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Artificial intelligence: MEPs want the EU to be a global standard-setter

#artificialintelligence

On Tuesday, the European Parliament adopted the final recommendations of its Special Committee on Artificial Intelligence in a Digital Age (AIDA). The text, adopted with 495 votes to 34, and 102 abstentions, says that the public debate on the use of artificial intelligence (AI) should focus on the technology's enormous potential to complement human labour. It notes that the EU has fallen behind in the global race for tech leadership. There is a risk that standards will be developed elsewhere, often by non-democratic actors, while MEPs believe the EU needs to act as a global standard-setter in AI. The EU should not always regulate AI as a technology, say MEPs, and the level of regulatory intervention should be proportionate to the type of risk associated with the particular use of an AI system. The report will feed into upcoming parliamentary work on AI, in particular the AI Act, which is currently being discussed in the Internal Market and Consumer Protection (IMCO) and the Civil Liberties, Justice and Home Affairs (LIBE) committees.


Artificial intelligence: MEPs want the EU to be a global standard-setter

#artificialintelligence

On Tuesday, the European Parliament adopted the final recommendations of its Special Committee on Artificial Intelligence in a Digital Age (AIDA).


Artificial intelligence: the EU needs to act as a global standard-setter

#artificialintelligence

The adopted text says that the public debate on the use of artificial intelligence (AI) should focus on this technology's enormous potential to complement humans. The text warns that the EU has fallen behind in the global race for tech leadership. As a result, there is a risk that standards will be developed elsewhere in the future, often by non-democratic actors, while the EU needs to act as a global standard-setter in AI. MEPs identified policy options that could unlock AI's potential in health, the environment and climate change, to help combat pandemics and global hunger, as well as enhancing people's quality of life through personalised medicine. AI, if combined with the necessary support infrastructure, education and training, can increase capital and labour productivity, innovation, sustainable growth and job creation, they add.


Artificial intelligence and privacy: A balancing exercise

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The recent development of new technologies relying on artificial intelligence ("AI") across the world has shown the innovation, opportunities and potential value to society AI can undeniably bring. Partly due to the Covid crisis which encouraged the early adoption of automated processes, there has been a significant uptake of AI in recent times among businesses. AI is changing how companies operate across almost every sector, and notably fintech, healthcare, human resources, insurance, the internet of things, to name a few. Focussing on Ireland, an interesting study has shown that nearly two thirds of businesses are likely to use AI (or machine learning, one of AI's major subfields) by 2023. Many businesses see AI as being capable of bringing a competitive edge to the table by speeding up processes and driving cost savings.


Locally Invariant Explanations: Towards Stable and Unidirectional Explanations through Local Invariant Learning

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Locally interpretable model agnostic explanations (LIME) method is one of the most popular methods used to explain black-box models at a per example level. Although many variants have been proposed, few provide a simple way to produce high fidelity explanations that are also stable and intuitive. In this work, we provide a novel perspective by proposing a model agnostic local explanation method inspired by the invariant risk minimization (IRM) principle -- originally proposed for (global) out-of-distribution generalization -- to provide such high fidelity explanations that are also stable and unidirectional across nearby examples. Our method is based on a game theoretic formulation where we theoretically show that our approach has a strong tendency to eliminate features where the gradient of the black-box function abruptly changes sign in the locality of the example we want to explain, while in other cases it is more careful and will choose a more conservative (feature) attribution, a behavior which can be highly desirable for recourse. Empirically, we show on tabular, image and text data that the quality of our explanations with neighborhoods formed using random perturbations are much better than LIME and in some cases even comparable to other methods that use realistic neighbors sampled from the data manifold. This is desirable given that learning a manifold to either create realistic neighbors or to project explanations is typically expensive or may even be impossible. Moreover, our algorithm is simple and efficient to train, and can ascertain stable input features for local decisions of a black-box without access to side information such as a (partial) causal graph as has been seen in some recent works.


AI rules: what the European Parliament wants

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Parliament is working on the Commission proposal, presented on 21 April 2021, for turning Europe into the global hub for trustworthy AI. Ahead of the Commission's proposal on AI, the Parliament set up a special committee to analyse the impact of artificial intelligence on the EU economy. "Europe needs to develop AI that is trustworthy, eliminates biases and discrimination, and serves the common good, while ensuring business and industry thrive and generate economic prosperity," said the new committee chair Dragoș Tudorache. On 20 October 2020, Parliament adopted three reports outlining how the EU can best regulate AI while boosting innovation, ethical standards and trust in technology. One of the reports focuses on how to ensure safety, transparency and accountability, prevent bias and discrimination, foster social and environmental responsibility, and ensure respect for fundamental rights.


European Parliament calls for a ban on facial recognition in public spaces

Engadget

The European Parliament has called on lawmakers in the European Union to ban automated facial recognition in public spaces and to enforce strict safeguards for police use of artificial intelligence. MEPs voted in favor of the non-binding resolution by 377-248, with 62 abstentions. The MEPs said citizens should only be monitored when they're suspected of a crime. They cited concerns over algorithmic bias in AI and argued that both human supervision and legal protections are required to avoid discrimination. The politicians noted there's evidence suggesting AI-based identification systems misidentify minority ethnic groups, LGBTI people, seniors and women at higher rates.


European Parliament calls for ban on AI-powered mass surveillance

#artificialintelligence

The EU Parliament has voted in favor of a resolution that essentially calls for the ban of AI-powered biometric mass surveillance technologies such as facial recognition systems in the continent. The MEPs (members of the European parliament) are worried about discrimination, bias, and injustice that arise from AI-based predictive policing, and their concerns are based on numerous real examples. For history, 377 MEPs voted in favor, 248 against, and 62 were absent. Vendors of AI-based facial recognition solutions have admitted that algorithm bias has plagued their systems for years and have made efforts to solve the problem through diverse data sets and machine learning optimizations. However, the discriminatory rates are still too high to be acceptable in any important deployment context.


Ban biometric surveillance, says European Parliament – TechCrunch

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The European Parliament has voted to back a total ban on biometric mass surveillance. AI-powered remote surveillance technologies such as facial recognition have huge implications for fundamental rights and freedoms like privacy but are already creeping into use in public in Europe. To respect "privacy and human dignity", MEPs said that EU lawmakers should pass a permanent ban on the automated recognition of individuals in public spaces, saying citizens should only be monitored when suspected of a crime. The parliament has also called for a ban on the use of private facial recognition databases -- such as the controversial AI system created by US startup Clearview (also already in use by some police forces in Europe) -- and said predictive policing based on behavioural data should also be outlawed. MEPs also want to ban social scoring systems which seek to rate the trustworthiness of citizens based on their behaviour or personality.


What are the contours of the EU legislation envisaged by MEPs around artificial intelligence? - Actu IA

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MEPs are currently working on legislation to be adopted around artificial intelligence (AI). Innovation, access to data, protection of citizens, ethics, research, legal, social and economic issues, the impacts of the future regulation are numerous and central for citizens, administrations and businesses alike. So what are the outlines of the EU legislation envisaged by MEPs on artificial intelligence? This is the question Parliament has answered. Intelligence plays a major role in the digital transformation of our societies.