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What is Artificial Intelligence? It's Applications and Importance

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The term artificial intelligence was initially revealed in 1956, yet AI has become more mainstream today on account of expanded data volumes, progressed algorithms, and enhancements in computing power and storage. During the 1960s, the US Department of Defense checked out this kind of work and started training computers to emulate fundamental human reasoning. For instance, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) finished road planning projects during the 1970s. What's more, DARPA created intelligent personal assistants in 2003, some time before Siri, Alexa or Cortana were easily recognized names. Artificial intelligence (AI), is the capacity of a digital computer or computer-controlled robot to perform activities usually connected with smart creatures.


What is Artificial Intelligence? It's Applications and Importance

#artificialintelligence

BEGIN ARTICLE PREVIEW: The term artificial intelligence was initially revealed in 1956, yet AI has become more mainstream today on account of expanded data volumes, progressed algorithms, and enhancements in computing power and storage. Early AI research during the 1950s explored themes like problem solving and symbolic methods. During the 1960s, the US Department of Defense checked out this kind of work and started training computers to emulate fundamental human reasoning. For instance, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) finished road planning projects during the 1970s. What’s more, DARPA created intelligent personal assistants in 2003, some time before Siri, Alexa or Cortana were easily recognized names. What is Artificial


Fighter aircraft will soon get AI pilots

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CLASSIC DOGFIGHTS, in which two pilots match wits and machines to shoot down their opponent with well-aimed gunfire, are a thing of the past. Guided missiles have seen to that, and the last recorded instance of such duelling was 32 years ago, near the end of the Iran-Iraq war, when an Iranian F-4 Phantom took out an Iraqi Su-22 with its 20mm cannon. But memory lingers, and dogfighting, even of the simulated sort in which the laws of physics are substituted by equations running inside a computer, is reckoned a good test of the aptitude of a pilot in training. And that is also true when the pilot in question is, itself, a computer program. So, when America's Defence Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), an adventurous arm of the Pentagon, considered the future of air-to-air combat and the role of artificial intelligence (AI) within that future, it began with basics that Manfred von Richthofen himself might have approved of.


Four US companies will develop artificial intelligence for the military

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WASHINGTON, (BM) – The four US companies Boeing, EpiSci, Heron Systems, physicsAI and the Georgia Institute of Technology were selected by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) to develop artificial intelligence for the US military, learned BulgarianMilitary.com. According to information from the site Popular Mechanics, the contract has already been signed and the selected companies and technical institute will have to develop a system of artificial intelligence that will allow in the near future to support American aviation by conducting independent air combat and close combat. The idea of artificial intelligence in military affairs is not recent, but is embedded as a concept in the most militarily developed countries. We are witnessing the United States, Russia and China working hard in this area, and many other countries have military weapons systems that are at the penultimate stage to artificial intelligence – autonomous weapons systems. According to the set characteristics of DARPA, the future artificial intelligence system must be self-taught and draw logical conclusions from its mistakes.


Fighter aircraft will soon get AI pilots

#artificialintelligence

CLASSIC DOGFIGHTS, in which two pilots match wits and machines to shoot down their opponent with well-aimed gunfire, are a thing of the past. Guided missiles have seen to that, and the last recorded instance of such combat was 32 years ago, near the end of the Iran-Iraq war, when an Iranian F-4 Phantom took out an Iraqi Su-22 with its 20mm cannon. But memory lingers, and dogfighting, even of the simulated sort in which the laws of physics are substituted by equations running inside a computer, is reckoned a good test of the aptitude of a pilot in training. And that is also true when the pilot in question is, itself, a computer program. So, when America's Defence Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), an adventurous arm of the Pentagon, considered the future of air-to-air combat and the role of artificial intelligence (AI) within that future, it began with basics that Manfred von Richthofen himself might have approved of.


