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Winning The AI-Enabled War-at-Sea

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DARPA's Ocean of Things (OoT) program aims to achieve maritime situational awareness over large ocean areas through deploying thousands of small, low-cost floats that form a distributed sensor network. Each smart float will have a suite of commercially available sensors to collect environmental and activity data; the later function involves automatically detecting, tracking and identifying nearby ships and – potentially – close aircraft traffic. The floats use edge processing with detection algorithms and then transmit the semi-processed data periodically via the Iridium satellite constellation to a cloud network for on-shore storage. AI machine learning then combs through this sparse data in real time to uncover hidden insights. The floats are environmentally friendly, have a life of around a year and in buys of 50,000 have a unit cost of about US$500 each.


DARPA says industry interest in AI Next campaign is 'very good, solid' - FedScoop

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Despite a summer of controversy surrounding the use of artificial intelligence for military purposes, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency says it has no problem garnering interest in its AI research projects. "We don't see that we are having problems engaging with industry," Valerie Browning, director of the Defense Science office at DARPA, said on a Washington Post event panel last week. DARPA recently announced a $2 billion campaign called "AI Next" aimed at "third wave" AI research. The goal is to get the technology to a place where machines adapt to changing situations the way human intelligence does. Responding to a question about whether and how Google's decision to end its work with Pentagon AI initiative Project Maven has impacted DARPA, Browning downplayed any effect.


AI-Controlled F-16s Are Now Working As A Team - Pioneering Minds

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The goal of bringing artificial intelligence into the air-to-air dogfighting arena has moved a step closer with a series of simulated tests that pitted AI-controlled F-16 fighter jets working as a team against an opponent. The experiments were part of Phase 1 of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency’s (DARPA) Air Combat Evolution (ACE) program, focused on exploring how AI and machine learning may help automate various aspects of air-to-air combat. DARPA announced recently that it’s halfway through Phase 1 of ACE and that simulated AI dogfights under the so-called Scrimmage 1 took place at Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) last month. Using a simulation environment designed by APL, Scrimmage 1 involved a demonstration of 2-v-1 simulated engagements with two blue force (friendly) F-16s working collaboratively to defeat an undisclosed enemy red air (enemy) aircraft.


Intel joins DARPA in search of encryption 'holy grail'

ZDNet

Intel has signed an agreement with Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) to take part in its Data Protection in Virtual Environments (DPRIVE) program, which is aiming to develop an accelerator for fully homomorphic encryption (FHE). "Fully homomorphic encryption remains the holy grail in the quest to keep data secure while in use," Intel Labs principal engineer Rosario Cammarota said. FHE is an approach to data security that delivers mathematical proof of encryption by using cryptographic means, which DARPA has touted could potentially provide a new level of certainty around how data is stored and manipulated. "Today, traditional encryption protects data while stored or in transmission, but the information must be decrypted to perform a computation, analyse it, or employ it to train a machine learning model," the agency explained. "Decryption endangers the data, exposing it to compromise by savvy adversaries or even accidental leaks. FHE enables computation on encrypted information, allowing users to strike a balance between using sensitive data to its full extent and removing the risk of exposure."


General Atomics Aeronautical Systems Tests AI-Driven Avenger Drones

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General Atomics Aeronautical Systems (GA-ASI) has announced that on October 28, the firm tested one of its artificial intelligence (AI) driven Avenger drones. The release did not indicate where the test took place but it did emphasize that the drones were built in cooperation with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). GA-ASI further noted that it used a government-supplied Collaborative Operations in Denied Environment (CODE) autonomy engine, which was installed on the Avenger drone, in order to support air-to-air targeting missions. CODE was developed by DARPA to deal with the scalability and cost-effectiveness issues concerning unmanned aircraft systems operations. "DARPA's CODE program aims to overcome these limitations with new algorithms and software for existing unmanned aircraft that would extend mission capabilities and improve U.S. forces' ability to conduct operations in denied or contested airspace," read the project's webpage.


