro from the Kroger-owned Fry's store at 7770 E. McDowell Road for customers in ZIP code 85257. The companies described it as the nation's first program featuring deliveries to the general public from fully unmanned vehicles. Wednesday will mark the final day of deliveries.


Trained neural nets perform much like humans on classic psychological tests

#artificialintelligence

In the early part of the 20th century, a group of German experimental psychologists began to question how the brain acquires meaningful perceptions of a world that is otherwise chaotic and unpredictable. To answer this question, they developed the notion of the "gestalt effect"--the idea that when it comes to perception, the whole is something other than the parts. Sine then, psychologists have discovered that the human brain is remarkably good at perceiving complete pictures on the basis of fragmentary information. A good example is the figure shown here. The brain perceives two-dimensional shapes such as a triangle and a square, and even a three-dimensional sphere.


Facial Recognition's 'Dirty Little Secret': Millions of Online Photos Scraped Without Consent

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Legal experts warn people's online photos are being used without permission to power facial-recognition technology that could eventually be used for surveillance. Legal experts warn people's online photos are being used without permission to power facial-recognition technology that could eventually be used for surveillance. Said New York University School of Law's Jason Schultz, "This is the dirty little secret of [artificial intelligence] training sets. Researchers often just grab whatever images are available in the wild." IBM recently issued a set of nearly 1 million photos culled from the image-hosting site Flickr, and programmed to describe subjects' appearance, allegedly to help reduce bias in facial recognition; although IBM said Flickr users can opt out of the database, deleting photos is almost impossible.


Robotic Surgery Now Common at West Virginia Hospital

U.S. News

During surgery, the da Vinci robot is docked over the patient and the instruments still typically enter through the abdomen, through much smaller incisions than a traditional laparotomy, which opens up the belly. The surgeon sits at a nearby control panel in the operating room where they can maneuver cameras and instruments with a range exceeding the human hand.


Quantum computing should supercharge this machine-learning technique

#artificialintelligence

Quantum computing and artificial intelligence are both hyped ridiculously. But it seems a combination of the two may indeed combine to open up new possibilities. In a research paper published today in the journal Nature, researchers from IBM and MIT show how an IBM quantum computer can accelerate a specific type of machine-learning task called feature matching. The team says that future quantum computers should allow machine learning to hit new levels of complexity. As first imagined decades ago, quantum computers were seen as a different way to compute information.


Latest Generation of Lionfish-Hunting Robot Can Find and Zap More Fish Than Ever

IEEE Spectrum Robotics Channel

It's always cool to see lionfish while snorkeling or scuba diving. They're spectacular-looking, and because they're covered in flamboyant spines, they're usually secure enough in their invincibility that they'll mostly just sit there and let you get close to them. Lionfish don't make for very good oceanic neighbors, though, and in places where they're an invasive species and have few native predators (like most of the Atlantic coast of the United States), they do their best to eat anything that moves while breeding almost continuously. A single lionfish per reef reduced young juvenile fish populations by 79 percent in only a five-week period. Many species were affected, including cardinalfish, parrotfish, damselfish, and others.


Machine learning in quantum spaces

#artificialintelligence

Machine learning and quantum computing have their staggering levels of technology hype in common. But certain aspects of their mathematical foundations are also strikingly similar. In a paper in Nature, Havlíček et al.1 exploit this link to show how today's quantum computers can, in principle, be used to learn from data -- by mapping data into the space in which only quantum states exist. One of the first things one learns about quantum computers is that these machines are extremely difficult to simulate on a classical computer such as a desktop PC. In other words, classical computers cannot be used to obtain the results of a quantum computation.


Six positive ways drones can be used

BBC News

An extended 5km (3.1 miles) no-fly zone for drones has come into force around airports in the UK after reported sightings at Gatwick, Heathrow and Dublin airports in recent months grounded hundreds of flights and left thousands stranded. Previously, only a 1km (0.6 mile) exclusion zone was in place. But despite the negative reputation they have received, the use of drones isn't all bad. From finding missing people to delivering takeaways, here are some of the ways the unmanned aircraft can be beneficial. A Norfolk man who went missing in June last year was only found when a police drone spotted him stuck on a marsh.


How the brain distinguishes between objects

MIT News

As visual information flows into the brain through the retina, the visual cortex transforms the sensory input into coherent perceptions. Neuroscientists have long hypothesized that a part of the visual cortex called the inferotemporal (IT) cortex is necessary for the key task of recognizing individual objects, but the evidence has been inconclusive. In a new study, MIT neuroscientists have found clear evidence that the IT cortex is indeed required for object recognition; they also found that subsets of this region are responsible for distinguishing different objects. In addition, the researchers have developed computational models that describe how these neurons transform visual input into a mental representation of an object. They hope such models will eventually help guide the development of brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) that could be used for applications such as generating images in the mind of a blind person.