Cognimates with Stefania Druga

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Stefania Druga will present her work on Cognimates, a new open source platform that allows users to create, play and learn with and about AI through games, robot training and many other activities.


We are moving towards the 'AI of everything'

#artificialintelligence

AI is a hotly debated topic in every conversation, so much so that we have moved from saying'there is an app for that' to'there is an AI for that'. Oliver Schabenberger, chief operating officer and chief technology officer at SAS, observes how AI has permeated everyday discourse in recent years. Yet, AI has not always been talked about this way. An overhype of the technology led to'AI winter' in the 1980s, he says in his keynote at the Analytics Experience conference this week in Milan. During cocktail gatherings, saying one worked in AI could kill a conversation.


Let's Make Artificial Intelligence 'Boring' Again

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"I think we are in fact building this AI-first enterprise this technology will find its way into many fundamental processes of the businesses that we all run," she said. "So when I say let's make it boring, I actually think that's what makes it more exciting." There isn't anything magical or mysterious about AI, Mason emphasizes. AI is "computer programs that are built on top of data that improves with the introduction of more data into those systems and feedback loops. We are not talking about some actual recreation of human intelligence there's some kind of you know science fiction-type thing."


Tempted to expense a strip club as a work dinner? AI is watching

#artificialintelligence

One employee traveling for work checked his dog into a kennel and billed it to his boss as a hotel expense. Another charged yoga classes to the corporate credit card as client entertainment. A third, after racking up a small fortune at a strip club, submitted the expense as a steakhouse business dinner. These bogus expenses, which occurred recently at major U.S. companies, have one thing in common: All were exposed by artificial intelligence algorithms that can in a matter of seconds sniff out fraudulent claims and forged receipts that are often undetectable to human auditors--certainly not without hours of tedious labor. AppZen, an 18-month-old AI accounting startup, has already signed up several big companies, including Amazon.com Inc., International Business Machine Corp., Salesforce.com


Google's takeover of health app appears to renege on DeepMind promises

New Scientist

Another tech company doing something it said it wouldn't. Another eye roll, another shrug? On Tuesday, the London-based artificial intelligence company DeepMind announced that the team behind Streams – an app designed to monitor people in hospital with kidney disease – will be joining DeepMind's sister company Google. The tech giant wants to turn Streams into an AI-powered assistant for doctors and nurses. To create Streams, DeepMind used identifiable medical records of 1.6 million people obtained in a deal with the Royal …


An AI apocalypse isn't the problem – technology-driven inequality is

New Scientist

ONE of the biggest potential impacts of artificial intelligence is often overlooked. Rather than the frequently touted extremes of technological utopia or an end to humanity, AI could entrench and deepen the status quo, intensifying business as usual by ramping up overconsumption and inequality. For many scientists, this is a big concern. Scientists for Global Responsibility, a campaign group for scientists and engineers that I work for, recently surveyed its 750 members about AI's effects on the future.


A bottom-up view of the state

MIT News

An endless wait in a crowded room. The official's impassive expression while handling a client in need. Exasperating and sometimes infuriating public service bureaucracies are things with which Bernardo Zacka '05, a newly-appointed assistant professor of political science, is well acquainted. "These are episodes where you feel powerless, where the authority you're dealing with doesn't appear to be a person," he says. "One's impression is dealing with the rule of nobody. But even then of course, you are still dealing with someone."


Baglietto, Saxe, and Shoulders ensure grad students thrive

MIT News

The journey through graduate school is rarely straight and smooth. There are challenges and setbacks, students experience varying degrees of doubt and struggle, and many redefine their goals along the way. On this winding path, the guidance of a mentor can make all the difference to a student's sanity and success. Professors Emilio Baglietto, Rebecca Saxe, and Matthew Shoulders were nominated by their graduate students as models of great mentorship, and are among the current slate of honorees for Committed to Caring (C2C). Professor Emilio Baglietto's "unparalleled enthusiasm" for teaching is both contagious and formative of his students' academic development, his advisees say.


Ford and Walmart to partner on self-driving deliveries

Engadget

Self-driving car collaborations are becoming increasingly commonplace. The latest team-up comes from Ford and Walmart -- two older-world companies using autonomous tech to combat nascent startup rivals and remain relevant in an ever-changing landscape. The eventual goal is to bring Walmart shopping items to customers in a self-driving Ford with the help of Postmates' delivery infrastructure. Initially, however, the venture will rely on human-driven cars designed to simulate how a self-driving vehicle would operate. Ford has already started testing its autonomous cars in Miami and Washington DC, with plans for commercial production by 2021.


Hover 2 foldable drone can look for obstacles as it flies itself

Engadget

The Hover Camera Passport foldable drone made quite the impression when it first launched a little over two years ago, and then it received a major update in April last year, which added a smartphone-free mode that automatically tracks and records its owner. Save for the rumored Snap acquisition deal (which Zero Zero Robotics still denies today), we had barely heard from the drone maker since then, but today it's back with a surprise announcement: The launch of its second selfie drone, Hover 2. As you'd expect, the Hover 2 has inherited all the best bits of the Passport, especially its small foldable form factor, sturdy carbon fibre cage enclosure, Qualcomm Snapdragon processor (model not specified but it's "four times more powerful than" before), 4K 30fps video capture, face tracking and body tracking. The two drones look similar from afar, though the newer model benefits from more than double the original flight time, jumping from a mere 10 minutes to 19 minutes (but maximum flight time is 23 minutes; more on that later). This may explain the heavier weight of 490 grams or about 1.1 pounds -- almost twice as much as before. When switched on, you'll notice a new major feature on the Hover 2: Its swiveling "Optical Radar" that pops out of the top of the body.