Goto

Collaborating Authors

qubit


Quantifying Quantum computing's value in financial services - Fintech News

#artificialintelligence

The next great leap for computing may be a bit closer with the help of joint efforts between the U.S. government, the private sector -- and hundreds of millions of dollars. And along the way, we might see a benefit for the financial services sector in the form of reduced false positives in fraud detection. The U.S. Department of Energy said this week that it will spend $625 million over the next five years to develop a dozen research centers devoted to artificial intelligence (AI) and quantum computing. Another $340 million will come from the private sector and academia, bringing Uncle Sam together with the likes of IBM, Amazon and Google to apply the highest of high tech to a variety of verticals and applications. In an interview with Karen Webster, Dr. Stefan Wörner, global leader for quantum finance and optimization at IBM, said we're getting closer to crossing the quantum-computing Rubicon from concept to real-world applications. The basic premise behind quantum computing is that it can tackle tasks with blinding speed and pinpoint accuracy that aren't possible with "regular" computers.


Quantifying Quantum Computing's Value

#artificialintelligence

The next great leap for computing may be a bit closer with the help of joint efforts between the U.S. government, the private sector -- and hundreds of millions of dollars. And along the way, we might see a benefit for the financial services sector in the form of reduced false positives in fraud detection. The U.S. Department of Energy said this week that it will spend $625 million over the next five years to develop a dozen research centers devoted to artificial intelligence (AI) and quantum computing. Another $340 million will come from the private sector and academia, bringing Uncle Sam together with the likes of IBM, Amazon and Google to apply the highest of high tech to a variety of verticals and applications. In an interview with Karen Webster, Dr. Stefan Wörner, global leader for quantum finance and optimization at IBM, said we're getting closer to crossing the quantum-computing Rubicon from concept to real-world applications.


The coldest computers in the world

BBC News

Imagine the US is under attack. An enemy aircraft, loaded with warheads, is heading towards the coast, dipping in and out of radar. Fighter jets have been scrambled and there's a frantic effort to pinpoint the target. But the nation's best defence is not an aircraft carrier or a missile system. "Use the quantum computer," yells a general.


The future of computing, a perspective

#artificialintelligence

Could it be possible to offer Einstein's intelligence, the context of Gandhi and the memory of all humanity in a consolidated computer platform? Will we be able, in the near future, to improve man - machine collaboration and connect both? So we are better able that to make more intelligent decisions? All of us have been generating enormous mountains of data for some years, thanks to 6 billion smartphones and around 30 billion connected sensors. To give you an idea; together we are producing 44 Zettabytes of data this year. One Zettabyte is comparable to 700,000 times the largest library in the world times 44.


Zapata CEO Christopher Savoie: The QC and ML business use case is 'a when, not an if'

#artificialintelligence

The story of quantum computing hardware companies is well known. But as tech giants Amazon and Microsoft push the quantum computing conversation to the cloud, we're also seeing quantum computing software companies emerge. One such company, Zapata, is building an enterprise software platform for quantum computing. Businesses with deep pockets are increasingly exploring quantum computing, which depends on qubits to perform computations that would be much more difficult, or simply not feasible, on classical computers. Quantum advantage, the inflection point when quantum computers begin to solve useful problems, is a long way off (if it can even be achieved) but its potential is massive.


Q-CTRL and Advanced Navigation partner for quantum-based navigation systems

ZDNet

Quantum startup Q-CTRL has partnered with AI-based navigation hardware firm Advanced Navigation to further work on quantum-enabled sensing. The two Australian companies have announced their intentions to conduct joint technical development in support of both the civilian and defence markets, focusing on quantum-enhanced precision navigation and timing (PNT). According to the companies, quantum sensing is considered one of the most promising areas in the global research effort to leverage the exotic properties of quantum physics for real-world benefit. "It is expected to revolutionise PNT through an ability to detect very weak accelerations while maintaining accuracy over long times," they wrote. "Quantum-enabled PNT can therefore enable highly precise navigation in commercial and military applications where GPS is unavailable."


Honeywell claims it has built the most powerful quantum computer ever

New Scientist

Honeywell, a company best known for making control systems for homes, businesses and planes, claims to have built the most powerful quantum computer ever. Other researchers are sceptical about its power, but for the company it is a step toward integrating quantum computing into its everyday operations. Honeywell measured its computer's capabilities using a metric invented by IBM called quantum volume. It takes into account the number of quantum bits – or qubits – the computer has, their error rate, how long the system can spend calculating before the qubits stop working and a few other key properties. Measuring quantum volume involves running about 220 different algorithms on the computer, says Tony Uttley, the president of Honeywell Quantum Solutions.



Quantum machine learning concepts TensorFlow Quantum

#artificialintelligence

Google's quantum supremacy experiment used 53 noisy qubits to demonstrate it could perform a calculation in 200 seconds on a quantum computer that would take 10,000 years on the largest classical computer using existing algorithms. This marks the beginning of the Noisy Intermediate-Scale Quantum (NISQ) computing era. In the coming years, quantum devices with tens-to-hundreds of noisy qubits are expected to become a reality. Quantum computing relies on properties of quantum mechanics to compute problems that would be out of reach for classical computers. A quantum computer uses qubits.


To Tune Up Your Quantum Computer, Better Call an AI Mechanic

#artificialintelligence

A high-end race car engine needs all its components tuned and working together precisely to deliver top-quality performance. The same can be said about the processor inside a quantum computer, whose delicate bits must be adjusted in just the right way before it can perform a calculation. According to a team that includes scientists at JQI and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), it's an artificial intelligence, that's who. The team's paper in the journal Physical Review Applied outlines a way to teach an AI to make an interconnected set of adjustments to tiny quantum dots, which are among the many promising devices for creating the quantum bits, or "qubits," that would form the switches in a quantum computer's processor. Precisely tweaking the dots is crucial for transforming them into properly functioning qubits, and until now the job had to be done painstakingly by human operators, requiring hours of work to create even a small handful of qubits for a single calculation.