Military


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New Scientist

I'm in the cockpit of a Typhoon fighter jet. It's a scene inside an Oculus Rift headset at the new Training and Simulation Integration Facility belonging to defence company BAE Systems. It seems that to make the next great fighter jet, you start by working out what ideas you can pinch from the big consumer tech companies. The burning question on my mind, though, is how the company can even consider replacing cockpit controls with a view of the landscape.


Elon Musk leads 116 experts calling for outright ban of killer robots

#artificialintelligence

In their letter, the founders warn the review conference of the convention on conventional weapons that this arms race threatens to usher in the "third revolution in warfare" after gunpowder and nuclear arms. This is not the first time the IJCAI, one of the world's leading AI conferences, has been used as a platform to discuss lethal autonomous weapons systems. It said that the UK was not developing lethal autonomous weapons and that all weapons employed by UK armed forces would be "under human oversight and control". The unmanned combat aerial vehicle, about the size of a BAE Hawk, the plane used by the Red Arrows, had its first test flight in 2013 and is expected to be operational some time after 2030 as part of the Royal Air Force's Future Offensive Air System, destined to replace the human-piloted Tornado GR4 warplanes.


Tech leaders warn against robotic weapons

Daily Mail

Killer robots should be urgently banned before a wave of weapons of mass destruction gets out of control, industry leaders say. Killer robots should be urgently banned before a wave of weapons of mass destruction gets out of control, industry leaders say. It warns the Fifth Review Conference of the UN Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons that automated warfare represents a'third revolution' in armed conflict, following on from the advent of gunpowder and nuclear arm. The letter is signed by influential figures from across 26 countries, who warn that automated warfare (pictured) represents a'third revolution' in armed conflict, following on from the advent of gunpowder and nuclear arm If a robot unlawfully kills someone in the heat of battle, who is liable for the death?


Elon Musk leads 116 experts calling for outright ban of killer robots

#artificialintelligence

In their letter, the founders warn the review conference of the convention on conventional weapons that this arms race threatens to usher in the "third revolution in warfare" after gunpowder and nuclear arms. This is not the first time the IJCAI, one of the world's leading AI conferences, has been used as a platform to discuss lethal autonomous weapons systems. It said that the UK was not developing lethal autonomous weapons and that all weapons employed by UK armed forces would be "under human oversight and control". The unmanned combat aerial vehicle, about the size of a BAE Hawk, the plane used by the Red Arrows, had its first test flight in 2013 and is expected to be operational some time after 2030 as part of the Royal Air Force's Future Offensive Air System, destined to replace the human-piloted Tornado GR4 warplanes.


Microsoft co-founder's remote vehicles find a legendary WWII ship

Engadget

A team piloting Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen's research vessel, the R/V Petrel, has found the wreck of the Indianapolis at the bottom of the Philippine Sea. Once it found something, the team used another remotely operated vehicle (the BXL 79) to swoop in and capture the AUV's findings on video. It ends a mystery for the survivors and their families. This isn't Allen's first big expedition (it previously found the wreck of Japan's Musashi and the bell of the HMS Hood), but it suggests that solving additional mysteries is really just a matter of time and effort.


United Nations Should Ban AI-Powered Military Weapons, Elon Musk, AI Experts Urge

International Business Times

Autonomous weapons refer to military devices that utilize artificial intelligence in applications like determining targets to attack or avoid. "We should not lose sight of the fact that, unlike other potential manifestations of AI which still remain in the realm of science fiction, autonomous weapons systems are on the cusp of development right now and have a very real potential to cause significant harm to innocent people along with global instability." For observers like the letter's signees, much of their concern over artificial intelligence isn't about science fiction hypotheticals like Gariepy alludes to. On Musk's part, the Tesla CEO has been a longtime supporter of increased regulation for artificial intelligence research and has regularly argued that, if left unchecked, it could pose a risk to the future of mankind.


Self healing skin brings Terminator robots one step closer

Daily Mail

Now experts have created a synthetic skin that aims to mimic nature's self-repairing abilities, allowing robots to recover from'wounds' sustained while undertaking their duties. Now experts have created a synthetic skin (pictured on robotic hand) that aims to mimic nature's self-repairing abilities To create their synthetic flesh, the scientists used jelly-like polymers that melt into each together when heated and then cooled. Their flexibility allows them to be used for a wide variety of applications, from grabbing delicate and soft objects in the food industry to performing minimally invasive surgery. The flexibility of these soft robots allows them to be used for a wide variety of applications, from grabbing delicate and soft objects in the food industry (pictured) to performing minimally invasive surgery.


Elon Musk leads 116 experts calling for outright ban on killer robots

The Guardian

In their letter, the founders warn the review conference of the convention on conventional weapons that this arms race threatens to usher in the "third revolution in warfare" after gunpowder and nuclear arms. This is not the first time the IJCAI, one of the world's leading AI conferences, has been used as a platform to discuss lethal autonomous weapons systems. It said that the UK was not developing lethal autonomous weapons and that all weapons employed by UK armed forces would be "under human oversight and control". The unmanned combat aerial vehicle, about the size of a BAE Hawk, the plane used by the Red Arrows, saw its first test flight in 2013 and is expected to be operational sometime after 2030 as part of the Royal Air Force's Future Offensive Air System, destined to replace the human-piloted Tornado GR4 warplanes.


Elon Musk leads 116 experts calling for outright ban on killer robots

#artificialintelligence

In their letter, the founders warn the review conference of the Convention on Conventional Weapons that this arms race threatens to usher in the "third revolution in warfare" after gunpowder and nuclear arms. Ryan Gariepy, founder of Clearpath Robotics said: "Unlike other potential manifestations of AI which still remain in the realm of science fiction, autonomous weapons systems are on the cusp of development right now and have a very real potential to cause significant harm to innocent people along with global instability." This is not the first time the IJCAI, one of the world's leading AI conferences, has been used as a platform to discuss lethal autonomous weapons systems. The unmanned combat aerial vehicle, about the size of a BAE Hawk, the plane used by the Red Arrows, saw its first test flight in 2013 and is expected to be operational sometime after 2030 as part of the Royal Air Force's Future Offensive Air System, destined to replace the human-piloted Tornado GR4 warplanes.


UK: Palestine activists face prison over Elbit protest

Al Jazeera

A group of Palestinian activists in the UK could be imprisoned after a protest outside a factory owned by a subsidiary of Israeli drone manufacturer, Elbit Systems. Operations at the UAV Engines Ltd plant were shutdown for two days starting July 6 with protesters laying out mock coffins outside the factory and laying on the ground outside its gates. Defence lawyer Mike Schwarz said: "An issue at trial is likely to be the lawfulness of [Elbit and UAV Engine's] activity in its factory." The company's customers include the Israeli army, US Air Force, and the British Royal Air Force.