Michalowski, Martin


Reports of the Workshops of the Thirty-First AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence

AI Magazine

Reports of the Workshops of the Thirty-First AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence


AFGuide System to Support Personalized Management of Atrial Fibrillation

AAAI Conferences

Atrial fibrillation (AF), the most common arrhythmia with clinical significance, is a serious public health problem. Yet a number of studies show that current AF management is suboptimal due to a knowledge gap between primary care physicians and evidence-based treatment recommendations. This gap is caused by a number of barriers such as a lack of knowledge about new therapies, challenges associated with multi-morbidity, or a lack of patient engagement in therapy planning. The decision support tools proposed to address these barriers handle individual barriers but none of them tackle them comprehensively. Responding to this challenge, we propose AFGuide -- a clinical decision support system to educate and support primary care physicians in developing evidence-based and optimal AF therapies that take into account multi-morbid conditions and patient preferences. AFGuide relies on artificial intelligence techniques (logical reasoning) and preference modeling techniques, and combines them with mobile computing technologies. In this paper we present the design of the system and discuss its proposed implementation and evaluation.


Reports of the 2016 AAAI Workshop Program

AI Magazine

The Workshop Program of the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence's Thirtieth AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence (AAAI-16) was held at the beginning of the conference, February 12-13, 2016. Workshop participants met and discussed issues with a selected focus -- providing an informal setting for active exchange among researchers, developers and users on topics of current interest. To foster interaction and exchange of ideas, the workshops were kept small, with 25-65 participants. Attendance was sometimes limited to active participants only, but most workshops also allowed general registration by other interested individuals.


Reports of the 2016 AAAI Workshop Program

AI Magazine

The Workshop Program of the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence’s Thirtieth AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence (AAAI-16) was held at the beginning of the conference, February 12-13, 2016. Workshop participants met and discussed issues with a selected focus — providing an informal setting for active exchange among researchers, developers and users on topics of current interest. To foster interaction and exchange of ideas, the workshops were kept small, with 25-65 participants. Attendance was sometimes limited to active participants only, but most workshops also allowed general registration by other interested individuals. The AAAI-16 Workshops were an excellent forum for exploring emerging approaches and task areas, for bridging the gaps between AI and other fields or between subfields of AI, for elucidating the results of exploratory research, or for critiquing existing approaches. The fifteen workshops held at AAAI-16 were Artificial Intelligence Applied to Assistive Technologies and Smart Environments (WS-16-01), AI, Ethics, and Society (WS-16-02), Artificial Intelligence for Cyber Security (WS-16-03), Artificial Intelligence for Smart Grids and Smart Buildings (WS-16-04), Beyond NP (WS-16-05), Computer Poker and Imperfect Information Games (WS-16-06), Declarative Learning Based Programming (WS-16-07), Expanding the Boundaries of Health Informatics Using AI (WS-16-08), Incentives and Trust in Electronic Communities (WS-16-09), Knowledge Extraction from Text (WS-16-10), Multiagent Interaction without Prior Coordination (WS-16-11), Planning for Hybrid Systems (WS-16-12), Scholarly Big Data: AI Perspectives, Challenges, and Ideas (WS-16-13), Symbiotic Cognitive Systems (WS-16-14), and World Wide Web and Population Health Intelligence (WS-16-15).


Reports on the 2014 AAAI Fall Symposium Series

AI Magazine

The AAAI 2014 Fall Symposium Series was held Thursday through Saturday, November 13–15, at the Westin Arlington Gateway in Arlington, Virginia adjacent to Washington, DC. The titles of the seven symposia were Artificial Intelligence for Human-Robot Interaction, Energy Market Prediction, Expanding the Boundaries of Health Informatics Using AI, Knowledge, Skill, and Behavior Transfer in Autonomous Robots, Modeling Changing Perspectives: Reconceptualizing Sensorimotor Experiences, Natural Language Access to Big Data, and The Nature of Humans and Machines: A Multidisciplinary Discourse. The highlights of each symposium are presented in this report.


Reports on the 2014 AAAI Fall Symposium Series

AI Magazine

The AAAI 2014 Fall Symposium Series was held Thursday through Saturday, November 13–15, at the Westin Arlington Gateway in Arlington, Virginia adjacent to Washington, DC. The titles of the seven symposia were Artificial Intelligence for Human-Robot Interaction, Energy Market Prediction, Expanding the Boundaries of Health Informatics Using AI, Knowledge, Skill, and Behavior Transfer in Autonomous Robots, Modeling Changing Perspectives: Reconceptualizing Sensorimotor Experiences, Natural Language Access to Big Data, and The Nature of Humans and Machines: A Multidisciplinary Discourse. The highlights of each symposium are presented in this report.


Using First-Order Logic to Represent Clinical Practice Guidelines and to Mitigate Adverse Interactions

AAAI Conferences

Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) were originally designed to help with evidence-based management of a single disease and such a single disease focus has impacted research on CPG computerization. This computerization is mostly concerned with supporting different representation formats and identifying potential inconsistencies in the definitions of CPGs. However, one of the biggest challenges facing physicians is the personalization of multiple CPGs to comorbid patients. Various research initiatives propose ways of mitigating adverse interactions in concurrently applied CPGs, however, there are no attempts to develop a generalized framework for mitigation that captures generic characteristics of the problem while handling nuances such as precedence relationships. In this paper we present our research towards developing a mitigation framework that relies on a first-order logic-based representation and related theorem proving and model finding techniques. The application of the proposed framework is illustrated with a simple clinical example.



The AAAI-13 Conference Workshops

AI Magazine

The AAAI-13 Workshop Program, a part of the 27th AAAI Conference on Artificial Intelligence, was held Sunday and Monday, July 14–15, 2013 at the Hyatt Regency Bellevue Hotel in Bellevue, Washington, USA. The program included 12 workshops covering a wide range of topics in artificial intelligence, including Activity Context-Aware System Architectures (WS-13-05); Artificial Intelligence and Robotics Methods in Computational Biology (WS-13-06); Combining Constraint Solving with Mining and Learning (WS-13-07); Computer Poker and Imperfect Information (WS-13-08); Expanding the Boundaries of Health Informatics Using Artificial Intelligence (WS-13-09); Intelligent Robotic Systems (WS-13-10); Intelligent Techniques for Web Personalization and Recommendation (WS-13-11); Learning Rich Representations from Low-Level Sensors (WS-13-12); Plan, Activity, and Intent Recognition (WS-13-13); Space, Time, and Ambient Intelligence (WS-13-14); Trading Agent Design and Analysis (WS-13-15); and Statistical Relational Artificial Intelligence (WS-13-16).


Preface

AAAI Conferences

The theme of this workshop is encapsulated by a keynote given by Mark Musen, MD: “Artificial Intelligence in Medicine: It's Back to the Future.” In his talk, Dr. Musen will summarize the 30-year history of artificial intelligence in medicine including its successes and failures, and discuss current challenges and opportunities that have been made possible by recent technological and organizational changes. The rest of the program is structured along two main tracks that showcase applications of AI techniques and methods in health informatics and that present new theoretical and methodological developments on the boundary of AI and medicine.