PCWorld


Go grab an 8GB Radeon RX 570 for $160 at Newegg and get three free games too

PCWorld

Sometimes you find a graphics card deal that's just too good to pass up. Today's that day: Newegg is selling the 8GB MSI RX 570 Armor OC for $160Remove non-product link. As with most Newegg graphics card deals, you'll need to remember to apply for a $30 rebate, but it's still one of the best prices we've ever seen for an 8GB RX 570 card. In fact, it's just $10 more expensive (after the rebate) than a $150 4GB RX 570 deal we recommended earlier in October. Today's deal ends on Wednesday, October 24.


Save 85% On The Complete Arduino Starter Kit & Course Bundle

PCWorld

Home robotics is quite popular because of the accessibility and ease-of-use of micro-controllers like Arduino, and the increasing popularity of IoT devices in smart homes has only expanded the hobby even further. With Arduino, you can light your home, control LCD screens, build robots, and more; this Complete Arduino Starter Kit & Course bundle has guides on how to do this and more for $89.99. If you're new to Arduino and programming in general, it's best to start out with levels one through three of Crazy About Arduino: End-to-End Workshop. These guides introduce the basics of Arduino, such as control statements, sketching, and variables. There are plenty of hands-on projects in levels one through three; these include controlling the speed and brightness of LEDs to make animation waves, programming an ultrasonic distance sensor, and creating a buzzer alarm.


EVGA GeForce RTX 2070 XC review: Cheaper and more feature-packed than Nvidia's Founders Edition

PCWorld

EVGA's custom GeForce RTX 2070 XC graphics card is cooler, more customizable, and just as fast as Nvidia's RTX 2070 Founders Edition. It's packing dedicated hardware for real-time ray tracing and AI-enhanced graphics. That shouldn't be a big deal. Nvidia's Founders Edition cards were designed to be premium priced halo(ish) models, right? But when the GeForce RTX 2080 and 2080 Ti released last month, third-party board makers like EVGA, Asus, and MSI treated the premium pricing of the Founders Edition models as the cost floor rather than a cost ceiling.


Reolink Argus Pro review: a completely wireless indoor/outdoor security camera for modest budgets

PCWorld

Reolink has effectively filled a void with its Argus line of affordable, no-frills, wireless indoor/outdoor security cameras. The Argus Pro is its latest offering, but it's not a premium model as you might expect given the name. In fact, it lacks a few features of the original Argus cameras--though you likely won't miss them--and, at just $100, it actually costs a bit less. Having reviewed the Argus 2, using the Argus Pro was a case of deja vu all over again. The cameras have virtually identical features: 1080p live streaming and recording, a 130-degree field of view, two-way audio, and PIR motion detection.


Google Pixel 3 XL review: Winning the game by rewriting the rules

PCWorld

After spending nearly a week with the Pixel 3 XL, my three first impressions of Google's newest handset haven't changed: It's the fastest Android phone I've ever used. The notch is an eyesore. Thankfully, the first two qualities make up for the third. If the Pixel 3 XL didn't have such an ostentatious notch, it would still be an ugly phone, but after a couple days I wouldn't have cared anymore. Six days later, the notch is still the first thing my eyes go to every time I unlock my phone.


Caavo Control Center review: This universal remote unifies not just your devices but your streaming services, too

PCWorld

A rectangular black box that sits in your entertainment center: It sure does look like another streaming box competitor, but it's important to understand that the Caavo Control Center isn't that at all. It's a universal remote control that takes a wholly different approach than those used by Logitech. This is actually Caavo's second run at this concept. The first was a wildly innovative (and pricy) crowd-funded system designed to be NORAD for your entertainment system; you plugged everything into the Caavo, then controlled it all with its custom remote. With eight HDMI ports, two USB ports, and more, the $400 device was clad in steel and decked out in fancy wood, built to be an eye-catching showstopper.


Assassin's Creed: Odyssey's hidden Historical Locations map is stuffed with Ancient Greek lore

PCWorld

I don't know why the developers made that decision, although the map is certainly cluttered enough without these Historical Locations. It's too bad you could play through the whole of Assassin's Creed: Odyssey ($60 on Humble) without stumbling on this other layer though. There's a lot of interesting historical information contained within, and a lot of great pseudo-historical information as well--insight into the Ancient Greece of Odyssey that explains how and why it differs from the strictly historical Ancient Greece we might know.


iDevices Thermostat review: This inexpensive smart thermostat works with Alexa, Google Assistant, and Siri, too

PCWorld

Smart thermostats have been dropping in price steadily as more players enter the market, so there's really no reason to install a dumb model these days. But if you're working with a tight budget, and don't mind giving up some of the fancier features the top-shelf models offer, this one from iDevices works with all three of the major digital assistants--Alexa, Google Assistant, and Siri--and it can be integrated into Apple's HomeKit ecosystem, too. It's not the slickest or most feature-rich thermostat you'll find, and doesn't offer the highest build quality--heck, it doesn't even have a trademarked name--but you can pick one up on Amazon for about $100. Outfitted with a tiny, 2-inch, color LED display inside a glossy white enclosure, iDevices assumes you'll manage it with either voice commands via a smart speaker or with its mobile app. It can control one- and two-stage heating, heat pump, and cooling systems; and ventilation fans.


Google Home Hub hands on: Is there an Echo in here?

PCWorld

With a 7-inch widescreen display, you'd think the Google Home Hub wouldn't fit on your nightstand. And it'll leave plenty of room for a Pixel Stand, too. I don't usually start off hands-on stories with price, but it's worth mentioning right at the top: The Google Home Hub, with its 7-inch touchscreen display, is just $149. Granted, these aren't apples-to-apples comparisons--the screen size is three inches bigger on the Show, for example--but when people are shopping for a smart speaker with a screen, a few inches here and there won't matter. And the price tag will make the Google Home Hub hard to pass up.


Google Home Hub: Top 5 features, and how it stacks up to Echo Show

PCWorld

Google keeps secrets when it wants to (e.g., the Google security flaw it discovered earlier this year), so all the "leaks" leading up to today's announcement of its new Google Home Hub smart display were likely engineered to dissuade people from pre-ordering Amazon's second-generation Echo Show, which goes on sale next week. We like the new Echo Show--a lot. We haven't laid hands on the Google Home Hub yet, but the following five features are the ones we find the most interesting. JBL is the biggest loser here, considering that it sells its 8-inch smart display, the JBL Link View, for $250. Lenovo's 8-inch Smart Display, meanwhile, is priced at $200, and its 10-inch model sells for $250.