Chess


Artificial Stupidity - Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists

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I learned a few things from reading an excerpt from Yuval Noah Harari's book, 21 Lessons for the 21st Century, published in the October issue of The Atlantic. One is that it took a Google machine-learning program just four hours to teach itself and master chess, once the pinnacle of centuries of human intellectual effort, easily defeating the top-ranked computer chess engine in the world. Another is that artificial intelligence systems may be inherently anti-democratic and anti-human. New heights of computing power and data processing make it more efficient to centralize systems in authoritarian governments, Harari says, and will render humans increasingly irrelevant. "By 2050," he writes, "a useless class might emerge, the result not only of a shortage of jobs or a lack of relevant education but also of insufficient mental stamina to continue learning new skills."


The Box That AI Lives In

Slate

Listen to Secret History of the Future via Apple Podcasts, Overcast, Spotify, Stitcher, or Google Play. It's 1783, and Paris is gripped by the prospect of a chess match. One of the contestants is François-André Philidor, who is considered the greatest chess player in Paris, and possibly the world. Everyone is so excited because Philidor is about to go head-to-head with the other biggest sensation in the chess world at the time. This story may sound a lot like Garry Kasparov taking on Deep Blue, IBM's chess-playing supercomputer.


This Is What Artificial Intelligence Is. And It's NOT What You Think... - Altucher Confidential

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Artificial intelligence is not "intelligence". Everyone is afraid that AI will suddenly wake up, get upset and take over the world. Or that AI will wake up and take all of our jobs. Below I describe what real AI is. Then, if you are at a cocktail party and someone says, "But what if robots are intelligent?", Statistics is at the heart of most AI programs.


North Carolina Acts Deep Blue With State Worker Minimum Wage

U.S. News

Republicans embraced the "living wage" phrase despite sharing little with the "Fight for 15" movement that started in 2012. Since then more than 20 states and 40 cities have raised their minimum wages for millions of state and nongovernment workers, according to the National Employment Law Project. San Francisco became the first major city last month to reach $15.


Opinion Retooling time for Artificial Intelligence

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Artificial Intelligence (AI) has come a long way since Alan Turing proposed the Turing test in 1950. In last few years, the field of AI has taken some spectacular strides forward, from IBM's Deep Blue computer defeating Gary Kasparov in 1997 to the myriad autonomous cars currently being tested. The major advantages of Deep Blue lay in its memory and computation powers. It could compute faster and thereby it could analyse potential positions more accurately than a human. But this computer could not learn anything by itself.


The Real Payoff From Artificial Intelligence Is Still a Decade Off

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It has been 21 years since IBM's Deep Blue supercomputer checkmated chess champion Garry Kasparov, marking a historic moment in the development of artificial intelligence technologies. Since then, artificial intelligence has invaded everyday objects, such as cell phones, cars, fridges, and televisions. But the world economy seems to have little to show for the proliferation of smartness. Among advanced economies, productivity growth is slower now than at any time in the past five decades. National GDPs and standards of living, meanwhile, have been relatively stagnant for years.


The Real Payoff From Artificial Intelligence Is Still a Decade Off

#artificialintelligence

It has been 21 years since IBM's Deep Blue supercomputer checkmated chess champion Garry Kasparov, marking a historic moment in the development of artificial intelligence technologies. Since then, artificial intelligence has invaded everyday objects, such as cell phones, cars, fridges, and televisions. But the world economy seems to have little to show for the proliferation of smartness. Among advanced economies, productivity growth is slower now than at any time in the past five decades. National GDPs and standards of living, meanwhile, have been relatively stagnant for years.


The Honest Trailer for Deep Blue Sea Will Bite You Clean in Half

Slate

Once every couple of years, a film comes along that jolts the country awake, redefines a genre, and really makes us think. Deep Blue Sea, the 1999 shark thriller, that starred Samuel L. Jackson, LL Cool J, and Saffron Burrows, did not do any of those things. It follows a group of scientists in an underwater facility who are doing research on Alzheimer's disease and for whatever reason, they're using sharks for the experiments. Somehow, they genetically engineer one shark to be super-intelligent and aggressive, which then wreaks havoc, trapping them in the facility and killing most of the crew. The plot is so convoluted, that you probably wouldn't be able to explain it without looking it up (which I had to do, despite having seen the movie several times).


Memory, Search and Sense: A Theory about Nesting and Abstraction

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

This paper describes an automatic process for combining patterns and features, to guide a search process and reason about it. It is based on the functionality that a human brain might have, which is a highly distributed network of simple neuronal components that can apply some level of matching and cross-referencing over retrieved patterns. The process uses memory in a more dynamic way and it can realise results using a shallow hierarchy, which is a recognised brain-like construct. The paper gives one example of the process, using computer chess as a case study. The second half of the paper then presents a formal language for describing the global pattern sequences and transitions. These pattern ensembles are created from the same techniques that the search and prediction processes require and they define an outer framework that a distributed setup can try to learn. They can also be created automatically, resulting in further functionality for the generic cognitive model.


John McCarthy -- Father of AI and Lisp -- Dies at 84

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When IBM's Deep Blue supercomputer won its famous chess rematch with then world champion Garry Kasparov in May 1997, the victory was hailed far and wide as a triumph of artificial intelligence. But John McCarthy – the man who coined the term and pioneered the field of AI research – didn't see it that way. As far back as the mid-60s, chess was called the "Drosophila of artificial intelligence" – a reference to the fruit flies biologists used to uncover the secrets of genetics – and McCarthy believed his successors in AI research had taken the analogy too far. "Computer chess has developed much as genetics might have if the geneticists had concentrated their efforts starting in 1910 on breeding racing Drosophila," McCarthy wrote following Deep Blue's win. "We would have some science, but mainly we would have very fast fruit flies."