drone


Meet drone dueling, the sport California is about to inadvertently kill

Popular Science

In its current form, California Senate Bill 347 says "A person shall not weaponize a remote piloted aircraft or operate a weaponized remote piloted aircraft." Without exceptions for sporting use or clarifying what, exactly, a weaponized drone is, California's "State Remote Piloted Aircraft Act" could end drone duels, and limit what exactly a future sport could be. The Aerial Sports League runs drone events, including racing and drone combat, in the Bay Area, and has since its founding in 2011. Before each event, the Aerial Sports League sets guidelines, and then there's a check-in at the event to make sure the weapon is calibrated so that it won't cause harm.


Drone impedes Arizona firefighters' efforts to battle wildfire

FOX News

Arizona officials are concerned drones are getting in the way of their ability to fight wildfire. The National Interagency Fire Center reports that there were 41 drone incursions in the U.S. last year while aerial firefighting was underway. In a Fact Sheet compiled by the U.S. Forest Service, officials outlined the scope of the FAA regulations surrounding Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS). A spokesperson from the National Interagency Fire Center (NIFC) tells Fox News that it is against federal regulations per the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, 43 CFR 9212.1(f), it is illegal to resist or interfere with the efforts of firefighter(s) to extinguish a fire.


AI to Ensure Fewer UFOs

IEEE Spectrum Robotics Channel

They initially collaborated on a project that trained machine-learning algorithms to automatically detect deer on highways based on radar and infrared camera data. When a Dedrone system is being installed at a new site, humans label unfamiliar objects as part of the training process, which also updates the company's proprietary DroneDNA library. "Each time we update DroneDNA, we process over 250 million different images of drones, aircraft, birds, and other objects," says Michael Dyballa, Dedrone's director of engineering. Though Black Sage's and Dedrone's automated detection systems are said to be capable of running without human assistance after their respective training phases, the companies' clients may choose to put humans in the loop for engaging active defenses, such as jammers or lasers, to take down flying intruders.


Drone drops HOT DOGS!

FOX News

Recent events clearly suggest fast food fans will be very well catered for once full-fledged drone delivery services get off the ground. Oscar Mayer is the latest to join the party, this week unveiling the WienerDrone as part of its WienerFleet, which of course includes its famous WienerMobile. Domino's Pizza in New Zealand is already offering a limited drone delivery service for fans of the cheesy delight, flying orders from one of its outlets to customers in under 10 minutes. Domino's flying machine, built by Nevada-based drone specialist Flirtey, lowers the boxed pizza using a tether.


These drone racing goggles could spark the sport's digital era

Engadget

Fat Shark has been the go-to maker of racing drone goggles for several years, and it's about to double down on digital, which in turn could be the nudge toward dropping analog feeds that the sport needs. It's still not uncommon to see a racing drone held together by tape or cable ties sporting a shoddily 3D-printed GoPro mount, and for the most part, that's fine. We've seen drones like UVify's Draco and Amimon's Falcore try and sex-up racing drones, and introduce digital video features -- but most of the sport hasn't committed to going digital just yet. Seemingly something the company was aware of, so it's dropped the shark logo (kinda), and given itself a visual makeover.


MIT's new drones that both fly and drive could be huge for creating flying cars

Mashable

Thanks to a team of researchers at MIT, we're one step closer to finally having the flying car technology that science fiction of the 1950s promised us. A team at MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) is working to help achieve all our flying car dreams by developing drones that can both drive and fly. It includes eight quadcopter drones with the ability to fly or drive through a course that includes parking lots, landing pads, and no-fly zones. And while the project is currently working with drones, it could be a huge development for flying cars in the future.


Scientists have created drones that can fly and drive

Daily Mail

Adding the driving component to the drone slightly reduced its battery life, meaning that the maximum distance it could fly decreased 14 per cent to about 91 metres. Airborne drones are fast and agile, but generally have too limited a battery life to travel for long distances. Airborne drones are fast and agile, but generally have too limited of a battery life to travel for long distances. Adding the driving component to the drone slightly reduced its battery life, meaning that the maximum distance it could fly decreased by 14 per cent to about 91 metres (300ft).


Autonomous Drone-Flying Car Hybrid Being Developed At MIT

International Business Times

The hybrid model could solve the ultimate quagmire for drones -- they cannot travel large distances at a go, since flying, even though it is fast and very mobile, is generally limited by battery life. The project is based on "path planning" algorithms, which will ensure that the drones do not collide. "As we begin to develop planning and control algorithms for flying cars, we are encouraged by the possibility of creating robots with these capabilities at small scale. While there are obviously still big challenges to scaling up to vehicles that could actually transport humans, we are inspired by the potential of a future in which flying cars could offer us fast, traffic-free transportation," CSAIL Director Daniela Rus said in the press release.


MIT already has your flying car in miniature form

Engadget

Some drones fly, others drive. That's why a team from MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) have developed a fleet of autonomous drones that have rotors and wheels, giving them the capability avoid obstacles on the ground and to go underneath overhead obstructions. The team's drones work so well, in fact, that the researchers believe they present another approach to designing flying cars. "As we begin to develop planning and control algorithms for flying cars, we are encouraged by the possibility of creating robots with these capabilities at small scale.


System of quadcopters that fly and drive suggest another approach to developing flying cars

#artificialintelligence

The ability to both fly and drive is useful in environments with a lot of barriers, since you can fly over ground obstacles and drive under overhead obstacles, says PhD student Brandon Araki, lead author on the paper. The project builds on Araki's previous work developing a flying monkey robot that crawls, grasps, and flies. Rus says that systems like theirs suggest that another approach to creating safe and effective flying cars is not to simply put wings on cars, but to build on years of research in adding driving capabilities to drones. As we begin to develop planning and control algorithms for flying cars, we are encouraged by the possibility of creating robots with these capabilities at small scale, Rus says.