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Tilia Labs Launches AI-Driven Imposition Solutions for HP Indigo Presses

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Central to the collaboration with HP Indigo is Tilia Labs' flagship software tilia Phoenix. This is planning and imposition software that uses AI technology to reduce cost and optimize production in all print segments including packaging, labels, commercial, and wide format printing. Its AI-generated layouts eliminate the need for template-based imposition, instead dynamically adapting to manufacturing requirements and constraints – an innovation that earned tilia Phoenix a 2019 InterTech Award. HP Indigo customers benefit from AI technology Designed by Tilia Labs to be powerful and dynamic, tilia Phoenix's Imposition AI works quickly enough to keep up with the fastest presses on the market. For albelli of The Hague in the Netherlands, this means delivering automated, multi-lane impositions on-the-fly to their HP 50000 Digital Press - printing up to 770 duplex color/ 2300 mono pages per minute.


The surprising future of fintech

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Thanks to open banking, fintech early adopters likely already have accounts that round up transactions to boost savings or connect to third-party tools for loan applications, budget management and more. But the new wave of fintech startups are proving there's much more that can be done using open banking, the two-year-old mandate from UK regulators that required banks to easily allow their customers to share their data with third parties such as apps. "Open banking offers people the chance to get personalised, tailored support to help them manage their money by allowing regulated companies to securely analyse their bank data," says Lubaina Manji, senior programme manager at Nesta Challenges, one of the organisations behind the Open Up 2020 Challenge, alongside the Open Banking Implementation Entity (OBIE). "It's enabled the creation of new services and tools to help people with every aspect of money management – from budgeting to investing, and much, much more, all in a safe and secure way." And some of the innovations from finalists in the Open Up 2020 Challenge have surprised with their ingenuity and customer focus, she says, citing Sustainably's round-up tool for automated charity donations, and Kalgera's neuroscience-informed AI to help spot fraud targeting people with dementia – two projects that highlight the purpose-driven idea behind open banking and the aim to get financial support to show who need it the most.


IBM Research releases differential privacy library that works with machine learning

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Differential privacy has become an integral way for data scientists to learn from the majority of their data while simultaneously ensuring that those results do not allow any individual's data to be distinguished or re-identified. To help more researchers with their work, IBM released the open-source Differential Privacy Library. The library "boasts a suite of tools for machine learning and data analytics tasks, all with built-in privacy guarantees," according to Naoise Holohan, a research staff member on IBM Research Europe's privacy and security team. "Our library is unique to others in giving scientists and developers access to lightweight, user-friendly tools for data analytics and machine learning in a familiar environment–in fact, most tasks can be run with only a single line of code," Holohan wrote in a blog post on Friday. "What also sets our library apart is our machine learning functionality enables organizations to publish and share their data with rigorous guarantees on user privacy like never before."


DeepDream: How Alexander Mordvintsev Excavated the Computer's Hidden Layers

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Early in the morning on May 18, 2015, Alexander Mordvintsev made an amazing discovery. He had been having trouble sleeping. Just after midnight, he awoke with a start. He was sure he'd heard a noise in the Zurich apartment where he lived with his wife and child. Afraid that he hadn't locked the door to the terrace, he ran out of the bedroom to check if there was an intruder. All was fine; the terrace door was locked, and there was no intruder.


IBM uses AI to enhance old Wimbledon tennis footage for the digital era

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Along with just about every other major sporting event, the Wimbledon grand slam tennis tournament was canceled this year due to the COVID-19 crisis. However, organizers at the All England Lawn Tennis & Croquet Club (AELTC) have tapped long-time partner IBM to create a virtual two-week event consisting of classic matches dating back more than 40 years. To go beyond just bringing old matches to modern digital platforms, IBM and AELTC have leveraged AI techniques to revitalize old footage and appeal to modern viewers. With matches stretching as far back as 1977, a wide range of video quality is to be expected, and older recordings tend to have an issue with visual "noise." "To the naked eye, this noise is like static in the image, with color pixels dancing," IBM executive Sam Seddon told VentureBeat.


