Expert Systems


The Terminology of Artificial Intelligence Part 2

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Professor Edward Feigenbaum, while explaining the meaning of Al to a distinguished and perplexed scientific review panel for a Department of Defense AI application development program in the late 1970s commented, "If it works, it isn't AI." Because AI has been a subject of considerable interest, a number of suppliers and developers of software products have embraced the technology and offer products or demonstrations that "contain AI" It is possible that some of this labeling might be controversial among those who have worked in the field for some time. Since most AI appears as a software of some sort, many practitioners of conventional software development can recognize aspects of AI programs that could be accomplished with conventional technology. An industrial engineer replaced an electromechanical controller on a large machine with an electronic controller which included a CRT display. Upon being told the rudimentary aspects of AI technology, the industrial engineer suddenly exclaimed, "Wow, I've been doing AI all along!"


Uncovering Probabilistic Implications in Typological Knowledge Bases

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

The study of linguistic typology is rooted in the implications we find between linguistic features, such as the fact that languages with object-verb word ordering tend to have post-positions. Uncovering such implications typically amounts to time-consuming manual processing by trained and experienced linguists, which potentially leaves key linguistic universals unexplored. In this paper, we present a computational model which successfully identifies known universals, including Greenberg universals, but also uncovers new ones, worthy of further linguistic investigation. Our approach outperforms baselines previously used for this problem, as well as a strong baseline from knowledge base population.


What If Artificial Intelligence (AI) & Machine Learning (ML) Ruled the World?

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What if instead of political parties, presidents, prime ministers, kings, queens, armies, autocrats, and who knows what else, we turned everything over to expert systems? What if we engineered them to be faithful, for example, to one simple principle: "human beings regardless of age, gender, race, origin, religion, location, intelligence, income or wealth, should be treated equally, fairly and consistently"? Here's some dialogue – enabled by natural language processing (NLP) – with an expert system named "Decider" that operates from that single principle (you can imagine how it might behave if the principle was completely different – the opposite of equal and fair). The principle is supported by the data and probabilities the system collects and interprets. The "inferences" made by Decider are pre-programmed.


r/artificial - I cant conceive of a machine actually seeing colors like we do. The only thing I can see is possible is a computer simply having knowledge based on what color is what. Like having a number represent what color is there but not actually seeing it. Is this how AI works? I cant find anything on google.

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Take for instance a computer that records a video and can recognize objects in the video, sure it has a data warehouse somewhere of what each object is, and if it doesn't it could add one once it "learns" what it is. But realistically how is that different from humans? Humans don't know what a color is until they learn what it is, I didn't know red was red until someone told me, and red is only red because it is generally agreed upon what the word red represents. If I see a color and tell you it's red, and an a.i.


What If Artificial Intelligence (AI) & Machine Learning (ML) Ruled the World?

#artificialintelligence

What if instead of political parties, presidents, prime ministers, kings, queens, armies, autocrats, and who knows what else, we turned everything over to expert systems? What if we engineered them to be faithful, for example, to one simple principle: "human beings regardless of age, gender, race, origin, religion, location, intelligence, income or wealth, should be treated equally, fairly and consistently"? Here's some dialogue – enabled by natural language processing (NLP) – with an expert system named "Decider" that operates from that single principle (you can imagine how it might behave if the principle was completely different – the opposite of equal and fair). The principle is supported by the data and probabilities the system collects and interprets. The "inferences" made by Decider are pre-programmed.


The State of Dark Data - Research Report - www.smtware.com

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SMT is a data-driven solution provider. The SMT Enriched Data Analytics Platform provides insight into your data and supports answering important, business-critical questions. Our technical experts are eager to help with our services, best-practices and SMT apps to achieve your business goals.


Neural Query Language: A Knowledge Base Query Language for Tensorflow

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

Large knowledge bases (KBs) are useful for many AI tasks, but are difficult to integrate into modern gradient-based learning systems. Here we describe a framework for accessing soft symbolic database using only differentiable operators. For example, this framework makes it easy to conveniently write neural models that adjust confidences associated with facts in a soft KB; incorporate prior knowledge in the form of hand-coded KB access rules; or learn to instantiate query templates using information extracted from text. NQL can work well with KBs with millions of tuples and hundreds of thousands of entities on a single GPU.


Domain Adaptive Transfer Learning for Fault Diagnosis

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Thanks to digitization of industrial assets in fleets, the ambitious goal of transferring fault diagnosis models fromone machine to the other has raised great interest. Solving these domain adaptive transfer learning tasks has the potential to save large efforts on manually labeling data and modifying models for new machines in the same fleet. Although data-driven methods have shown great potential in fault diagnosis applications, their ability to generalize on new machines and new working conditions are limited because of their tendency to overfit to the training set in reality. One promising solution to this problem is to use domain adaptation techniques. It aims to improve model performance on the target new machine. Inspired by its successful implementation in computer vision, we introduced Domain-Adversarial Neural Networks (DANN) to our context, along with two other popular methods existing in previous fault diagnosis research. We then carefully justify the applicability of these methods in realistic fault diagnosis settings, and offer a unified experimental protocol for a fair comparison between domain adaptation methods for fault diagnosis problems.


Knowledge-based multi-level aggregation for decision aid in the machining industry

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

In the context of Industry 4.0, data management is a key point for decision aid approaches. Large amounts of manufacturing digital data are collected on the shop floor. Their analysis can then require a large amount of computing power. The Big Data issue can be solved by aggregation, generating smart and meaningful data. This paper presents a new knowledge-based multi-level aggregation strategy to support decision making. Manufacturing knowledge is used at each level to design the monitoring criteria or aggregation operators. The proposed approach has been implemented as a demonstrator and successfully applied to a real machining database from the aeronautic industry. Decision Making; Machining; Knowledge based system


Lie on the Fly: Strategic Voting in an Iterative Preference Elicitation Process

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

A voting center is in charge of collecting and aggregating voter preferences. In an iterative process, the center sends comparison queries to voters, requesting them to submit their preference between two items. Voters might discuss the candidates among themselves, figuring out during the elicitation process which candidates stand a chance of winning and which do not. Consequently, strategic voters might attempt to manipulate by deviating from their true preferences and instead submit a different response in order to attempt to maximize their profit. We provide a practical algorithm for strategic voters which computes the best manipulative vote and maximizes the voter's selfish outcome when such a vote exists. We also provide a careful voting center which is aware of the possible manipulations and avoids manipulative queries when possible. In an empirical study on four real-world domains, we show that in practice manipulation occurs in a low percentage of settings and has a low impact on the final outcome. The careful voting center reduces manipulation even further, thus allowing for a non-distorted group decision process to take place. We thus provide a core technology study of a voting process that can be adopted in opinion or information aggregation systems and in crowdsourcing applications, e.g., peer grading in Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs).