veteran


Google's new job-hunting tools help veterans search for more fitting civilian work

USATODAY

Google Assistant wants to make the world a little bit brighter with its newest feature. Tony Spitz has the details. Google has some new job search tools for military veterans that make it easier for them to find civilian jobs fitting the skills they had in the military. Google has some new job search tools, especially for military veterans and their families who are looking for work. The new features, available now, let military service members and their families search "Jobs for Veterans" and then enter specific military job codes (MOS, AFSC, NEC, etc.) to find civilian jobs with skills similar to those they used in the military.


Artificial Intelligence May Help Match Veterans with Civilian Jobs

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One of the problems military veterans have long faced is matching their skills learned in the armed forces to the needs of civilian employers, an issue Congress continues to grapple with in the fiscal 2019 spending bills. Many military jobs translate perfectly into the civilian sector -- repairing an Abrams tank is much like repairing any heavy piece of machinery, for example -- but many combat and leadership skills do not, on the surface, directly transfer. The Department of Veterans Affairs' Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment Program is at the forefront of helping veterans find the right job after military service. The program's counselors help assess capabilities of veterans and help men and women veterans find the right job. But the VR&E program, as it is known, is often short of counselors and funding.


Meet the Chatbots Providing Mental Health Care

WSJ.com: WSJD - Technology

"Half an hour on a good night," I write back. "What do you do to calm down or relax?" "I watch crappy tv or read." "If you need more ideas, try reading a relaxing novel, meditating, or taking a soothing bath," Sara replies. Her responses are encouraging and empathetic--if occasionally robotic. That's because Sara is not a person.


How the VA is Using AI to Target Cancer

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When Tam Mai Huynh found out in 2016 that the source of his nagging cough was lung cancer, it came as a shock. A recently retired Army Special Forces veteran and married father of two young children, Huynh never had smoked. Nor did he have a family history of cancer. Nevertheless, the disease had spread to Huynh's spine, lymph nodes, and brain. He began chemotherapy, driving two hours every two to three weeks from his home to the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) hospital in Durham, North Carolina.


Why Do Some Companies Have Humans Pretending to be Bots?

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Artificial intelligence has become such a catchy selling point for online services that some companies have turned to a bit of sleight of hand -- and voice -- to convince people they have smart machines working for them. Several companies have employed humans to impersonate chatbots performing scheduling and other services. A prototype for Facebook's AI assistant for Messenger, called M, had people behind the curtain calling M's shots for two and a half years before taking humans out of the equation in January. Amazon's Mechanical Turk reportedly used people to transcribe some expense and benefits documents Amazon's touted SmartScan software was supposed to be doing but couldn't handle. To anyone who has dreaded the labyrinthine house of mirrors automated call systems have become, it might seem odd companies want to pretend to have a machine on the other end of the line rather than a human, but there are several factors at play.



VA reenlists IBM's Watson in fight against cancer

FOX News

File photo - Attendees gather at an IBM Watson event in lower Manhattan, New York Jan. 9, 2014. Two years ago, oncologists with the US Department of Veterans Affairs started using IBM Watson artificial intelligence to identify targeted treatment options for cancer patients. Now, they will be able to continue that work for at least another year. The VA and IBM Watson Health today announced an extension of their partnership through at least June 2019. Working out of a precision oncology "hub" in Durham, N.C., a small group of VA oncologists and pathologists receive tumor samples from patients around the country.


IBM Watson Health extends partnership with US to help vets with cancer

ZDNet

IBM on Thursday said it's extending its partnership with the US Department of Veterans Affairs to apply artificial intelligence to cancer treatments for veterans. The VA and IBM Watson Health first partnered to help cancer patients in 2016, as part of then-Vice President Joe Biden's cancer moonshot initiative. The partnership uses the Watson cognitive computing platform to help the VA's precision oncology department deliver individualized treatment plans. So far, the VA has used IBM Watson to help more than 2,700 veterans with cancer. To prepare an individualized treatment plan, teams of scientists and clinicians must sequence a patient's DNA to pinpoint the likely cancer-causing mutations and determine what treatments would target those specific mutations.


Two Huge Problems AI Could Solve Today

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Artificial intelligence and Big Data get lots of ink (and electrons) these days about their awesome promise for the future. But here are two things of real and immediate importance that AI could do today to improve people's lives and strengthen our economy. Big Data is a Big Deal because we are being already overwhelmed with information, and it's going to get a lot more overwhelming very, very soon. The research firm IDC estimates that within two years we will have be awash in an astonishing 40 zettabytes of data (a zettabyte is one sextillion bytes), or 50 times the data that existed just in 2010. This will be the equivalent of 5,200 gigabytes of data for every man, woman, and child on the planet.


Two Huge Problems AI Could Solve Today

#artificialintelligence

Artificial intelligence and Big Data get lots of ink (and electrons) these days about their awesome promise for the future. But here are two things of real and immediate importance that AI could do today to improve people's lives and strengthen our economy. Big Data is a Big Deal because we are being already overwhelmed with information, and it's going to get a lot more overwhelming very, very soon. The research firm IDC estimates that within two years we will have be awash in an astonishing 40 zettabytes of data (a zettabyte is one sextillion bytes), or 50 times the data that existed just in 2010. This will be the equivalent of 5,200 gigabytes of data for every man, woman, and child on the planet.