Chess


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AI Magazine

Carnegie-Mellon University's Hitech chess computer scored 5-1 in the National Open Chess Championships held in Chicago March 18-20. The Championship Section in which Hitech competed, had 380 entries. The Championship Section in which Hitech competed, had 380 entries. There was a six-way tie for first with 5.5 points between: International Grandmaster Mikhail Tal (a former world champion), International Grandmaster Sergey Kudrin, FIDE Master Michael Brooks, International Master James Rizzitano, International Master Calvin Blocker, and International Grandmaster Leonid Shamkovich. Tied for seventh with 5 points were: National Master Hitech, International Grandmaster Maxim Dlugy, International Grandmaster Walter Browne, International Grandmaster Arthur Bisguier, and nine others.


Modern Masters of an Ancient Game

AI Magazine

Deep Blue beat world chess champion Gary Kasparov in the final game of a tied, six-game match last May 11. Kasparov had beaten the machine in an earlier match held in February 1996. The Fredkin Prize was awarded under the auspices of AAAI; funds had been held in trust at Carnegie Mellon University. The Fredkin Prize was originally established at Carnegie Mellon University 17 years ago by Massachusetts Institute of Technology Computer Science Professor Edward Fredkin to encourage continued research progress in computer chess. The first award of $5,000 was given to two scientists from Bell Laboratories who in 1981 developed the first chess machine to achieve master status.


Deus Ex Machina -- A Higher Creative Species in the Game of Chess

AI Magazine

The basic paradigm that computer programs employ is known as "search and evaluate." Their static evaluation is arguably more primitive than the perceptual one of humans. Yet the intelligence emerging from them is phenomenal. A human spectator is not able to tell the difference between a brilliant computer game and one played by Kasparov. Chess played by today's machines looks extraordinary, full of imagination and creativity.


Column

AI Magazine

The items in this collage were selected from the AI TOPICS Web site's "AI in the News" collection that can be found--complete with links to the item's source and related AI TOPICS pages--at www. Please note that: (1) an excerpt may not reflect the overall tenor of the item, nor contain all of the relevant information; and, (2) all items are offered "as is" and the fact that an item has been selected does not imply any endorsement whatsoever. "In a special collection of articles published beginning 1 July 2005, Science Magazine and its online companion sites celebrate the journal's 125th anniversary with a look forward -- at the most compelling puzzles and questions facing scientists today. A special, free news feature in Science explores 125 big questions that face scientific inquiry over the next quarter-century…." What Is the Biological Basis of Consciousness? "For centuries, debating the nature of consciousness was the exclusive purview of philosophers.


Human Versus Machine

AI Magazine

"Years before the first computer was actually built, the famous British mathematician Alan Turing envisaged it playing chess and beating the human world champion. When the very first computers were delivered to the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory in the 1950s the scientists there immediately started to program it to play chess. For 50 years one of the recurring motifs of the science of artificial intelligence was a chess computer beating the world champion. It was almost an obsession in the community, with scores of teams in dozens of universities dedicating their academic careers to achieve this goal." Who should explore space, man or machine?


Highlights Developments in the AI Field

AI Magazine

"A computer beat the world champion at chess. A robot is on Mars making a few of its own decisions." Kuipers reminded us that these accomplishments are the result of 40 years of research; AI is much older than the technical sessions at this year's conference. This year's conference not only celebrated AI's visible achievements, noted Kuipers. At its heart, it is a technical conference.


A 'Brief' History of Game AI Up To AlphaGo, Part 1

#artificialintelligence

This is the first part of'A Brief History of Game AI Up to AlphaGo'. Part 2 is here and part 3 is here. In this part, we shall cover the birth of AI and the very first game-playing AI programs to run on digital computers. On March 9th of 2016, a historic milestone for AI was reached when the Google-engineered program AlphaGo defeated the world-class Go champion Lee Sedol. Go is a two-player strategy board game like Chess, but the larger number of possible moves and difficulty of evaluation make Go the harder problem for AI.


Kasparov on Deep Learning in chess

#artificialintelligence

Many years ago I was with Garry Kasparov for an event in London's Home House, and there we had dinner with a young lad, a former child prodigy in chess, one who had reached master level (Elo 2300) at the age of 13 and captained a number English junior chess teams. It was an interesting encounter with the boy enthusiastically describing a computer game he was developing. After he left I said to Garry: "That's a cocky young fellow!" "But very smart," Garry replied. And we left it at that. More than twenty years later I had occasion to contact him again.


Kasparov on Deep Learning in chess

#artificialintelligence

Many years ago I was with Garry Kasparov for an event in London's Home House, and there we had dinner with a young lad, a former child prodigy in chess, one who had reached master level (Elo 2300) at the age of 13 and captained a number English junior chess teams. It was an interesting encounter with the boy enthusiastically describing a computer game he was developing. After he left I said to Garry: "That's a cocky young fellow!" "But very smart," Garry replied. And we left it at that. More than twenty years later I had occasion to contact him again.


Google's AI became the world's best chess player in just four hours

#artificialintelligence

Four hours is all it took for Google's DeepMind artificial intelligence program to learn everything there was to know about chess, The Telegraph reported Wednesday. DeepMind's AlphaZero program, which teaches itself from scratch, achieved "superhuman" knowledge of chess in less than the amount of time you'd spend, say, watching the extended version of The Lord of the Rings: Return of the King. Chess has long been used to test the ability of artificial intelligence because the game's rigid structure is ideal for programming a computer with rules, and then letting it run its own tests against those rules. AlphaZero started this experiment knowing only the basics of chess gameplay, but by playing thousands of games against itself, AlphaZero updated its neural network with information about the effectiveness of certain moves -- over and over again, until it became the best chess player in the known universe. "The games AlphaZero played ... are far beyond anything humans or chess computers have come up with," said David Kramaley, a chess education expert.