Chess


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A dozen or so companies are well-positioned to reap big profits from the burgeoning market for artificial intelligence (AI), Barron's reports. Among these companies are: semiconductor manufacturers Micron Technology Inc. (MU) and Nvidia Corp. (NVDA); Google parent Alphabet Inc. (GOOGL); database management software developer Oracle Corp. (ORCL); online merchant and cloud-computing leader Amazon.com In 1997, IBM scored a major milestone in AI history when its Deep Blue program beat reigning world chess champion Gary Kasparov, still considered by many experts to be the best player of all time. IBM's Watson question answering system passed a high-profile test in 2011, beating two top former champs on Jeopardy!, the long-running quiz show on TV. Since then, Watson has been rolled out for general commercial use, most notably to aid doctors in making diagnoses.


General's Intelligence Vs Artificial Intelligence – Can Military Strategy become an Algorithm?

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Besides being exactly a year before India conducted its second nuclear tests, it is the day that IBM's Deep Blue computer made Gary Kasparov, the human world champion, concede defeat in less than 20 moves in the 6th Game of Chess that they played together. Kasparov reflect today, 20 years later, in his book "Deep Thinking – where machine intelligence ends and human creativity begins", even if he would have won, it was just a matter of time when computers would have started winning. Given the Clausewitz's fog of war and military incompetence inherent in the psychology of human Military Generals, a case for AI based military generals can be made. He developed the'Quantified Judgement Method of Analysis' (QJMA) based upon analysis of historical war data which was published in his book "Numbers, Prediction and War".


Deep Blue, DeepStack & Holly - AI in the past, present & future Trade-Ideas

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While in 1996 Garry Kasparov won 4 to 2 against IBM s super-computer Deep Blue, in 1997 Deep Blue won against Garry Kasparov. In March 2017, for the very first time, Artificial Intelligence won Heads-Up No-Limit Texas Hold'em against 33 poker players from 17 different nations. You don't have to be a chess or a poker player to see that Artificial Intelligence means a giant advantage. The crucial advantage is the fact that Trade Ideas is continuously innovating year by year, month by month and even day by day--this is highlighted with the introduction of Holly, the Trade Ideas Artificial Intelligence engine and a testament to their agile development model.


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When IBM's Deep Blue chess computer defeated the world champion Garry Kasparov in 1997, humanity let out a collective sigh, recognising the loss of an essential human territory to the onslaught of thinking machines. And not just against them: for the past two decades, Kasparov has been exploring an idea he calls'Advanced Chess', where humans collaborate with computer chess programs against other hybrid teams, sometimes called'Centaurs'. We rely on computational systems for our essential aesthetic vocabulary, learning what is good and beautiful through a prism of five-star rating systems and social-media endorsements, all closely watched over by algorithmic critics of loving grace. Many artists today explore the seams and rough edges of digital platforms, creating art out of the glitches and unintended juxtapositions that they can eke out of increasingly complicated creative systems.


Poker Is Harder for AI to Master Than Chess. AI has Now Learned to Bluff and Beat Humans.

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The list of recent defeats where humans were overmatched by machines are well-known: chess champion Garry Kasparov losing against IBM's Deep Blue, Jeopardy wiz Ken Jennings being soundly defeated by IBM's Watson, and Go champion Lee Sodol losing to Google's AlphaGo. This is particularly surprising because unlike games like chess and Go, where the information is upfront and know ("Perfect Information Games"), poker involves a great deal of hidden information ("Imperfect Information Games") and the seemingly-human characteristic of bluffing. While the humans-versus-Libratus event was billed as Brains Versus Artificial Intelligence, it may be better to think it as Human Brains versus AI Brains. Unlike mastering a set of rules--what IBM's Deep Blue did for chess and Google's AlphaGo did for Go--the success of Libratus may indicate a potential future where AI assists humans in tasks involving negotiation and other situations where the available facts are incomplete.


