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How Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning Impact Project

#artificialintelligence

In this article, we will discuss what I believe is one of the most significant issues facing the future of project management. Let me start by asking 3 questions. If you're a project manager and don't know the answers to those three questions, I suggest you read further because your career might depend on knowing them. So why is the 5th of December 2017 a significant date for those of us who take even a cursory interest in the development of AI and machine learning or what we call ML? The 5th of December 2017 was a pretty special day; on that day, one computer beat another computer at the Top Chess Engine Championship.


Will You Survive the AI Apocalypse?

#artificialintelligence

"Just to rub it in, a version of AlphaGO, called AlphaZero recently learned to trounce AlphaGo at Go, and also to trounce Stockfish (the world's best chess program, far better than any human) and Elmo (the world's best shongi program, also better than any human). AlphaZero did all this in one day." I was reading "Human Compatible" this week and the above anecdote got me thinking. A computer crushing Chess and Go Grandmasters is impressive and feels ominous, but what does it mean for our everyday jobs? Every year computer chips get smaller and faster (Moore's Law) and experts predict Machine Learning, AI and automation will eviscerate our jobs.


Artificial Intelligence And The End Of Work

#artificialintelligence

Dating back to the Industrial Revolution, people have speculated that machines would render human ... [ ] work obsolete. Unlike in earlier eras, artificial intelligence will prove this prophecy true. "When looms weave by themselves, man's slavery will end." Stanford is hosting an event next month named "Intelligence Augmentation: AI Empowering People to Solve Global Challenges." This title is telling and typical.


25 Years Ago, Chess Changed Forever When Deep Blue Beat Garry Kasparov

Slate

Chess has captured the imagination of humans for centuries due to its strategic beauty--an objective, board-based testament to the power of mortal intuition. Twenty-five years ago Wednesday, though, human superiority on a chessboard was seriously threatened for the first time. At a nondescript convention center in Philadelphia, a meticulously constructed supercomputer called Deep Blue faced off against Garry Kasparov for the first in a series of six games. Kasparov was world chess champion at the time and widely considered to be one of the greatest players in the history of chess. He did not expect to lose.


Researchers built an AI that plays chess like a person, not a super computer

Engadget

We mere mortals haven't truly been competitive against artificial intelligence in chess in a long time. It's been 15 years since a human has conquered a computer in a chess tournament. However, a team of researchers have developed an AI chess engine that doesn't set out to crush us puny humans -- it tries to play like us. The Maia engine doesn't necessarily play the best available move. Instead, it tries to replicate what a human would do.


Artificial intelligence and machine learning: A new blueprint for the fintech industry

#artificialintelligence

The term Artificial Intelligence was coined 70 years ago as the stuff of fantasy fiction and about 50 years post that nothing much moved. Then, in 1997 like a bolt from the blue, IBM's Deep Blue defeated world chess champion Garry Kasparov 4-2 in a six game series. Since then, machines have beaten humans at far more complex games – Go, Poker, Dota 2. Computing power grew over a trillion times in the last 50 years. Can you name any industry/trend that has evolved by this order of magnitude? The computer that helped navigate Apollo 11's moon landing had the power of two Nintendo consoles. You have a lot more power in your smartphone today.


Artificial intelligence and machine learning: A new blueprint for the fintech industry

#artificialintelligence

The term Artificial Intelligence was coined 70 years ago as the stuff of fantasy fiction and about 50 years post that nothing much moved. Then, in 1997 like a bolt from the blue, IBM's Deep Blue defeated world chess champion Garry Kasparov 4-2 in a six game series. Since then, machines have beaten humans at far more complex games – Go, Poker, Dota 2. Computing power grew over a trillion times in the last 50 years. Can you name any industry/trend that has evolved by this order of magnitude? The computer that helped navigate Apollo 11's moon landing had the power of two Nintendo consoles. You have a lot more power in your smartphone today.


Are Computers That Win at Chess Smarter Than Geniuses?

#artificialintelligence

But then there was the Chinese game of go (pictured), estimated to be 4000 years old, which offers more "degrees of freedom" (possible moves, strategy, and rules) than chess (2 10170). As futurist George Gilder tells us, in Gaming AI, it was a rite of passage for aspiring intellects in Asia: "Go began as a rigorous rite of passage for Chinese gentlemen and diplomats, testing their intellectual skills and strategic prowess. Later, crossing the Sea of Japan, Go enthralled the Shogunate, which brought it into the Japanese Imperial Court and made it a national cult." Then AlphaGo, from Google's DeepMind, appeared on the scene in 2016: As the Chinese American titan Kai-Fu Lee explains in his bestseller AI Super-powers,8 the riveting encounter between man and machine across the Go board had a powerful effect on Asian youth. Though mostly unnoticed in the United States, AlphaGo's 2016 defeat of Lee Sedol was avidly watched by 280 million Chinese, and Sedol's loss was a shattering experience. The Chinese saw DeepMind as an alien system defeating an Asian man in the epitome of an Asian game.


If a robot is conscious, is it OK to turn it off? The moral implications of building true AIs

#artificialintelligence

In the "Star Trek: The Next Generation" episode "The Measure of a Man," Data, an android crew member of the Enterprise, is to be dismantled for research purposes unless Captain Picard can argue that Data deserves the same rights as a human being. Naturally the question arises: What is the basis upon which something has rights? What gives an entity moral standing? The philosopher Peter Singer argues that creatures that can feel pain or suffer have a claim to moral standing. He argues that nonhuman animals have moral standing, since they can feel pain and suffer.


Pitting Computers Against Each Other . . . in Chess

Communications of the ACM

For those of us involved in programming computers to play chess, it has been a great adventure. ACM annual tournaments began in 1970 (50 years ago!) and were hosted year after year for a quarter-century by the organization. They were terrific catalysts for progress in the field, and deserve major credit for the eventual 1997 defeat of then-World Champion Garry Kasparov. I feel human intelligence has been vastly overrated. We humans haven't learned how not to fight wars over various explanations of how the universe or man came into being.