obligation


What can ai and big data do for you (read your clients)?

#artificialintelligence

Recently, I read yet another article in Harvard Business Review about the potential for Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Big Data (BD) to revolutionize an industry, in this case that of education. After all, using computers in the classroom to aid in the acquisition of knowledge and skill has been a thing for some time now. So what this articles offered is a prediction of next-level impact. Again, a theme with which I've become quite familiar in the pages of this journal in recent years. That as I read, it hit me: virtually everything that the author, renowned AI expert Lasse Rouhiainen, suggested could be equally applied to the financial advisory/planning profession.


Robot Law

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A few months ago, in January 2018, the European Parliament's Legal Affairs Committee approved a report that outlines a possible legal framework to regulate the interactions between a) humans, and b) robots and Artificial Intelligence systems. The report is quite revolutionary. It proposes, e.g., giving certain types of robots and AI systems personhood, as "electronic persons": These electronic persons would have rights and obligations, and the report suggests that they should obey Isaac Asimov's Laws of Robotics. The report also advises that the manufacturers of robots and AI systems should build in a'kill switch' to be able to deactivate them. Another recommendation is that a European Agency for Robotics and AI be established that would be capable of responding to new opportunities and challenges arising from technological advancements in robotics.


Robot Law

#artificialintelligence

A few months ago, in January 2018, the European Parliament's Legal Affairs Committee approved a report that outlines a possible legal framework to regulate the interactions between a) humans, and b) robots and Artificial Intelligence systems. The report is quite revolutionary. It proposes, e.g., giving certain types of robots and AI systems personhood, as "electronic persons": These electronic persons would have rights and obligations, and the report suggests that they should obey Isaac Asimov's Laws of Robotics. The report also advises that the manufacturers of robots and AI systems should build in a'kill switch' to be able to deactivate them. Another recommendation is that a European Agency for Robotics and AI be established that would be capable of responding to new opportunities and challenges arising from technological advancements in robotics.


The Windfall Clause: Distributing the Benefits of AI for the Common Good

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

As the transformative potential of AI has become increasingly salient as a matter of public and political interest, there has been growing discussion about the need to ensure that AI broadly benefits humanity. This in turn has spurred debate on the social responsibilities of large technology companies to serve the interests of society at large. In response, ethical principles and codes of conduct have been proposed to meet the escalating demand for this responsibility to be taken seriously. As yet, however, few institutional innovations have been suggested to translate this responsibility into legal commitments which apply to companies positioned to reap large financial gains from the development and use of AI. This paper offers one potentially attractive tool for addressing such issues: the Windfall Clause, which is an ex ante commitment by AI firms to donate a significant amount of any eventual extremely large profits. By this we mean an early commitment that profits that a firm could not earn without achieving fundamental, economically transformative breakthroughs in AI capabilities will be donated to benefit humanity broadly, with particular attention towards mitigating any downsides from deployment of windfall-generating AI.


Towards a computer-interpretable actionable formal model to encode data governance rules

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Towards a computer-interpretable actionable formal model to encode data governance rules Rui Zhao School of Informatics University of Edinburgh Edinburgh, UK s1623641@sms.ed.ac.uk Malcolm Atkinson School of Informatics University of Edinburgh Edinburgh, UK Malcolm.Atkinson@ed.ac.uk Abstract --With the needs of science and business, data sharing and reuse has become an intensive activity for various areas. In many cases, governance imposes rules concerning data use, but there is no existing computational technique to help data-users comply with such rules. We argue that intelligent systems can be used to improve the situation, by recording provenance records during processing, encoding the rules and performing reasoning. We present our initial work, designing formal models for data rules and flow rules and the reasoning system, as the first step towards helping data providers and data users sustain productive relationships. I NTRODUCTION Data ethics and privacy are of rising importance, especially with the establishment of GDPR [1]. Similar issues also apply in research when data from various sources are used as inputs to analyses and simulations. Researchers are aware that there are governance rules applied to the data, but they can easily lose track of the rules when the number of sources becomes large. The large volume of rules brings problem from three aspects: 1) to fully read and understand the rules; 2) to consider the consequence of combining data and their associate rules; 3) to assign rules to output so that results can be used compliantly. One response is to make data open and freely accessible (e.g. This sounds nice but it still leaves rules, for example to properly acknowledge sources and to protect personal and commercially sensitive data, even within collaborating communities [4]. Moreover, this doesn't solve (or even decrease) the prevalent polarization: data are either completely public (with one or a few well-known commonly agreed governance rules) or completely under control with heterogeneous (yet potentially similar) governance rules written in different languages, similar to the situation for copyright licenses.