Marine Biologist Dives Into Deep Blue Sinkhole In Great Barrier Reef

International Business Times

While diving down between 50 feet and 65 feet, according to Gaskell's post, he found colonies of birdsnest corals and staghorn corals, "both of which were among the biggest and most delicate colonies I've ever seen." The Great Barrier Reef is the largest reef and the largest living structure in the world, bigger than the Great Wall of China, and it can be seen from space. In the case of the underwater sinkhole in the Great Barrier Reef that Gaskell found, the corals in there were "totally unaffected by the cyclone," he wrote on Instagram. According to the marine biologist's Instagram post, "We may very well be the first to ever dive Gaskell's Blue Hole as it was so far offshore and hidden deep within one of the Great Barrier Reef's biggest lagoons."


A new Partnership between Humans and Machines in Healthcare

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The surprising insight of those tournaments is that the teams with the strongest human / machine partnership dominate even the strongest computer. So if a 7 minute consultation today, involves 6 minutes of activities that will be automated, can we please fight for a system that rewards compassion and other human values that are so desperately needed in the healthcare system and will hardly be replaced by robots or machines. It is time we start actively lead and design our future healthcare systems, so we also have time to redefine the value system healthcare is based on. Bart is involved in leading edge technologies leading the Digital Health Business for IBM DACH, he has been intimate involved as a mentor in the formation and growth of a dozen startups within the healthcare sector.


Man versus Artificial Intelligence: From Deep Blue to DeepMind in 20 Years – Besim on Data

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Garry Kasparov and DeepMind's CEO Demis Hassabis discuss Garry's new book "Deep Thinking: Where Machine Intelligence Ends and Human Creativity Begins ", his chess match with IBM Deep Blue and his thoughts on the future of AI in the world of chess. In May 1997, the world watched as Garry Kasparov, the greatest chess player in the world, was defeated for the first time by the IBM supercomputer Deep Blue. During the twenty years since playing Deep Blue, he's played both with and against machines, learning a great deal about our vital relationship with our most remarkable creations. It means you have to change certain habits and certain customs and what was important for me that's what I learned from my mother is that my game was not just about win it was also about making a difference and that's what helped me to make a transition later on in my life from playing chess being number one chess player for 20 years two other things that I'm doing now not pretending that I could be number one and repeat my outstanding achievements in the game of chess but still recognizing that I'm quite useful.


Man versus Artificial Intelligence: From Deep Blue to DeepMind in 20 Years – Besim on Data

#artificialintelligence

Garry Kasparov and DeepMind's CEO Demis Hassabis discuss Garry's new book "Deep Thinking: Where Machine Intelligence Ends and Human Creativity Begins ", his chess match with IBM Deep Blue and his thoughts on the future of AI in the world of chess. In May 1997, the world watched as Garry Kasparov, the greatest chess player in the world, was defeated for the first time by the IBM supercomputer Deep Blue. During the twenty years since playing Deep Blue, he's played both with and against machines, learning a great deal about our vital relationship with our most remarkable creations. It means you have to change certain habits and certain customs and what was important for me that's what I learned from my mother is that my game was not just about win it was also about making a difference and that's what helped me to make a transition later on in my life from playing chess being number one chess player for 20 years two other things that I'm doing now not pretending that I could be number one and repeat my outstanding achievements in the game of chess but still recognizing that I'm quite useful.


Man versus Artificial Intelligence: From Deep Blue to DeepMind in 20 Years – Besim on Data

#artificialintelligence

Garry Kasparov and DeepMind's CEO Demis Hassabis discuss Garry's new book "Deep Thinking: Where Machine Intelligence Ends and Human Creativity Begins ", his chess match with IBM Deep Blue and his thoughts on the future of AI in the world of chess. In May 1997, the world watched as Garry Kasparov, the greatest chess player in the world, was defeated for the first time by the IBM supercomputer Deep Blue. During the twenty years since playing Deep Blue, he's played both with and against machines, learning a great deal about our vital relationship with our most remarkable creations. It means you have to change certain habits and certain customs and what was important for me that's what I learned from my mother is that my game was not just about win it was also about making a difference and that's what helped me to make a transition later on in my life from playing chess being number one chess player for 20 years two other things that I'm doing now not pretending that I could be number one and repeat my outstanding achievements in the game of chess but still recognizing that I'm quite useful.