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A Convincing Eminem Deepfake Disses Mark Zuckerberg On A New Song

#artificialintelligence

Deepfake audio technology is becoming incredibly convincing, so much so that Jay-Z apparently took legal action against an AI-powered impersonation of him this year. Eminem is the latest rapper to receive the deepfake treatment, and in a new digitally fabricated song, he goes after Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg. The video was created by YouTube channel Calamity AI in partnership with another YouTuber, 30HZ. Calamity AI explains the song, "An Eminem diss-track written by Artificial Intelligence. We inputted the title'Mark Zuckerberg Diss in the Style of Eminem' and let the A.I. write the rest. From there, we sent the lyrics to 30HZ, who synthesized and created the vocals. The audio was not record by Eminem."


Facebook says AI has fueled a hate speech crackdown

#artificialintelligence

Facebook says it is proactively detecting more hate speech using artificial intelligence. A new transparency report released on Thursday offers greater detail on social media hate following policy changes earlier this year, although it leaves some big questions unanswered. Facebook's quarterly report includes new information about hate speech prevalence. The company estimates that 0.10 to 0.11 percent of what Facebook users see violates hate speech rules, equating to "10 to 11 views of hate speech for every 10,000 views of content." That's based on a random sample of posts and measures the reach of content rather than pure post count, capturing the effect of hugely viral posts.


How 2020 transformed big tech: the story of Facebook, QAnon and the world's slackening grip on reality

The Guardian

As with many others in Britain, lockdown hit Rachel and her husband, Philip, hard. Almost overnight, the couple, both in their early 50s, found themselves cut off from friends, family and colleagues. Before the Covid-19 outbreak, they had both been working every day; now Philip found himself furloughed, while Rachel was put on rotation with other essential staff, working fewer shifts at odd hours. They were unable to meet up with their four adult sons and daughters. They had to attend a family funeral while remaining socially distanced. Initially, Rachel coped in the way many others did. She played more video games than normal, and felt stressed at work, but as far as possible she managed. For him, it seemed there must be more to it than the authorities struggling to cope with a novel virus and evolving expert advice. "The regularly changing and conflicting information that was coming from the government added to the feeling in him that they were making things up or covering something up," Rachel says now. Initially, Philip and Rachel (their names have been changed for this article) discussed his fears, but as lockdown went on, their conversations stopped. Philip was frustrated that Rachel wasn't taking his concerns seriously: someone had to be benefiting from the situation, he insisted, and events such as Dominic Cummings' Barnard Castle "eye test" only increased his belief that "they" knew the pandemic was fake, and the nation was being kept indoors for a more sinister purpose.


Congress and technology: Do lawmakers understand Google and Facebook enough to regulate them?

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

Many of us have had the feeling that technology, which continues to change at an ever-dizzying pace, may be leaving us behind. That was embodied this past week during a Congressional hearing, nominally convened to investigate antitrust concerns of four big tech titans: Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Google. While the five-and-a-half-hour inquiry touched on a range topics from pesky spam filters and search results to how companies approached acquisitions, the House Judiciary subcommittee hearing laid one thing bare: A sizable disconnect appears to exist between the technology Americans are using and depending on in their daily lives and the knowledge base of people with the power and responsibility to decide its future and regulation. "Consumers and investors walk away feeling like a lot of these lawmakers don't really understand the business models to an extent that they could then navigate them and put laws in place that will dictate the future of where they go," said Daniel Ives, an analyst with Wedbush Securities. The antitrust subcommittee hearing had been convened to look into the tech giants' market dominance.


Tech titans to defend American success stories

#artificialintelligence

Leaders of the world's four most powerful companies will defend the Internet giants, painting them as US success stories in a fiercely competitive world during a major antitrust hearing Wednesday. The unprecedented hearing will feature chief executives Jeff Bezos of Amazon, Tim Cook of Apple, Mark Zuckerberg of Facebook and Sundar Pichai of Google and its parent firm Alphabet. The CEOs will testify remotely at the hearing, which comes less than 100 days before the US election. Zuckerberg is to say that the internet giant would not have succeeded without US laws fostering competition, but that the rules of the internet now need updating. "Facebook is a proudly American company," Zuckerberg said in prepared remarks ahead of what will be a closely watched House Judiciary Committee hearing.