The Government Is Serious About Creating Mind-Controlled Weapons

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DARPA, the Department of Defense's research arm, is paying scientists to invent ways to instantly read soldiers' minds using tools like genetic engineering of the human brain, nanotechnology and infrared beams. Thought-controlled weapons, like swarms of drones that someone sends to the skies with a single thought or the ability to beam images from one brain to another. This week, DARPA (Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency) announced that six teams will receive funding under the Next-Generation Nonsurgical Neurotechnology (N3) program. Participants are tasked with developing technology that will provide a two-way channel for rapid and seamless communication between the human brain and machines without requiring surgery. "Imagine someone who's operating a drone or someone who might be analyzing a lot of data," said Jacob Robinson, an assistant professor of bioengineering at Rice University, who is leading one of the teams.


Integrated AI Systems

AI Magazine

From Shakey the Robot to self-driving cars, from the personal computer to personal assistants on our phones, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) has led the development of integrated artificial intelligence (AI) systems for more than half a century. From the earliest days of AI, it was apparent that a robust, generally intelligent system should include a complete set of capabilities: perception, memory, reasoning, learning, planning, and action; and when DARPA initiated AI research in the 1960s, ambitious projects such as Shakey the Robot went after the complete package. As DARPA realized the challenges, they backed away from the ultimate goal of integrated AI and tried to make progress on the individual problems of image understanding, speech and language understanding, knowledge representation and reasoning, planning and decision aids, machine learning, and robotic manipulation. Yet, even as researchers struggled to make progress in these subdisciplines, DARPA periodically resurrected the challenge of integrated intelligent systems and pushed the community to try again. In the 1980s, DARPA's Strategic Computing Initiative took on challenges of integrated AI projects such as the Autonomous Land Vehicle and the Pilot's Associate.


DARPA sets sights on making AI self-aware of complex time dimensions

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The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) is setting its sights on developing an AI system with a detailed self-understanding of the time dimensions of its learned knowledge. DARPA's Time-Aware Machine Intelligence (TAMI) research program and incubator is looking to develop a new class of neural network architectures that incorporate an explicit time dimension as a fundamental building block for network knowledge representation," according to the TAMI program solicitation. The overall goal is to create an AI system that will be able to "think in and about time" when exercising its learned task knowledge in task performance. Current neural networks do not explicitly model the inherent time characteristics of their encoded knowledge. Consequently, state-of-the-art machine learning does not have the expressive capability to reason with encoded knowledge using time.


Thwarting adversarial AI with context awareness -- GCN

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Researchers at the University of California at Riverside are working to teach computer vision systems what objects typically exist in close proximity to one another so that if one is altered, the system can flag it, potentially thwarting malicious interference with artificial intelligence systems. The yearlong project, supported by a nearly $1 million grant from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, aims to understand how hackers target machine-vision systems with adversarial AI attacks. Led by Amit Roy-Chowdhury, an electrical and computer engineering professor at the school's Marlan and Rosemary Bourns College of Engineering, the project is part of the Machine Vision Disruption program within DARPA's AI Explorations program. Adversarial AI attacks – which attempt to fool machine learning models by supplying deceptive input -- are gaining attention. "Adversarial attacks can destabilize AI technologies, rendering them less safe, predictable, or reliable," Carnegie Mellon University Professor David Danks wrote in IEEE's Spectrum in February.


Secretive Pentagon research program looks to replace human hackers with AI

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The Joint Operations Center inside Fort Meade in Maryland is a cathedral to cyber warfare. Part of a 380,000-square-foot, $520 million complex opened in 2018, the office is the nerve center for both the U.S. Cyber Command and the National Security Agency as they do cyber battle. Clusters of civilians and military troops work behind dozens of computer monitors beneath a bank of small chiclet windows dousing the room in light. Three 20-foot-tall screens are mounted on a wall below the windows. On most days, two of them are spitting out a constant feed from a secretive program known as "Project IKE." The room looks no different than a standard government auditorium, but IKE represents a radical leap forward. If the Joint Operations Center is the physical embodiment of a new era in cyber warfare -- the art of using computer code to attack and defend targets ranging from tanks to email servers -- IKE is the brains. It tracks every keystroke made by the 200 fighters working on computers below the big screens and churns out predictions about the possibility of success on individual cyber missions. It can automatically run strings of programs and adjusts constantly as it absorbs information. IKE is a far cry from the prior decade of cyber operations, a period of manual combat that involved the most mundane of tools.