Creativity & Intelligence


DeepMind have created an IQ test for AI, and it didn't do too well

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Finally, they tested the systems. In some cases, they used test problems with the same abstract factors as the training set -- like both training and testing the AI on problems that required it to consider the number of shapes in each image. In other cases, they used test problems incorporating different abstract factors than those in the training set. For example, they might train the AI on problems that required it to consider the number of shapes in each image, but then test it on ones that required it to consider the shapes' positions to figure out the right answer.


Will Artificial Intelligence override human intelligence and experiences?

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The future is in algorithms. Physical tasks that required effort were automated, which freed up human capital to explore new knowledge. Automation, however, never threatened human existence as much as...


Google's DeepMind AI is now training machines using IQ tests to improve abstract thought

Daily Mail

AI has moved a step closer to achieving human-like thought, after a new project developed machines capable of abstract thought to pass parts of an IQ test. Experts from DeepMind, which is owned by Google parent company Alphabet, put machine learning systems through their paces with IQ tests, which are designed to measure a number of reasoning skills. The puzzles in the test involve a series of seemingly random shapes, which participants need to study to determine the rules of that dictate the pattern. Once they have worked out the rules of the puzzle, they should be able to accurately pick the next shape in the sequence. DeepMind researchers hope that developing AI which is capable of thinking outside the box could lead to machines dreaming-up novel solutions to problems that humans may not ever have considered.


DeepMind AI takes IQ tests to probe its ability for abstract thought

New Scientist

Will artificial intelligences ever be able to match humans in abstract thought, or are they just very fancy number crunchers? Researchers at Google DeepMind are trying to find out by challenging AIs to solve abstract reasoning puzzles similar to those found in IQ tests.


Could you pass this IQ test designed to identify geniuses in the 99th Percentile?

Daily Mail

You may think you've got a good grasp of general knowledge, but this fiendishly difficult quiz might just prove you wrong. Putting the nation's intellect to the test, this tricky Playbuzz quiz challenges the internet to see if any of us have an intellect in the 99th percentile. So, how many can you get right? The comments below have not been moderated. The views expressed in the contents above are those of our users and do not necessarily reflect the views of MailOnline.


'Space kingdom' Asgardia wants IQ tests for wannabe citizens

The Independent

Future citizens of a newly-formed "space kingdom" may need to pass an IQ test to be a part of the self-proclaimed utopian society. At a ceremony in Vienna's Hofburg Palace on Monday, 25 June, hundreds of people gathered for the inauguration of Asgardia – a "global humanitarian project" which hopes to one day set up human colonies on the Moon. Asgardia's first ruler is a Russian billionaire, Igor Ashurbeyli, a computer scientist who has spear-headed the new nation since it was first announced in October 2016. Nasa's canny decision to commission sumptuous vintage-inspired posters by Seattle design firm Invisible Creature has firmly placed space travel back where it belongs: in the imagination of travellers "We were ecstatic, just because our grandfather was an illustrator at Nasa for 30 years," says Clark The artwork harks back to the Jet Age-era posters commissioned by Howard Hughes' Trans World Airlines and its rival United in the 1950s and 1960s, when the work of David Klein (for TWA) and Stan Galli (for United) glamorised and essentially branded this new age of air travel It doesn't matter that Nasa has no plans for a "Grand Tour" of Jupiter, Saturn, Neptune and Uranus Nasa's canny decision to commission sumptuous vintage-inspired posters by Seattle design firm Invisible Creature has firmly placed space travel back where it belongs: in the imagination of travellers "We were ecstatic, just because our grandfather was an illustrator at Nasa for 30 years," says Clark The artwork harks back to the Jet Age-era posters commissioned by Howard Hughes' Trans World Airlines and its rival United in the 1950s and 1960s, when the work of David Klein (for TWA) and Stan Galli (for United) glamorised and essentially branded this new age of air travel It doesn't matter that Nasa has no plans for a "Grand Tour" of Jupiter, Saturn, Neptune and Uranus During his inauguration speech, Mr Ashurbeyli stressed his belief in the significance of his leadership. "This day will certainly be recorded in the annals of the greatest events in the history of humankind," he said.


Artificial Intelligence vs Human Intelligence - 5 Useful Comparison

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Intelligence can be defined as a general mental ability for reasoning, problem-solving, and learning. On the basis of this definition, intelligence can be reliably measured by standardized tests with obtained scores predicting several broad social outcomes such as educational achievement, job performance, health, and longevity. So let's study the differences between Artificial Intelligence and Human Intelligence in a detail. Artificial Intelligence is the study and design of Intelligent agent, These intelligent agents have the ability to analyze the environments and produce actions which maximize success. AI research uses tools and insights from many fields, including computer science, psychology, philosophy, neuroscience, cognitive science, linguistics, operations research, economics, control theory, probability, optimization and logic.AI research also overlaps with tasks such as robotics, control systems, scheduling, data mining, logistics, speech recognition, facial recognition and many others.


AI matching human intelligence still decades away: CA research scientists

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Artificial Intelligence (AI) is still decades away in matching human intelligence, despite major advances, according to scientists at CA technologies who are involved in cutting-edge research. "On true general intelligence there has been a lot of work, but the whole scientific community agrees that it will take a very long term before we reach it. It will take decades," said Victor Muntes-Mulero, Vice President of Strategic Research at CA technologies, on the sidelines of the company's "Built to Change Summit" here. Muntes-Mulero, who is part of the Advance Deep Dive Research initiative of CA, said that there was "still a long path to get there", and in between there has to be a lots and lots of work done on various aspects of intelligence. Maria Valez-Rojas, Research Scientist with the Deep Dive Research, said that the safety issues coming up in robotics, and the need to solve all of them, mean that it's not going to happen in the near future.


The gene that led to the human intelligence boom has been found

New Scientist

How did humans get so smart? A random reshuffle in our ancestor's genome more than 3 million years ago let our brains grow three times as large. David Haussler at the University of California, Santa Cruz and his colleagues were comparing brain development in humans and monkeys when they found one key difference.


Human intelligence first evolved when our ancestors began co-operating to hunt for food and shelter

Daily Mail

Human intelligence may have first evolved to help us work together, according to a new study. Research suggests that our ape-like ancestors boosted their brain size when they began to co-operate to hunt for food and shelter. Scientists said that the expanding intelligence of our ancestors in turn helped them better co-operate and take down larger prey, such as mammoths, that they could share with a bigger group. Human intelligence may have first evolved to help us work together, according to a new study. Research suggests that our ape-like ancestors boosted their brain size when they began to co-operate to hunt for food and shelter.