Tech titans to defend record as American success stories

The Japan Times

San Francisco – Leaders of the world's four most powerful companies will defend the internet giants in Congress, painting them as U.S. success stories in a fiercely competitive world during a major antitrust hearing Wednesday. The unprecedented hearing will feature chief executives Jeff Bezos of Amazon, Tim Cook of Apple, Mark Zuckerberg of Facebook and Sundar Pichai of Google and its parent firm Alphabet. The CEOs will testify remotely at the hearing, which comes less than 100 days before the U.S. election. Zuckerberg is to say that the internet giant would not have succeeded without U.S. laws fostering competition, but that the rules of the internet now need updating. "Facebook is a proudly American company," Zuckerberg said in prepared remarks ahead of what will be a closely watched House Judiciary Committee hearing.


How do you control an AI as powerful as OpenAI's GPT-3?

#artificialintelligence

The world has a new AI toy, and it's called GPT-3. The latest iteration of OpenAI's text generating model has left many starstruck by its abilities – although its hype may be too much. GPT-3 is a machine learning system that has been fed 45TB of text data, an unprecedented amount. All that training allows it to generate sorts of written content: stories, code, legal jargon, all based on just a few input words or sentences. And the beta test has already produced some jaw-dropping results.


Dozens of Zuckerberg-funded scientists attack Facebook over its stance on Trump posts

The Independent - Tech

Dozens of scientists funded by Mark Zuckerberg have protested against his decision to leave inflammatory Donald Trump posts on the site. Mr Zuckerberg is allowing the president to use the social network to "spread both misinformation and incendiary statements", the researchers warn. Scientists, including 60 professors at leading US research institutions, wrote to the Facebook boss asking Mr Zuckerberg to "consider stricter policies on misinformation and incendiary language that harms people," especially during the current turmoil over racial injustice. The letter calls the spread of "deliberate misinformation and divisive language" contrary to the researchers' goals of using technology to prevent and eradicate disease, improve childhood education and reform the criminal justice system. Their mission "is antithetical to some of the stances that Facebook has been taking, so we're encouraging them to be more on the side of truth and on the right side of history as we've said in the letter," said Debora Marks of Harvard Medical School, one of three professors who organised it.


The Morning After: Alexa's new 'Drop In' intercom system

Engadget

For what is probably the lightest news you'll read today, Amazon's new feature for Alexa turns any connected devices into walkie-talkies. While they could already easily send messages from one device to another, now you can ask Alexa to "Drop In Everywhere" and get a live line to all the devices in your house, useful for finding out who wants what on their pizza or getting someone to check for a package at the front door. Just… don't activate it by accident? Researchers have combined biometrics from Oura rings with AI prediction models to detect COVID-19 symptoms up to three days early with, they claim, over 90 percent accuracy. It sounds pretty incredible, but the science isn't just about wearing a bit of tech on your finger.


Mark Zuckerberg meets EU officials as bloc's new tech rules loom

The Japan Times

LONDON – Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg met top European Union officials on a visit to Brussels on Monday, days before the bloc is expected to release new proposals on regulating artificial intelligence. The billionaire social network founder is the latest U.S. tech executive to make the trip to the headquarters of the EU, which is becoming an increasingly important player in technology regulation. Zuckerberg's visit came as the company warned that potential regulation risked stifling innovation. Zuckerberg met Margrethe Vestager, the EU's powerful executive vice president in charge of making Europe "fit for the digital age." He also had audiences with Thierry Breton, commissioner for the internal market, and Vera Jourova, vice president for values and transparency.