The Ethics of Growth and Investment in the Age of AI Deloitte Middle East Integrity, ethics & quality

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In this new century, the core opportunity - and challenge - facing corporate managers, as well as those investing in their activities, is not just to harness new technology to develop and deliver attractive products and services in ways that generate a healthy profit. It is also to do so in ways that contribute to meaningful progress against the ethical obligations imposed by UN's Sustainable Development Goals. Daunting as it is, this obligation is made more difficult still -- in both practical and ethical terms -- by the very nature of the digital/AI technology on which such progress depends. For the first time in human history, that technology makes it possible to take human beings out of critical decision loops entirely. The ethical questions thus raised far outrun the settled wisdom embodied in yesterday's laws, regulations, and cultural practices.


AI: Ethics and Algorithms

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In October a German group published its position on ethics and AI. With the new European Commission tipped to put forward a comprehensive AI policy in the first 100 days of office, a lot of scrutiny has been given to the proposals. German consumer rights organisation, vzbv, CEO, Klaus Müller explained: "We expect this report – which was drafted by experts for the German Ministries of the interior and justice/consumers – to influence the plans of the European Commission. At the presentation of the report people already said that its findings should now become part of the EU-level debate." There are several reasons to take the report seriously.


AI for Governance and Governance of AI

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Artificial Intelligence is a hot topic and many organizations are now starting to exploit these technologies, at the same time there are many concerns around the impact this will have on society. Governance sets the framework within which organizations conduct their business in a way that manages risk and compliance as well as to ensure an ethical approach. AI has the potential to improve governance and reduce costs, but it also creates challenges that need to be governed. The concept of AI is not new, but cloud computing has provided the access to data and the computing power needed to turn it into a practical reality. However, while there are some legitimate concerns, the current state of AI is still a long way from the science fiction portrayal of a threat to humanity.


Five sure steps to achieve AI success--and sidestep the pitfalls

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We all know that artificial intelligence and machine learning will magically solve all your business problems, while Alexa makes you a dry martini and takes out the garbage, right? Wait a minute--lofty promises and fanciful fantasies around AI haven't been realized broadly in the banking industry, or many others for that matter. AI is encountering challenges in healthcare and even at Google, AI can raise controversy. So let's take a closer look: Why do AI and machine learning (ML) projects fail, and what should you do to steer clear of the pitfalls? The biggest problem blocking AI and ML projects centers on underlying data, says Bassam Chaptini, chief technology officer at Unqork, an enterprise software company that caters to the financial services and insurance industries.


Who owns AI's ideas? Disputing intellectual property rights

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In 2016 The Washington Post unleashed a new reporter on the world, an artificial intelligence (AI) system called Heliograf. In its first year, it churned out 300 short reports on the Rio Olympics, followed by 500 brief articles about the presidential election, which clocked up pretty good engagement online. Meanwhile, pharmaceutical companies are increasingly turning to AI to drastically speed up the process of discovering new drugs, analysing huge quantities of data to come up with new molecules that could potentially have a therapeutic effect. It's moves like these that have led some to suggest that, one day at least, AIs might be deemed owners of copyright or other intellectual property (IP). However, according to most legal and technology experts, this scenario is a long way off.