China


For Chinese kids and young adults, world of computer coding is child's play

The Japan Times

BEIJING – Wearing a pair of black-rimmed glasses and a red T-shirt, an 8-year-old Chinese boy is logged in for an online coding lesson -- as the teacher. Vita has set up a coding tutorial channel on the Chinese video streaming site Bilibili since August and has so far garnered nearly 60,000 followers and over 1 million views. He is among a growing number of children in China who are learning coding even before they enter primary school. The trend has been fueled by parents' belief that coding skills will be essential for Chinese teenagers given the government's technological drive. "Coding's not that easy but also not that difficult -- at least not as difficult as you have imagined," said Vita, who lives in Shanghai.


China's AI Unicorns Can Spot Faces. Now They Need New Tricks

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A warehouse in an industrial park about an hour's drive north of downtown Beijing offers a paradoxical picture of China's much-hyped, and increasingly controversial, artificial intelligence boom. Inside the building, a handful of squat cylindrical robots scuttle about, following an intricate and invisible pattern. Occasionally, one zips beneath a stack of shelves, raises it gently off the ground, then brings it to a station where a human worker can grab items for packing. A handful of engineers stare intently at code running on a bank of computers. The robots and the AI behind them were developed by Megvii, one of China's vaunted AI unicorns.


Chatbots spotlight machine learning's trillion-dollar potential – TechCrunch

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The global industry potential of artificial intelligence is well-documented, yet the vision of this AI future is uncertain. AI and automation trends are generating significant debate among economists and governments, particularly around employment impact and uncertain social outcomes. The mainstream attention is warranted. According to PwC, AI "could contribute up to $15.7 trillion to the global economy in 2030, more than the current output of China and India combined." AI is at a crossroads, and its long-term outlook is still hotly debated.


Chatbots spotlight machine learning's trillion-dollar potential – TechCrunch

#artificialintelligence

The global industry potential of artificial intelligence is well-documented, yet the vision of this AI future is uncertain. AI and automation trends are generating significant debate among economists and governments, particularly around employment impact and uncertain social outcomes. The mainstream attention is warranted. According to PwC, AI "could contribute up to $15.7 trillion to the global economy in 2030, more than the current output of China and India combined." AI is at a crossroads, and its long-term outlook is still hotly debated.


One of Stephen Hawking's Last Talks. Guiding AI to Benefit Humanity and the Environment.

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Sign in to report inappropriate content. He gave dire warnings as well as glimmers of hope about the impacts of Artificial Intelligence on humanity. Created for and initially shown at GMIC Beijing 2017 conference.


This AI can diagnose diseases faster and more accurately than ever before

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Chinese internet-based technology and cultural enterprise Tencent is using AI innovations in medical imaging and data mining to provide better, faster, more comprehensive diagnoses. In this extract from the GLOBAL INNOVATION INDEX 2019, Tencent's Founder and Chief Executive Ma Huateng looks at the revolutionary impact of AI and big data in China's healthcare service.


Altdeep Newsletter

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AltDeep is a newsletter focused on microtrend-spotting in data and decision science, machine learning, and AI. Know an engineer, research scientist, AI product manager, or entrepreneur in the AI space? Buy them a gift subscription. The Economist is the latest top tier publication to hype the GPT-2 transformer network language model created by OpenAI. They did so by "interviewing" the network, meaning that it generated "unedited" answers to the questions.


All it takes to fool facial recognition at airports and banks is a printed mask, researchers found

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Facial recognition is being widely embraced as a security tool -- law enforcement and corporations alike are rolling it out to keep tabs on who's accessing airports, stores, and smartphone lock screens. As it turns out, the technology is fallible. Researchers with the AI firm Kneron were able to fool facial recognition systems at banks, border crossing checkpoints, and airports using a printed mask depicting a different person's face, they announced Thursday. Researchers tested facial recognition across three continents. They successfully fooled payment tablets run by Chinese companies Alipay and WeChat, as well as a border crossing checkpoint in China.


China plans new era of sea power with unmanned AI submarines

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China is planning to upgrade its naval power with unmanned AI submarines that aim to provide an edge over the fleets of their global counterparts. A report by the South China Post on Sunday revealed Beijing's plans to build the automated subs by the early 2020s in response to unmanned weapons being developed in the US. The subs will be able to patrol areas in the South China Sea and Pacific Ocean that are home to disputed military bases. While the expected cost of the submarines has not been disclosed, they're likely to be cheaper than conventional submarines as they do not require life-supporting apparatus for humans. However, without a human crew, they'll also need to be resilient enough to be at sea without onboard repairs possible.


An Ethical Approach to AI is an Absolute Imperative Olbios

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Artificial Intelligence (AI), defined as a system's ability to correctly interpret external data, to learn from such data, and to use what it learns to achieve specific goals and tasks through flexible adaptation, will doubtlessly lead to a multitude of changes in today's world. Given the significant uncertainties around artificial intelligence, it is not astonishing that the opinions on it reach from highly euphoric like the vision of best-selling author Raymond Kurzweil to straight out alarmist as frequently expressed by tech entrepreneur and investor Elon Musk. Theoretical physicist Stephen Hawking called AI "either the best, or the worst thing, ever happen to humanity". For at least three reasons, ethics as well as a human approach to AI and its progress are an absolute imperative. First, an AI system will do whatever assignment it has been asked to do, independent of whether these tasks are illegal, unethical, or simply produce negative outcomes.