What is Artificial Intelligence? It's Applications and Importance

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The term artificial intelligence was initially revealed in 1956, yet AI has become more mainstream today on account of expanded data volumes, progressed algorithms, and enhancements in computing power and storage. During the 1960s, the US Department of Defense checked out this kind of work and started training computers to emulate fundamental human reasoning. For instance, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) finished road planning projects during the 1970s. What's more, DARPA created intelligent personal assistants in 2003, some time before Siri, Alexa or Cortana were easily recognized names. Artificial intelligence (AI), is the capacity of a digital computer or computer-controlled robot to perform activities usually connected with smart creatures.


What is Artificial Intelligence? It's Applications and Importance

#artificialintelligence

BEGIN ARTICLE PREVIEW: The term artificial intelligence was initially revealed in 1956, yet AI has become more mainstream today on account of expanded data volumes, progressed algorithms, and enhancements in computing power and storage. Early AI research during the 1950s explored themes like problem solving and symbolic methods. During the 1960s, the US Department of Defense checked out this kind of work and started training computers to emulate fundamental human reasoning. For instance, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) finished road planning projects during the 1970s. What’s more, DARPA created intelligent personal assistants in 2003, some time before Siri, Alexa or Cortana were easily recognized names. What is Artificial


Fighter aircraft will soon get AI pilots

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CLASSIC DOGFIGHTS, in which two pilots match wits and machines to shoot down their opponent with well-aimed gunfire, are a thing of the past. Guided missiles have seen to that, and the last recorded instance of such duelling was 32 years ago, near the end of the Iran-Iraq war, when an Iranian F-4 Phantom took out an Iraqi Su-22 with its 20mm cannon. But memory lingers, and dogfighting, even of the simulated sort in which the laws of physics are substituted by equations running inside a computer, is reckoned a good test of the aptitude of a pilot in training. And that is also true when the pilot in question is, itself, a computer program. So, when America's Defence Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), an adventurous arm of the Pentagon, considered the future of air-to-air combat and the role of artificial intelligence (AI) within that future, it began with basics that Manfred von Richthofen himself might have approved of.


Four US companies will develop artificial intelligence for the military

#artificialintelligence

WASHINGTON, (BM) – The four US companies Boeing, EpiSci, Heron Systems, physicsAI and the Georgia Institute of Technology were selected by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) to develop artificial intelligence for the US military, learned BulgarianMilitary.com. According to information from the site Popular Mechanics, the contract has already been signed and the selected companies and technical institute will have to develop a system of artificial intelligence that will allow in the near future to support American aviation by conducting independent air combat and close combat. The idea of artificial intelligence in military affairs is not recent, but is embedded as a concept in the most militarily developed countries. We are witnessing the United States, Russia and China working hard in this area, and many other countries have military weapons systems that are at the penultimate stage to artificial intelligence – autonomous weapons systems. According to the set characteristics of DARPA, the future artificial intelligence system must be self-taught and draw logical conclusions from its mistakes.


Fighter aircraft will soon get AI pilots

#artificialintelligence

CLASSIC DOGFIGHTS, in which two pilots match wits and machines to shoot down their opponent with well-aimed gunfire, are a thing of the past. Guided missiles have seen to that, and the last recorded instance of such combat was 32 years ago, near the end of the Iran-Iraq war, when an Iranian F-4 Phantom took out an Iraqi Su-22 with its 20mm cannon. But memory lingers, and dogfighting, even of the simulated sort in which the laws of physics are substituted by equations running inside a computer, is reckoned a good test of the aptitude of a pilot in training. And that is also true when the pilot in question is, itself, a computer program. So, when America's Defence Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), an adventurous arm of the Pentagon, considered the future of air-to-air combat and the role of artificial intelligence (AI) within that future, it began with basics that Manfred von Richthofen himself might have approved of.