STRATEGY


Google's artificial intelligence computer 'no longer constrained by limits of human knowledge'

FOX News

The computer that stunned humanity by beating the best mortal players at a strategy board game requiring "intuition" has become even smarter, its creators claim. Even more startling, the updated version of AlphaGo is entirely self-taught -- a major step towards the rise of machines that achieve superhuman abilities "with no human input", they reported in the science journal Nature. Dubbed AlphaGo Zero, the Artificial Intelligence (AI) system learnt by itself, within days, to master the ancient Chinese board game known as "Go" -- said to be the most complex two-person challenge ever invented. It came up with its own, novel moves to eclipse all the Go acumen humans have acquired over thousands of years. After just three days of self-training it was put to the ultimate test against AlphaGo, its forerunner which previously dethroned the top human champs.


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#artificialintelligence

Last year the UAE got a Minister of Happiness, and now, in another world first, the country has a Minister of Artificial Intelligence – an acknowledgement by the Emirates that these are the technologies that are going to change the world around us, and quickly. H.H. Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, Vice President of the UAE and ruler of Dubai, announced a full cabinet reshuffle today, and as part of that 27-year-old Omar Bin Sultan Al Olama has been announced as the Minister of AI. Al Olama has been working as the Deputy Director of the Future Department for just over a year now, and he has been on the Executive Committee of the World Government Summit since 2014. He has a BBA from the American University of Dubai, and a diploma of excellence and project management from the American University in Sharjah. Well, they plan to use AI to not only streamline costs, but to also bolster education and a desire to learn; to reduce accidents on the roads; and to create savings in the energy industry.


Exclusive: Infosys "re-imagining" tennis using AI Access AI

@machinelearnbot

Infosys, a global leader in technology services and consulting, is aiming to reinvent the way people consume sport using extensive player data. The Indian firm, which had revenues of $9.5 billion in its last financial year, demonstrated its'Infosys Information Platform (IIP)' during the recent ATP Tennis tournament in London, of which it was a headline sponsor. Speaking to Access AI, the firm's head of energy and services for Europe Mohamed Anis, who joined in 2000, said Infosys uses machine learning to analyse historical data on player performance, which in turn is able to predict behaviour, shot selection, and even a probabilistic outcome of the match itself. Anis (pictured) said the data is delivered in real time and can be used to help spectators view the game/match on an entirely different level – comparable to that of the coach. "Tennis has been around for a very long time," explained Anis.


Google's AlphaGo Zero taught itself to become the greatest Go player in history

Mashable

Google's DeepMind lab has built an artificially intelligent program that taught itself to become one of the world's most dominant Go players. Google says the program, AlphaGo Zero, endowed itself with "superhuman abilities," learning strategies previously unknown to humans. AlphaGo Zero started out with no clue how to win the game Go -- a 2,500-year old Chinese game in which two players use black and white tiles to capture more territory than their opponents. It took AlphaGo Zero just three days to beat an earlier AI program (AlphaGo Lee), which had resoundingly beaten world champion Lee Sedol in 2016. After 21 days of playing, AlphaGo Zero defeated AlphaGo Master, an intelligent program known for beating 60 top pros online and another world champion player in 2017.


Newest version of self-taught, 'superhuman' AI now even smarter: makers

The Japan Times

PARIS – The updated version of the computer that stunned humanity by beating the best mortal players at a strategy board game requiring intuition has become even smarter, its makers said Wednesday. Even more startling, the new version of AlphaGo is entirely self-taught -- a major step toward the rise of machines that achieve superhuman abilities "with no human input," they reported in the science journal Nature. Dubbed AlphaGo Zero, the artificial intelligence system learned by itself, within days, to master the ancient Chinese board game known as go -- said to be the most complex two-person game ever invented. It came up with its own, novel moves to eclipse all the go acumen that humans have acquired over thousands of years. After just three days of self-training, it was put to the ultimate test against its forerunner AlphaGo, which had dethroned the top human champs.


New AlphaGo AI learns without help from humans

#artificialintelligence

What's new: AlphaGo's initial iteration was trained on a database of human Go games whereas the newer AlphaGo Zero's artificial neural networks use the current state of the game as input. Through trial and error and feedback in the form of winning, the AI learned how to play. It then used that same network to choose its next move whereas AlphaGo used a separate network. This reinforcement learning strategy, which was used extensively by AlphaGo as well, has its roots in psychology: the neural network learns from rewards like humans do. The DeepMind researchers wrote: "the self-learned player performed much better overall, defeating the human-trained player within the first 24h of training.


AI-first marketing could help brands perfect the customer experience

#artificialintelligence

In the midst of all the hype about artificial intelligence, you may occasionally pause to ask: "What's new here?" After all, did we not have machine learning applications 10 (or maybe even 20) years ago? In the marketing domain specifically, you may be asking how today's AI is different from, say, an application that has been personalizing real-time content insertion for several years. Do you have an AI strategy -- or hoping to get one? Check out VB Summit on October 23-24 in Berkeley, a high-level, invite-only AI event for business leaders.


Self-taught, 'superhuman' AI now even smarter: makers

#artificialintelligence

The computer that stunned humanity by beating the best mortal players at a strategy board game requiring "intuition" has become even smarter, its makers said Wednesday. Even more startling, the updated version of AlphaGo is entirely self-taught--a major step towards the rise of machines that achieve superhuman abilities "with no human input", they reported in the science journal Nature. Dubbed AlphaGo Zero, the Artificial Intelligence (AI) system learnt by itself, within days, to master the ancient Chinese board game known as "Go"--said to be the most complex two-person challenge ever invented. It came up with its own, novel moves to eclipse all the Go acumen humans have acquired over thousands of years. After just three days of self-training it was put to the ultimate test against AlphaGo, its forerunner which previously dethroned the top human champs.


Tillerson pushes for stronger ties with India while chiding China

The Japan Times

WASHINGTON – Secretary of State Rex Tillerson called Wednesday for the U.S. and India to expand strategic ties. He also pointedly criticized China, which he accused of challenging international norms needed for global stability. Tillerson's remarks on relations between the world's two largest democracies, ahead of his first trip to South Asia as secretary of state, risked endearing Washington to one Asian power while alienating another. Tillerson said the world needed the U.S. and India to have a strong partnership. He said the two nations share goals of security, free navigation, free trade and fighting terrorism in the Indo-Pacific, and serve as "the Eastern and Western beacons" for an international rules-based order that is increasingly under strain.


Can Corporate Chatbots Survive AI?

#artificialintelligence

We read a lot of news about chatbots reshaping entire industry sectors by utilizing artificial intelligence (AI), machine learning and natural language processing. Some chatbots are good in assisting consumers in buying tickets or finding good food nearby. Others can keep a simple conversation alive or replace traditional FAQ pages. What most media pundits miss, however, is that such a capability is nowhere near general AI potential, which casts doubts over the very future of chatbots. For start, chatbots are of two basic types: conversational and goal-oriented.