Oceania


Senate committee considers EV boost to Australian health and mining

ZDNet

The public inquiry into the uptake of electric vehicles (EVs) in Australia has heard that the mining sector and the health of Australians would benefit if there were more of them in the market. During the inquiry's second hearing on Friday in Canberra, Doctors for the Environment Australia, the Pilbara Metals Group, and the Association of Mining and Exploration Companies (AMEC) gave evidence to the committee. In a report produced by the AMEC, it was estimated that the lithium value chain -- which includes raw materials through to cells and battery packs -- could increase from $165 billion to $2 trillion by 2025 if more EVs were to be introduced down under. The chief executive of AMEC Warren Pearce said that rather than just exporting lithium, Australia should also focus on processing the minerals and manufacturing electric vehicle batteries, according to the ABC. AMEC says that Western Australia alone mines 60 percent of the world's supply of lithium used for the production of EV batteries.


Is New Zealand prepared for artificial intelligence on its roads and infrastructure?

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The Herald spoke to industry leaders Mahmood Hikmet, R&D Coordinator, Ohmio; Matthew Ensor, Business Director - Advisory, Beca Diane Edwards, General Manager People, Systems and Technology, Ports of Auckland; Ben Reid, Executive Director, AI Forum NZ and Coby Duggan, General Manager, Volvo New Zealand to understand the AI opportunities for New Zealand, and what it could mean for the future of our roads and infrastructure. It's already out there and has been for decades! There is so much artificial intelligence already around you and not just on the roads. Ensor: It is hard to prepare when there is so much uncertainty around what changes artificial intelligence will create. We need to wait before making bets on which emerging technologies will dominate.


Humanity confronts a defining question: How will AI change us?

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What will happen when we've built machines as intelligent as us? According to the experts this incredible feat will be achieved in the year 2062 – a mere 44 years away – which certainly begs the question: what will the world, our jobs, the economy, politics, war, and everyday life and death, look like then? Fortunately, Toby Walsh, Scientia Professor of Artificial Intelligence (AI) at UNSW has done the research for us. An avid sci-fi fan from childhood, Walsh, who also leads the Algorithmic Decision Theory group at Data61 – Australia's Centre of Excellence for ICT Research, has long been fascinated by robots, machines and the future. In 2017, he published his first book, It's Alive!, in which he tells the story of AI and how it is already affecting our societies, economies and interactions.


Artificial intelligence can assess personality

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Putting aside the concept of'personality' and its disputed nature within psychology, the new platform attempts to group subjects into different personality types on the basis of eye-motion. The research comes from the University of South Australia. Visual exploration is driven by two main factors. First there is the stimuli in our environment; and second, in response to our own individual interests and intentions. It is through the latter that some researchers think that personality traits can be discerned.


Why Machine Learning And Big Data Will Produce The Earliest Wins

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Machine learning and Big Data will produce the earliest wins for organizations utilizing emerging digital technology, according to Sehida Frawley, SAP Australia and New Zealand head of digital business services. However, she cautions, generating value and confidence in the technology will depend on an organization's resources, technology ecosystems, and trust. For example, in order for organizations to trust the outcome of machine learning, they must also be able to trust the underlying data, Frawley said. The trust requirement extends to other technology, like blockchain, where there must be "trust in the relationship of that chain." Ultimately, generating value from emerging technology like machine learning, blockchain, and IoT will also depend on resources – how much effort is required to have success – and the technology ecosystems to support new applications, Frawley said.


WA Police to get body-worn camera tech

ZDNet

The Western Australia Police Force has said it will roll out body-worn cameras across the state from early 2019 as a way to improve evidence capture and offer greater safety for officers. Western Australia Police Commissioner Chris Dawson told The West Australian on Thursday that while members of the public are increasingly filming police incidents, equipping front-line officers remains a priority ahead of specific state government funding to help corroborate evidence. "Body-worn cameras are now commonly used in other policing jurisdictions, with potential benefits including improved evidence gathering and a greater opportunity to capture the whole of an incident rather than rely on piecemeal recordings," Dawson told the paper on Thursday. A WA Police spokesperson also said that they will be seeking technology that would automatically activate the cameras when officers would be about to use a weapon and back-capture at least 30 seconds of footage, according to the paper. The cameras will not record constantly during an officer's shift, it added, but will be required to when attending incidents such as family violence complaints.


Humanity confronts a defining question: How will AI change us?

#artificialintelligence

What will happen when we've built machines as intelligent as us? According to the experts this incredible feat will be achieved in the year 2062 – a mere 44 years away – which certainly begs the question: what will the world, our jobs, the economy, politics, war, and everyday life and death, look like then? Fortunately, Toby Walsh, Scientia Professor of Artificial Intelligence (AI) at UNSW has done the research for us. An avid sci-fi fan from childhood, Walsh, who also leads the Algorithmic Decision Theory group at Data61 – Australia's Centre of Excellence for ICT Research, has long been fascinated by robots, machines and the future. In 2017, he published his first book, It's Alive!, in which he tells the story of AI and how it is already affecting our societies, economies and interactions.


Human Services eyes a future of citizen service delivery via virtual assistants

ZDNet

Australia's Department of Human Services (DHS) CIO Charles McHardie believes the future of routine citizen service delivery is interaction via virtual assistants, mostly on smartphones. McHardie told the Technology in Government conference in Canberra on Wednesday that he sees DHS becoming a "very virtual assistant-heavy department", with the "app" disappearing, and instead sees the citizen interacting directly with the artificial intelligence bot. "We think you will talk to our virtual assistant to be able to give us a change in circumstance, to be able to lodge a claim, to find out information about DHS, and you'll be able to do it in your own native tongue," he explained. "From a citizen perspective, we think AI and virtual assistants will allow us to, moving forward, provide a dynamic and very tailored experience for the citizen." After implementing its first virtual assistant in 2016, the department now has "many", according to McHardie.


Ready for Takeoff

Slate

In 2017, the Australian military drone-racing team made its competitive debut during the Australian Drone Nationals. Given the technology's long history within the military, you might think they would have an edge. But that's not what happened. Drone racing is a fairly new sport that merges video game racing with real-life drone flying. Racers put on a pair of first-person view (or FPV) goggles, which allow them to see exactly what they would if they were sitting in the teeny-tiny cockpit.


Artificial Intelligence Can Track Eye Movements to Predict Your Personality

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By now we should have an understanding of what artificial intelligence (AI) is capable of today, and what it could accomplish in the future. Now, the latest possible thing AI could do in the future, according to one study, is to predict human personality traits. A recent study done by the University of South Australia has shown that artificial intelligence is capable of telling the type of personality traits that live inside any human being. To accomplish this, the university tracked the eye movements of 42 participants while they go about their daily lives. Now, before the subjects were made to live with an AI watching their every move, they were required to take part in a personality questionnaire.