AI Startup Pilots Digital Masks That Counter Facial Recognition

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Alethea AI, a synthetic media company, is piloting “privacy-preserving face skins,” or digital masks that counter facial recognition algorithms and help users preserve privacy on pre-recorded videos.  The move comes as companies such as IBM, Microsoft, and Amazon announced they would suspend the sale of their facial recognition technology to law enforcement agencies.  “This is a new technique we developed inhouse that wraps a face with our AI algorithms,” said Alethea AI CEO Arif Khan. “Avatars are fun to play with and develop, but these ‘masks/skins’ are a different, more potent, animal to preserve privacy.” Related: Why CoinDesk Respects Pseudonymity: A Stand Against Doxxing See also: Human Rights Foundation Funds Bitcoin Privacy Tools Despite ‘Coin Mixing’ Legal Stigma The Los Angeles based startup launched in 2019 with a focus on creating avatars for content creators that the creators could license out for revenue. The idea comes as deepfakes, or manipulated media that can make someone appear as if they are doing or saying anything, becomes more accessible and widespread. According to a 2019 report from Deep Trace, a company which detects and monitors deepfakes, there were over 14,000 deepfakes online in 2019 and over 850 people were targeted by them. Alethea AI wants to let creators use their own synthetic media avatars for marketing purposes, in a sense trying to let people leverage deepfakes of themselves for money.  Khan compares the proliferation of facial recognition data now to the Napster-style explosion in music piracy in the early 2000s. Companies, like Clearview AI, have already harvested large amounts of data from people for facial recognition algorithms, then resold this data to security services without consent, and with all the bias inherent in facial recognition algorithms, which are generally less accurate on women and people of color.  Related: The Zcash Privacy Tech Underlying Ethereum’s Transition to Eth 2.0 Clearview AI, has marketed itself to law enforcement and scraped billions of images from websites like Facebook, Youtube, and Venmo. The company is currently being sued for doing so.   “We will get to a point where there needs to be an iTunes sort of layer, where your face and voice data somehow gets protected,” said Khan.  One part of that is creators licensing out their likeness for a fee. Crypto entrepreneur Alex Masmej was the first such avatar, and for $99 you can hire the avatar to say 200 words of whatever you want, provided the real Masmej approves the text.  We will get to a point where… where your face and voice data somehow gets protected Alethea AI has also partnered with software firm Oasis Labs, so that all content generated for Alethea AI’s synthetic media marketplace will be verified using Oasis Lab’s secure blockchain, akin to Twitter’s “verified” blue check mark.  “There are a lot of Black Mirror scenarios when we think of deepfakes but if my personal approval is needed for my deepfakes and it’s then time-stamped on a public blockchain for anyone to verify the videos that I actually want to release, that provides a protection that deepfakes are currently lacking,” said Masmej.  The privacy pilot takes this idea one step further, not only creating a deep fake license out, but preventing companies or anyone from grabbing your facial data from a recording.  There are two parts to the privacy component. The first, currently being piloted, involves pre-recorded videos. Users upload a video, identify where and what face skin they would like superimposed on their own, and then Alethea AI’s algorithms map the key points on your own face, and wrap the mask around this key point map that is created. The video is then sent back to a client.  See also: Fake News on Steroids: Deepfakes Are Coming – Are World Leaders Prepared? Alethea AI also wants to enable face masking during real time communications, such as over a Zoom call. But Khan says computing power doesn’t quite allow that yet, though it should be possible in a year, he hopes.  Alethea AI piloted one example of the tech with Crypto AI Profit, a blockchain and AI influencer, who used it during a Youtube video.  Deepfakes, voice spoofing, and other tech enabled mimicry seem here to stay, but Khan is still optimistic that we’re not yet at the point of no return when it comes to protecting ourselves.  “I’m hopeful that the individual is accorded some sort of framework in this entire emerging landscape,” said Khan. “It’s going to be a very interesting ride. I don’t think the battle is fully decided, although existing systems are oriented towards preserving larger, more corporate input.” Related Stories JD.com Subsidiary Rolling Out Privacy Tech From Blockchain Firm ARPA From Australia to Norway, Contact Tracing Is Struggling to Meet Expectations


AI Powered Cancer Screening Coming to the NHS -- AI Daily - Artificial Intelligence News

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With Ibex's Galen Prostate solution, prostate biopsies will be reviewed using a highly accurate AI algorithm that checks for inconsistencies between the pathologist's findings and what it detects. In the case of a significant discrepancy, the pathologists will be notified, creating a valuable layer of protection against mistakes, potentially saving many patients from false negatives. In an ongoing audit at the request of the NHS Trust, their AI algorithm was able to spot otherwise unnoticed prostate cancer, showing just how valuable this tech is. The use of AI shows great promise in healthcare, and it's reassuring to see plans for its implementation in cancer screening. Without doubt, it won't be long before we see artificial intelligence being a crucial tool to all avenues of medicine.


Is The Brain An Effective Artificial Intelligence Model?

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In the summer of 2009, the Israeli neuroscientist Henry Markram endeavored onto the TED stage in Oxford, England, and introduced an immodest proposal: he and his colleagues would develop a full human brain simulation inside a supercomputer within a decade. They had been mapping the cells in the neocortex, the supposed seat of thought and perception, for years already. "It's a bit like going and cataloging one piece of rainforest," explained Markram. "How many trees it has? What features are the trees? "His team would now establish a virtual Silicon rainforest from which they hoped artificial intelligence would evolve organically.


'GTA V' brings transphobia to the next console generation

Engadget

Imagine there's a marquee game coming out next year from one of the coolest AAA video game studios in the world, and its first round of marketing has just gone live. It's nighttime in the game and the streamer, playing as a middle-aged man, approaches a group of people standing outside of a club. They're all broad-shouldered with cut biceps, and they're wearing an assortment of wigs, crop tops, mini skirts, lace stockings and bikini bottoms. Chest hair pokes out from some of their shirts, and under layers of dramatic makeup, a few jawlines are dusted with stubble. The tight clothing highlights obvious crotch-level bulges.


Voicemod raises $8 million for silly or serious voice filters in games

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Voicemod has raised $8 million to expand its business of offering voice filters. People use these filters to change their voices in video games or in virtual worlds, where animated avatars can make your words sound silly. The Valencia, Spain-based company was founded by three brothers who were musicians in 2009, but it really picked up after shifting a couple of years ago to focus on real-time voice modification for gamers and content creators on the PC. Now Voicemod has more than 10 million downloads and 2.5 million monthly active users. Bitkraft Ventures led the funding round.