veteran


IBM Watson Health extends partnership with US to help vets with cancer

ZDNet

IBM on Thursday said it's extending its partnership with the US Department of Veterans Affairs to apply artificial intelligence to cancer treatments for veterans. The VA and IBM Watson Health first partnered to help cancer patients in 2016, as part of then-Vice President Joe Biden's cancer moonshot initiative. The partnership uses the Watson cognitive computing platform to help the VA's precision oncology department deliver individualized treatment plans. So far, the VA has used IBM Watson to help more than 2,700 veterans with cancer. To prepare an individualized treatment plan, teams of scientists and clinicians must sequence a patient's DNA to pinpoint the likely cancer-causing mutations and determine what treatments would target those specific mutations.


Two Huge Problems AI Could Solve Today

#artificialintelligence

Artificial intelligence and Big Data get lots of ink (and electrons) these days about their awesome promise for the future. But here are two things of real and immediate importance that AI could do today to improve people's lives and strengthen our economy. Big Data is a Big Deal because we are being already overwhelmed with information, and it's going to get a lot more overwhelming very, very soon. The research firm IDC estimates that within two years we will have be awash in an astonishing 40 zettabytes of data (a zettabyte is one sextillion bytes), or 50 times the data that existed just in 2010. This will be the equivalent of 5,200 gigabytes of data for every man, woman, and child on the planet.


Two Huge Problems AI Could Solve Today

#artificialintelligence

Artificial intelligence and Big Data get lots of ink (and electrons) these days about their awesome promise for the future. But here are two things of real and immediate importance that AI could do today to improve people's lives and strengthen our economy. Big Data is a Big Deal because we are being already overwhelmed with information, and it's going to get a lot more overwhelming very, very soon. The research firm IDC estimates that within two years we will have be awash in an astonishing 40 zettabytes of data (a zettabyte is one sextillion bytes), or 50 times the data that existed just in 2010. This will be the equivalent of 5,200 gigabytes of data for every man, woman, and child on the planet.


Two Huge Problems AI Could Solve Today

Forbes Technology

Artificial intelligence and Big Data get lots of ink (and electrons) these days about their awesome promise for the future. But here are two things of real and immediate importance that AI could do today to improve people's lives and strengthen our economy. Big Data is a Big Deal because we are being already overwhelmed with information, and it's going to get a lot more overwhelming very, very soon. The research firm IDC estimates that within two years we will have be awash in an astonishing 40 zettabytes of data (a zettabyte is one sextillion bytes), or 50 times the data that existed just in 2010. This will be the equivalent of 5,200 gigabytes of data for every man, woman, and child on the planet.


Using Artificial Intelligence to Match Veterans to Jobs

#artificialintelligence

SkillMil, a new business venture spun off from the independent, nonprofit research center SRI International, aims to pair military veterans with civilian job opportunities. SkillMil uses a platform that quantifies the percentage match of a veteran's skills and experience with current job postings. The platform also identifies the training and skills needed to achieve a 100 percent job match. "Using state-of-the-art semantic reasoning technology, SkillMil improves the civilian employment experience for veterans by precisely matching the skills and experience of military veterans with job opportunities at companies seeking to hire veterans," the Menlo Park, California-based SRI announced in a release. To leverage a veteran's background, the platform also helps translate military jargon, revamping the process of understanding a soldier's skills and qualifications into a less confounding experience for civilian hiring managers.


Precision Medicine as an Accelerator for Next Generation Cognitive Supercomputing

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

In the past several years, we have taken advantage of a number of opportunities to advance the intersection of next generation high-performance computing AI and big data technologies through partnerships in precision medicine. Today we are in the throes of piecing together what is likely the most unique convergence of medical data and computer technologies. But more deeply, we observe that the traditional paradigm of computer simulation and prediction needs fundamental revision. This is the time for a number of reasons. We will review what the drivers are, why now, how this has been approached over the past several years, and where we are heading.


Special program targets vets for AI, drone jobs

#artificialintelligence

Jennifer Malandra has eight years' active service in the Navy and a Naval Academy education. Both are in search of civilian jobs in the highly competitive tech industry. They and 23 others are wrapping up a 10-day program run by BreakLine, an educational program sponsored by a who's who of Silicon Valley companies in search of bright candidates. The focus today was artificial intelligence and drones. Both specialties are creating jobs as a result of automation and robotics.


Special program targets vets for AI, drone jobs

#artificialintelligence

Jennifer Malandra has eight years' active service in the Navy and a Naval Academy education. Both are in search of civilian jobs in the highly competitive tech industry. They and 23 others are wrapping up a 10-day program run by BreakLine, an educational program sponsored by a who's who of Silicon Valley companies in search of bright candidates. Both specialties are creating jobs as a result of automation and robotics. The group was visiting Kespry, a Menlo Park drone company that has hired six veterans from the BreakLine program with service in the Army, Marines and Navy.


Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning for Healthcare - Sigmoidal

#artificialintelligence

Artificial Intelligence (AI), machine learning, and deep learning are taking the healthcare industry by storm. They are not pie in the sky technologies any longer; they are practical tools that can help companies optimize their service provision, improve the standard of care, generate more revenue, and decrease risk. Nearly all major companies in the healthcare space have already begun to use the technology in practice; here I present some of the important highlights of the implementation, and what they mean for other companies in healthcare.


Can AI be used to improve patient care?

#artificialintelligence

Google's artificial intelligence (AI) division DeepMind is developing a system that could one day predict when a hospital patient is at risk of dying, even if serious signs of illness are not immediately apparent. With the assistance of the US Veterans Administration, the partnership is seeking to understand the changes in a hospital patient's condition that could result in death if left unchecked by a doctor or nurse, Alphr reports. To do this, the website says, the partnership has fed 700,000 medical records to an AI programme to identify signs of "human error" in treatment. The records are from US army and police veterans. The partnership's first priority is to use AI to understand acute kidney injury, says MedCityNews, which is "a complication related to patient deterioration".