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'It's Our Fault': Nextdoor CEO Takes Blame For Censorship of Black Lives Matter Posts

NPR Technology

In an interview with NPR, Friar outlined steps the popular neighborhood app is planning to take to address reports of racial profiling and censorship on the platform. In an interview with NPR, Friar outlined steps the popular neighborhood app is planning to take to address reports of racial profiling and censorship on the platform. As protests swept the nation following the police killing of George Floyd, there was a surge of reports that Nextdoor, the hyperlocal social media app, was censoring posts about Black Lives Matter and racial injustice. In an interview with NPR, Nextdoor CEO Sarah Friar said the company should have moved more quickly to protect posts related to Black Lives Matter by providing clearer guidance. It "was really our fault" that moderators on forums across the country were deleting those posts, she said. People of color have long accused Nextdoor, which serves as a community bulletin board in more than 265,000 neighborhoods across the U.S., of doing nothing about users' racist comments and complaints.


Man Says He Was Falsely Arrested After Facial Recognition Mistake

NPR Technology

The ACLU has filed a complaint against the Detroit Police Department for what the group says is the first documented instance in the U.S. of someone being falsely arrested based on AI.


'The Computer Got It Wrong': How Facial Recognition Led To A False Arrest In Michigan

NPR Technology

A photo of the alleged suspect in a theft case in Detroit, left, next to the driver's license photo of Robert Williams. An algorithm said Williams was the suspect, but he and his lawyers say the tool produced a false hit. A photo of the alleged suspect in a theft case in Detroit, left, next to the driver's license photo of Robert Williams. An algorithm said Williams was the suspect, but he and his lawyers say the tool produced a false hit. Police in Detroit were trying to figure out who stole five watches from a Shinola retail store.


Amazon Halts Police Use Of Its Facial Recognition Technology

NPR Technology

Amazon announced on Wednesday that it would freeze for one year the use of its facial recognition technology by law enforcement agencies. Amazon announced on Wednesday that it would freeze for one year the use of its facial recognition technology by law enforcement agencies. Amazon announced on Wednesday a one-year moratorium on police use of its facial-recognition technology, yielding to pressure from police-reform advocates and civil rights groups. It is unclear how many law enforcement agencies in the U.S. deploy Amazon's artificial intelligence tool, but an official with the Washington County Sheriff's Office in Oregon confirmed that it will be suspending its use of Amazon's facial recognition technology. Researchers have long criticized the technology for producing inaccurate results for people with darker skin.


Amazon Announces 1-Year Moratorium On Police Use Of Its Facial-Recognition Technology

NPR Technology

When Amazon introduced its facial recognition technology to law enforcement agencies, the tech giant likened it to magic. Now Amazon is telling police, stop using it for the next year. It's a move that signals the impact protests over police brutality are having on the tech industry. And we should note Amazon is a financial supporter of NPR. BOBBY ALLYN, BYLINE: Amazon for years has offered a service called Rekognition to police departments.


How 'Streets Of Rage 4' Reimagined Gaming's Most Iconic Rave

NPR Technology

Axel Stone and friends return to clean up the streets once again in Streets of Rage 4. LizardCube hide caption Axel Stone and friends return to clean up the streets once again in Streets of Rage 4. At the turn of the '90s, the attention of the video game industry was locked onto two major companies battling for the lion's share of a growing industry. One was Nintendo, whose ubiquitous Italian plumber was a household name. The other was SEGA, a brand known for its spiky hedgehog, sure, but also for signaling a specific kind of '90s cool that set itself against other video games of the time. While Nintendo stuck to their family friendly "games-for-all" aesthetic, SEGA put out video games that were thematically riskier and more mature. One of SEGA's biggest titles of that era was Streets of Rage, a beat-'em-up style game released for the Genesis console in 1991.


IBM Abandons Facial Recognition Products, Condemns Racially Biased Surveillance

NPR Technology

IBM announced this week that it would stop selling its facial recognition technology to customers including police departments. The move prompted calls for other tech firms, like Amazon and Microsoft, to do the same. IBM announced this week that it would stop selling its facial recognition technology to customers including police departments. The move prompted calls for other tech firms, like Amazon and Microsoft, to do the same. IBM will no longer provide facial recognition technology to police departments for mass surveillance and racial profiling, Arvind Krishna, IBM's chief executive, wrote in a letter to Congress.


Video Games Don't Have To Be Educational To Spark Learning

NPR Technology

Columnist Kaity Kline says a serious Assassin's Creed: Black Flag habit helped her ace a surprise quiz on the Caribbean. Columnist Kaity Kline says a serious Assassin's Creed: Black Flag habit helped her ace a surprise quiz on the Caribbean. When I was in high school, the best way I could describe myself was as a parent's worst nightmare: I didn't care about my education, didn't do homework, and was known to sleep in class. My SAT score was so bad that I still don't know how I did! My very frustrated mom threw that letter in the trash.


All-Girl Robotics Team In Afghanistan Works On Low-Cost Ventilator ... With Car Parts

NPR Technology

Elham Mansoori, member of Afghan Dreamers, an all-girls robotics team in Afghanistan, works on their prototype of a ventilator. In Afghanistan, a group of teenage girls are trying to build a mechanized, hand-operated ventilator for coronavirus patients, using a design from M.I.T. and parts from old Toyota Corollas. It sounds like an impossible dream, but then again, the all-girls robotics team in question is called the "Afghan Dreamers." Living a country where two-thirds of adolescent girls cannot read or write, they're used to overcoming challenges. The team of some dozen girls aged 15 to 17 was formed three years ago by Roya Mahboob, an Afghan tech entrepreneur who heads the Digital Citizen Fund, a group that runs classes for girls in STEM and robotics and oversees and funds the Afghan Dreamers.


Neither Flood, Nor Fire, Nor Virus Shakes The Virtual Calm Of 'Minecraft'

NPR Technology

When the real world seems too constrained, the endless horizons of Minecraft can be soothing. When the real world seems too constrained, the endless horizons of Minecraft can be soothing. E. closes the door behind him and steps out into the world. I stay put, cooking up ideas for home improvement. We've only known each other for a few months, but once the pandemic threw our lives off balance, we decided to move in together.