harvest


How machine learning can help farmers manage the unpredictable

#artificialintelligence

A deluge of rain during the 2017 harvest saw farmers' profits slashed overnight – wheat for milling and barley for malting were downgraded and producers incurred additional costs for drying. Incidents like this show that few industries have more at stake than agriculture, and so much to gain from ac...


981

AI Magazine

Prairie Virtual Systems Corp. (Chicago, Ill.) has developed a barrier-free design virtual reality system that checks building access. The system, which helps designers meet the requirements of the American with Disabilities Act, assists in the design of interiors that are accessible and safe. It allows users to travel through a virtual world that simulates a proposed interior environment. United Technologies Corp. (Hartford, Conn.) has developed intelligent maintenance aiding technology to reduce operation and support costs and increase the availability of complex equipment, systems and processes. The company is applying AI and expert systems technology in the development, manufacture and support of products using a patented AI technique called qualitative reasoning, which compares faulty operations to knowledge about how a system normally operates.


Robots could be used on farms by 2020

Daily Mail

Farmers could soon be given a helping hand to harvest their vegetables - in the form of robots. Scientists are developing farm robots that don't harvest crops until they are perfect, eradicating wonky and inedible vegetable. And it may not be long before we see the robots hitting fields, with experts predicting they could be used as early as 2020. Scientists are developing farm robots that don't harvest crops until they are perfect, which could be used as early as 2020 Engineers are working on machines that can autonomously plant seeds, weed, water and spray without a farmer. The robots can also be programmed to only pick crops where they are perfectly ripe.


The Farms of the Future Will Be Automated From Seed to Harvest

@machinelearnbot

Swarms of drones buzz overhead, while robotic vehicles crawl across the landscape. Orbiting satellites snap high-resolution images of the scene far below. Not one human being can be seen in the pre-dawn glow spreading across the land. This isn't some post-apocalyptic vision of the future à la The Terminator. This is a snapshot of the farm of the future.


The physics keeping Star Wars' Cloud City afloat

Popular Science

Star Wars provides us with a perfect example of a science fiction floating city: Cloud City. Cloud City has an atypical backstory. Floating above the surface of the planet Bespin, the city was specifically designed to harvest tibanna gas rather than to house a displaced population. Tibanna gas is used in all kinds of technology in the Star Wars galaxy, including, but not limited to, blasters and repulsorlifts. Being one of the few sources of the gas, Cloud City enjoys financial success from its mining operations.


Microsoft offers AI tools to help researchers protect the oceans

@machinelearnbot

The most promising concepts, which use AI to push the boundaries of their research, are granted AI and cloud computing resources on Microsoft's Azure platform. Microsoft said it's already awarded $235,000 in Azure computing resources to 20 successful AI for Earth applicants worldwide. "We are excited about our new AI for Earth grantees and our new EU Oceans Award, and look forward to expanding the success of the many projects we are supporting to better understand and manage Earth's many ecosystems, both on land and in the water." Microsoft will provide the accepted proposal with access to Azure services for IoT, data analytics and machine learning, enabling deeper research into the world's ocean environments.


How the albatross can fly 500 miles with just a few flaps

Daily Mail

The birds have a large wingspan of up to 11 feet (3.4 meters) across to catch and ride the wind, and soar and dive between contrasting currents of air, a flight pattern called dynamic soaring - comparable to riding a sidewinding rollercoaster. The birds have a large wingspan of up to 11 feet (3.4 meters) across to catch and ride the wind, and soar and dive between contrasting currents of air, a flight pattern called dynamic soaring - comparable to riding a sidewinding rollercoaster. Th team's project was inspired in part by contests of dynamic soaring: when competitors launch gliders from atop mountains and track the speed of each glider as it drives down, soars up, then doubles back and dives down again in a loop, propelled by the winds. Th team's project was inspired in part by contests of dynamic soaring: when competitors launch gliders from atop mountains and track the speed of each glider as it drives down, soars up, then doubles back and dives down again in a loop, propelled by the winds'One way to look at it is that, at each crossing between the slow and fast layers, some airspeed is gained,' Bousquet explains.


AI for Earth and Our Oceans - Microsoft Green Blog

#artificialintelligence

We are also announcing, today, a new AI for Earth EU Oceans Award, which is an extension of our grants program to a particularly important topic area – our oceans. John Frank, Microsoft's Vice President of European Union Government Affairs, is attending that conference and announced the new AI for Earth EU Oceans Award, dedicated to providing Azure compute resources and AI tools to European-based research organizations that work on ocean-related challenges. That system helped local oyster farmers at Taylor Shellfish improve their shellfish harvests by carefully monitoring ocean chemistry to prevent the sudden loss of "seed" crops that's caused by ocean acidification. We are excited about our new AI for Earth grantees and our new EU Oceans Award, and look forward to expanding the success of the many projects we are supporting to better understand and manage Earth's many ecosystems, both on land and in the water.


How John Deere's New AI Lab Is Designing Farm Equipment For A More Sustainable Future

#artificialintelligence

The company spent $305 million to acquire Blue River Technology, a startup with computer vision and machine learning technology that can identify weeds–making it possible to spray herbicides only where they're needed. "What Blue River Technology allows us to do is move to the plant level, and start managing at that plant level," says Alex Purdy, director of John Deere Labs. Now, using computer vision tech to identify and spray only weeds, farmers can switch to other herbicides–including, potentially, organic herbicides that the weeds haven't evolved to resist (and that might otherwise kill the cotton, if they were sprayed everywhere). Computer vision and machine learning technology can also be used in every other step of farming: tilling soil, planting seeds in the optimal locations, spraying fertilizer or nutrients, and harvesting.


autonomous-robots-plant-tend-and-harvest-entire-crop-of-barley?utm_source=feedburner-robotics&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+IeeeSpectrumRobotics+%28IEEE+Spectrum%3A+Robotics%29

IEEE Spectrum Robotics Channel

During the Hands Free Hectare project, no human set foot on the field between planting and harvest--everything was done by robots. To make these decisions, robot scouts (including drones and ground robots) surveyed the field from time to time, sending back measurements and bringing back samples for humans to have a look at from the comfort of someplace warm and dry and clean. With fully autonomous farm vehicles, you can use a bunch of smaller ones much more effectively than a few larger ones, which is what the trend has been toward if you need a human sitting in the driver's seat. Robots are only going to get more affordable and efficient at this sort of thing, and our guess is that it won't be long before fully autonomous farming passes conventional farming methods in both overall output and sustainability.