soccer


Robotic soccer during RoboCup Asia-Pacific 2017

USATODAY

More than 1,000 students from 25 countries with more than 130 team will participate in the four-day contest of the region's first robot competition. The event is held to encourage global robotics research and development.


How data and machine learning are changing European football - Which-50

@machinelearnbot

Netherlands-based data intelligence company SciSports is hoping to change world football through data, motion tracking and machine learning. Using data and machine learning, the company produces a "SciSkill Index" – an objective ranking of current ability, potential and influence of thousands of footballers across hundreds of different competitions around the world. The score is determined by the SciSports' existing data library and from 3D data collected from stadium cameras, which converts movements in practice or during the match into useful information in real time. "It is the first system that allows you to compare James Troisi with Neymar and check if Milos Degenek has the potential to become as good as David Luiz," a company spokesperson told Which-50. "This will enable clubs to increase their scouting scope, decrease their risk of signing the wrong player and enlarge the change of finding the right talent."


How data and machine learning are changing European football - Which-50

#artificialintelligence

Netherlands-based data intelligence company SciSports is hoping to change world football through data, motion tracking and machine learning. Using data and machine learning, the company produces a "SciSkill Index" – an objective ranking of current ability, potential and influence of thousands of footballers across hundreds of different competitions around the world. The score is determined by the SciSports' existing data library and from 3D data collected from stadium cameras, which converts movements in practice or during the match into useful information in real time. "It is the first system that allows you to compare James Troisi with Neymar and check if Milos Degenek has the potential to become as good as David Luiz," a company spokesperson told Which-50. "This will enable clubs to increase their scouting scope, decrease their risk of signing the wrong player and enlarge the change of finding the right talent."


Hamlet iCub and Other Humanoid Robots in Photos

IEEE Spectrum Robotics Channel

As part of the IEEE RAS International Conference on Humanoid Robots in Birmingham, U.K., last month, the awards committee decided to organize a fun photo contest. Participants submitted 39 photos showing off their humanoids in all kinds of poses and places. I was happy to be one of the judges, along with Sabine Hauert from the University of Bristol and Robohub, and with Giorgio Metta, the conference's awards chair, overseeing our selection. All photos were posted on Facebook and Twitter, and users were invited to vote on them. Sabine and I then looked at the photos with the most votes and scored them for originality, creativity, photo structure, and tech or fun factor.


Books: Best Books of 2017, Andy Weir, American Airstream contradictions and more

Los Angeles Times

I'm LA Times books editor Carolyn Kellogg, bringing you the Best Books of the year and more this week. For the first time since 1931, we have released a list of our Best Books of the Year. See what made the cut to be included in 2017's best fiction and 2017's best nonfiction. In print, both of those lists appear in our special Holiday Books pull-out section, which you'll find nestled within Sunday's Arts & Books. The holiday books gift guide includes audiobooks, coffee table books, books for kids and teens and fun books for stocking stuffers -- 125 titles in all.


Can Soccer-Playing Robots Kick It? Yes They Can!

WIRED

The world may not agree 100 percent on what to call it, but we can all agree that soccer/football is indeed the Beautiful Game. Not just from an individual athleticism standpoint, but also the teamwork: Soccer is a lovely ballet, only with more kicking and tripping and hooliganism. Which makes the robots of the RoboCup all the more impressive. They look a bit like mini Daleks, but they're way more chill and way better at soccer. Individually, they sense their world and scoot around and snag the ball and kick it, which is grand.


Model Training with Yufeng Guo

#artificialintelligence

Play in new window Download Multiagent systems involve the interaction of autonomous agents that may be acting independently or in collaboration with each other. Examples of these systems include financial markets, robot soccer matches, and automated warehouses. Today's guest Peter Stone is a professor of computer science who specializies in multiagent systems and robotics.


Heading a soccer ball might hurt women's brains more than men's

Popular Science

Repeatedly putting your head in the path of a fast-moving projectile isn't everyone's idea of a good time, but it's par for the course for soccer players. They might hurl their foreheads toward the soccer ball dozens of times during a single practice or game. But playing with your head can hurt your brain. The technique known as "heading" causes damage to the brain's white matter, and it does more damage to women than it does to men, according to research on amateur soccer players presented this week at the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience. Similar amounts of heading appeared to cause changes in more areas of the female brain, and a greater overall volume of their brains were damaged.


Remembering and honoring the life of undergraduate Henoch Argaw

MIT News

In the 3rd grade, Henoch Argaw began tutoring his fellow students at Southeast Christian Academy Elementary School in Colorado. "He told me and Sehin [his mother] that he was writing a math instruction book," recalls Neway Argaw, his father. "By that time, he was already attending 5th grade [level] math and science courses." Their son continued tutoring all the way through high school and also took up a related pursuit, refereeing and coaching youth soccer for the Colorado Storm and other Colorado soccer clubs. He was also a competitive chess player and played the trumpet since 4th grade.


ai-sumo-wrestlers-could-make-future-robots-more-nimble

WIRED

Igor Mordatch, a researcher at OpenAI, says such competitions create a kind of intelligence arms race, as AI agents confront complex, changing conditions posed by their opponents. One possible route to more skillful AI is reinforcement learning, where software uses trial and error to work toward a particular goal. OpenAI's researchers built RoboSumo because they think the extra complexity generated by competition could allow faster progress than just giving reinforcement learning software more complex problems to solve alone. But some of OpenAI's experiments suggest skills learned in one virtual arena transfer to other situations.