Chess


Man versus Artificial Intelligence: From Deep Blue to DeepMind in 20 Years – Besim on Data

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Garry Kasparov and DeepMind's CEO Demis Hassabis discuss Garry's new book "Deep Thinking: Where Machine Intelligence Ends and Human Creativity Begins ", his chess match with IBM Deep Blue and his thoughts on the future of AI in the world of chess. In May 1997, the world watched as Garry Kasparov, the greatest chess player in the world, was defeated for the first time by the IBM supercomputer Deep Blue. During the twenty years since playing Deep Blue, he's played both with and against machines, learning a great deal about our vital relationship with our most remarkable creations. It means you have to change certain habits and certain customs and what was important for me that's what I learned from my mother is that my game was not just about win it was also about making a difference and that's what helped me to make a transition later on in my life from playing chess being number one chess player for 20 years two other things that I'm doing now not pretending that I could be number one and repeat my outstanding achievements in the game of chess but still recognizing that I'm quite useful.


Man versus Artificial Intelligence: From Deep Blue to DeepMind in 20 Years – Besim on Data

#artificialintelligence

Garry Kasparov and DeepMind's CEO Demis Hassabis discuss Garry's new book "Deep Thinking: Where Machine Intelligence Ends and Human Creativity Begins ", his chess match with IBM Deep Blue and his thoughts on the future of AI in the world of chess. In May 1997, the world watched as Garry Kasparov, the greatest chess player in the world, was defeated for the first time by the IBM supercomputer Deep Blue. During the twenty years since playing Deep Blue, he's played both with and against machines, learning a great deal about our vital relationship with our most remarkable creations. It means you have to change certain habits and certain customs and what was important for me that's what I learned from my mother is that my game was not just about win it was also about making a difference and that's what helped me to make a transition later on in my life from playing chess being number one chess player for 20 years two other things that I'm doing now not pretending that I could be number one and repeat my outstanding achievements in the game of chess but still recognizing that I'm quite useful.


Man versus Artificial Intelligence: From Deep Blue to DeepMind in 20 Years – Besim on Data

#artificialintelligence

Garry Kasparov and DeepMind's CEO Demis Hassabis discuss Garry's new book "Deep Thinking: Where Machine Intelligence Ends and Human Creativity Begins ", his chess match with IBM Deep Blue and his thoughts on the future of AI in the world of chess. In May 1997, the world watched as Garry Kasparov, the greatest chess player in the world, was defeated for the first time by the IBM supercomputer Deep Blue. During the twenty years since playing Deep Blue, he's played both with and against machines, learning a great deal about our vital relationship with our most remarkable creations. It means you have to change certain habits and certain customs and what was important for me that's what I learned from my mother is that my game was not just about win it was also about making a difference and that's what helped me to make a transition later on in my life from playing chess being number one chess player for 20 years two other things that I'm doing now not pretending that I could be number one and repeat my outstanding achievements in the game of chess but still recognizing that I'm quite useful.


Blue state GOP gov digs in as Dems vow takedown - Kamala Harris spends big with media firm that boosted Bernie Sanders' national profile

FOX News

"The latest polling that we have shows about 6 percent of the people in Maryland strongly disapprove of the job I'm doing," Hogan told Fox News, during a recent event in voter-rich Montgomery County. Roughly half the state's 3.9 million voters are registered Democrats; Republicans haven't controlled the General Assembly since the early 1900s; the last GOP senator was elected to Congress in 1970; and a Democrat has been governor in roughly 42 of the past 49 years. "If Democrats are raring to steal one back from Trump, then Maryland is ripe for the picking," said Maryland Republican Party official Rob Carter, who suggested recent polling data shows Democrats in the state are "as strong as ever, even a little bit stronger." "But you have to show up and have a message that appeals to voters," said Edwards, elected to four terms with an average 79 percent of the general election vote before losing a 2016 Senate bid.


The Bots Beat Us. Now What?

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He hadn't played a recorded game of chess for five years, since defeating Boris Spassky and the Soviet machine in the match of the century in Reykjavik, Iceland, capturing the world championship and becoming an American Cold War hero. Bobby Fischer, the troubled American chess hero, embarrassed a chess-playing computer in 1977. We lost our collective opposable-thumb grip on chess roughly 20 years earlier, when our human representative Garry Kasparov, a world chess champion, fell in a six-game match at the hands of IBM's supercomputer called Deep Blue. Campbell, a former student of Berliner's, still works on artificial intelligence at IBM, where he has won the company chess championship the past two years.


A Brutal Intelligence: AI, Chess, and the Human Mind - Los Angeles Review of Books

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Fascination with digital computers intensified during the 1950s, and the so-called "thinking machines" began to influence theories about the human mind. It took only a few decades after Shannon wrote his paper for engineers to build a computer that could play chess brilliantly. Even though it was the first time a machine had beaten a world champion in a formal match, to computer scientists and chess masters alike the outcome wasn't much of a surprise. Whereas most software programs apply rules to data, machine-learning algorithms do the reverse: they distill rules from data, and then apply those rules to make judgments about new situations.


Garry Kasparov: "Deep Thinking" Talks at Google

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Garry Kasparov and DeepMind's CEO Demis Hassabis discuss Garry's new book "Deep Thinking", his match with Deep Blue and his thoughts on the future of AI in the world of chess. Chess has long been the fulcrum in development of machine intelligence; the hoax automaton'The Turk' in the 18th century and Alan Turing's first chess program in 1952 were two early examples of the quest for machines to think like humans -- a talent we measured by their ability to beat their creators at chess. During the twenty years since playing Deep Blue, he's played both with and against machines, learning a great deal about our vital relationship with our most remarkable creations. In this breakthrough book, Kasparov tells his side of the story of Deep Blue for the first time -- what it was like to strategize against an implacable, untiring opponent -- the mistakes he made and the reasons the odds were against him.


Garry Kasparov on intelligent machines - The Manufacturer

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In 1997, the world chess champion Garry Kasparov went into battle with a chess-playing computer, Deep Blue, and lost. It's not hard to understand why opponents found Garry Kasparov so formidable. Garry Kasparov was at Hay to discuss his new book Deep Thinking, the product of two decades' research into artificial intelligence (AI), machine learning and our relationship with both. Of course, Google has just taken the issue into new territory with AlphaGo, that beat the world champion Go player by combining brute force computing with machine learning and deep neural networks.


20 Years after Deep Blue: How AI Has Advanced Since Conquering Chess

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Twenty years ago IBM's Deep Blue computer stunned the world by becoming the first machine to beat a reigning world chess champion in a six-game match. Chess-playing calculators emerged in the late 1970s but it would be another decade before a team of Carnegie Mellon University graduate students built the first computer--called Deep Thought--to beat a grand master in a regular tournament game. I was part of a group of graduate students at Carnegie Mellon University that IBM approached. IBM noticed the successes that we were having building this machine on a shoestring budget and thought it would be interesting to have a group of us join IBM Research [in late 1989] to develop the next generation of this machine, called Deep Blue.


Centaur Chess Shows Power of Teaming Human and Machine

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The story of IBM's Deep Blue computer defeating world chess champion Garry Kasparov in 1997 has been told so many times that it's practically shorthand for the philosophical debate over man vs. machine. Teaming the two in chess, experts say, produces a force that plays better chess than either humans or computers can manage on their own. The Freestyle games are timed, forcing players to think on their feet while managing the clock. "If you merge millions of games played by computers with high-caliber human games, you get something that is quantitatively and qualitatively superior to any commercial product," says Nelson Hernandez, a suburban Washington D.C. data analyst who is a member of one of the most successful Freestyle teams in history.