autonomy


Driver Assistance Technologies And Levels Of Autonomy Explained: Viable For India?

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Autonomous emergency braking (AEB) is a continuously-on system which detects proximity with obstacles ahead. If the system detects an imminent crash, it warns the driver and primes the braking system. If the driver fails to respond, the car applies the brakes with as much force as necessary to prevent collision. Some AEB systems can also detect cyclists and pedestrians which may be hidden behind a blind spot until its too late. However, this isn't an assistance system -- you can't use an AEB-equipped car to take your foot off the brake in traffic.


AI At The Edge: Creating Coordinated Autonomy

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Today organizations have to deal with so many emergent behaviors that the notion of central control as the only coping mechanism seems to be receding as a dominant management model. Freedom must be doled out further from the centrist idea by creating goals, constraints, boundaries and allowable edge behaviors. Someday software and hardware agents will negotiate their contribution to business outcomes on their own, but until then organizations will have to prepare themselves by managing coordinated autonomy. Edge computing is a form of distributed computing which brings computation and data storage closer to the location where it is needed, to improve response times and provide better actions. Now, AI on Edge, can offer a whole lot of new possibilities.


The artificial intelligence market for automotive and transportation industry in Asia-Pacific is expected to grow at a significant CAGR during the forecast period, 2019-2029

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GNW • Which global factors are expected to impact the artificial intelligence market for automotive and transportation industry in the future? What are the key market strategies being adopted by them? Global Artificial Intelligence Market for Automotive and Transportation Industry Forecast, 2019-2029 In terms of value, the global artificial intelligence market for automotive and transportation industry is expected to grow at a CAGR of 13.12% during the forecast period 2019-2029. The growth in the market is attributable to the ongoing demand for innovative and technologically advanced automotive solutions. Moreover, intelligent solutions which reduce the incidences of human mistakes while driving, along with providing additional features for enhancing ease-of-driving, have driven the market.


AI Spotlight: Paul Scharre On Weapons, Autonomy, And Warfare

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Paul Scharre is a Senior Fellow and Director of the Technology and National Security Program at the Center for a New American Security. He is the award-winning author of Army of None: Autonomous Weapons and the Future of War, which won the 2019 Colby Award and was named one of Bill Gates' top five books of 2018. Aswin Pranam: To start, what classifies as an autonomous weapon? Paul Scharre: An autonomous weapon, quite simply, makes its own decisions of whom to engage in the battlefield. The core challenge is in figuring out which of those decisions matter.


Automotive Radar 2020-2040: Devices, Materials, Processing, AI, Markets, and Players: IDTechEx

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This report investigates the market for radar technology, specifically focusing on automotive applications. It develops a comprehensive technology roadmap, examining the technology at the levels of materials, semiconductor technologies, packaging techniques, antenna array, and signal processing. It demonstrates how radar technology can evolve towards becoming a 4D imaging radar capable of providing a dense 4D point cloud that can enable object detection, classification, and tracking. The report examines the latest product innovations. It identifies and reviews promising start-ups worldwide.


Towards a Framework for Certification of Reliable Autonomous Systems

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

The capability and spread of such systems have reached the point where they are beginning to touch much of everyday life. However, regulators grapple with how to deal with autonomous systems, for example how could we certify an Unmanned Aerial System for autonomous use in civilian airspace? We here analyse what is needed in order to provide verified reliable behaviour of an autonomous system, analyse what can be done as the state-of-the-art in automated verification, and propose a roadmap towards developing regulatory guidelines, including articulating challenges to researchers, to engineers, and to regulators. Case studies in seven distinct domains illustrate the article. Keywords: autonomous systems; certification; verification; Artificial Intelligence 1 Introduction Since the dawn of human history, humans have designed, implemented and adopted tools to make it easier to perform tasks, often improving efficiency, safety, or security.


AI or BS: Distinguishing artificial intelligence from trade show hype

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Though it's a coincidence that I'm writing this article roughly one year after my colleague Khari Johnson railed against the "public nuisance" of "charlatan AI," the annual Consumer Electronics Show (CES) clearly inspired both missives. At the tail end of last year's show, Khari called out a seemingly fake robot AI demo at LG's CES press conference, noting that for society's benefit, "tech companies should spare the world overblown or fabricated pitches of what their AI can do." Having spent last week at CES, I found it painfully obvious that tech companies -- at least some of them -- didn't get the message. Once again, there were plenty of glaring examples of AI BS on the show floor, some standing out like sore thumbs while others blended into the massive event's crowded event halls. AI wasn't always poorly represented, though: There were some legitimate and legitimately exciting examples of artificial intelligence at CES.


U.K. Invests in Revolutionary Artificial Intelligence Warships

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With an aim to help warship crews make quick decisions and process data efficiently, the U.K.'s Ministry of Defense recently announced contracts to use AI-based (artificial intelligence) technology in warships. According to a source, Defense and Security Accelerator (DASA) will be funding £1 million (around US$1.3 million) for AI contracts as part of its "Intelligent Ship – The Next Generation" competition, which is aimed at using innovative approaches for Human-AI and AI-AI teaming for various defense platforms like warships, aircraft, and land vehicles. James Heappey, U.K.'s Defense Minister, said, "The astonishing pace at which global threats are evolving requires new approaches and fresh thinking to the way we develop our ideas and technology. The funding will research pioneering projects into how AI and automation can support our armed forces in their essential day-to-day work." DASA's warship competition, in alliance with the Defense Science and Technology Laboratory (Dstl), is intended to enhance the designs of future defense platforms by using advances in automation, autonomy, machine learning, and AI.


U.K. Invests in Revolutionary Artificial Intelligence Warships

#artificialintelligence

With an aim to help warship crews make quick decisions and process data efficiently, the U.K.'s Ministry of Defense recently announced contracts to use AI-based (artificial intelligence) technology in warships. According to a source, Defense and Security Accelerator (DASA) will be funding £1 million (around US$1.3 million) for AI contracts as part of its "Intelligent Ship – The Next Generation" competition, which is aimed at using innovative approaches for Human-AI and AI-AI teaming for various defense platforms like warships, aircraft, and land vehicles. James Heappey, U.K.'s Defense Minister, said, "The astonishing pace at which global threats are evolving requires new approaches and fresh thinking to the way we develop our ideas and technology. The funding will research pioneering projects into how AI and automation can support our armed forces in their essential day-to-day work." DASA's warship competition, in alliance with the Defense Science and Technology Laboratory (Dstl), is intended to enhance the designs of future defense platforms by using advances in automation, autonomy, machine learning, and AI.


Robot tanks: On patrol but not allowed to shoot

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In 1985 the US pulled the plug on a computer-controlled anti-aircraft tank after a series of debacles in which its electronic brain locked guns onto a stand packed with top generals reviewing the device. Mercifully it didn't fire, but did subsequently attack a portable toilet instead of a target drone. The M247 Sergeant York (pictured above) may have been an embarrassing failure, but digital technology and artificial intelligence (AI) have changed the game since then. Today defence contractors around the world are competing to introduce small unmanned tracked vehicles into military service. Just like an army on the move, there are contrasting views about how far and how fast this technology will advance.