Law


Can AI Be a Racist Too?

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This predisposition can make the AI show racism, sexism, or different kinds of discrimination. This is typically viewed as a political issue and disregarded by researchers. The outcome is that just non-technical people write on the point. These individuals frequently propose approach suggestions to build diversity among AI analysts. The irony is faltering: A black AI researcher can't assemble an AI any not quite the same as a white AI researcher.


Researchers find AI is bad at predicting GPA, grit, eviction, job training, layoffs, and material hardship

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A paper coauthored by over 112 researchers across 160 data and social science teams found that AI and statistical models, when used to predict six life outcomes for children, parents, and households, weren't very accurate even when trained on 13,000 data points from over 4,000 families. They assert that the work is a cautionary tale on the use of predictive modeling, especially in the criminal justice system and social support programs. "Here's a setting where we have hundreds of participants and a rich data set, and even the best AI results are still not accurate," said study co-lead author Matt Salganik, a professor of sociology at Princeton and interim director of the Center for Information Technology Policy at the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. "These results show us that machine learning isn't magic; there are clearly other factors at play when it comes to predicting the life course." The study, which was published this week in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, is the fruit of the Fragile Families Challenge, a multi-year collaboration that sought to recruit researchers to complete a predictive task by predicting the same outcomes using the same data.


The emergence of the professional AI risk manager

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When the 1970s and 1980s were colored by banking crises, regulators from around the world banded together to set international standards on how to manage financial risk. Those standards, now known as the Basel standards, define a common framework and taxonomy on how risk should be measured and managed. This led to the rise of professional financial risk managers, which was my first job. The largest professional risk associations, GARP and PRMIA, now have over 250,000 certified members combined, and there are many more professional risk managers out there who haven't gone through those particular certifications. We are now beset by data breaches and data privacy scandals, and regulators around the world have responded with data regulations.


Using AI responsibly to fight the coronavirus pandemic – TechCrunch

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The emergence of the novel coronavirus has left the world in turmoil. COVID-19, the disease caused by the virus, has reached virtually every corner of the world, with the number of cases exceeding a million and the number of deaths more than 50,000 worldwide. It is a situation that will affect us all in one way or another. With the imposition of lockdowns, limitations of movement, the closure of borders and other measures to contain the virus, the operating environment of law enforcement agencies and those security services tasked with protecting the public from harm has suddenly become ever more complex. They find themselves thrust into the middle of an unparalleled situation, playing a critical role in halting the spread of the virus and preserving public safety and social order in the process.


A shared vision to advance Human-Centered AI

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The session on Toward More General Artificial Intelligence was co-chaired by Asli Celikyilmaz and Chris Manning. We started with a shared reflection on where AI is today. For all of the excitement, AI researchers agree that solutions to date have been quite brittle and narrow in scope and capabilities. Presentations and discussions in this session covered key directions, opportunities, and research investments aimed at overcoming long-term challenges with achieving more general AI capabilities, including research that could enable AI systems to do more effective learning about the world in the wild from unsupervised data, methods for garnering and manipulating large amounts of commonsense knowledge, transferring learnings on one or more tasks to new tasks and new domains, and reasoning about causes and effects. The session on Human-AI Collaboration and Coordination was co-chaired by Ece Kamar and James Landay.


Using AI responsibly to fight the coronavirus pandemic – TechCrunch

#artificialintelligence

The emergence of the novel coronavirus has left the world in turmoil. COVID-19, the disease caused by the virus, has reached virtually every corner of the world, with the number of cases exceeding a million and the number of deaths more than 50,000 worldwide. It is a situation that will affect us all in one way or another. With the imposition of lockdowns, limitations of movement, the closure of borders and other measures to contain the virus, the operating environment of law enforcement agencies and those security services tasked with protecting the public from harm has suddenly become ever more complex. They find themselves thrust into the middle of an unparalleled situation, playing a critical role in halting the spread of the virus and preserving public safety and social order in the process.


Airlines take no chances with our safety. And neither should artificial intelligence

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You'd thinking flying in a plane would be more dangerous than driving a car. In reality it's much safer, partly because the aviation industry is heavily regulated. Airlines must stick to strict standards for safety, testing, training, policies and procedures, auditing and oversight. And when things do go wrong, we investigate and attempt to rectify the issue to improve safety in the future. Other industries where things can go very badly wrong, such as pharmaceuticals and medical devices, are also heavily regulated.


How AI uses document verification to keep people safe

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It's a moment most people have experienced. Their required to show their ID for something and then wait as the person studies both their face and the photo on the driver's license, passport, or other document, making sure the person is not an impersonator trying to pull a fast one. These days, artificial intelligence is playing a role similar to that security person, with software that allows validation of IDs remotely through digital document verification. This method allows doing business through a smartphone, and someone on the other end can make sure the person is who they say they are and that a thief hasn't stolen the identity. And that's especially important at a time when identity theft has been on the rise, says Stephen Hyduchak, CEO of Aver (www.goaver.com),


The race problem with AI: 'Machines are learning to be racist'

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Artificial intelligence (AI) is already deeply embedded in so many areas of our lives. Society's reliance on AI is set to increase at a pace that is hard to comprehend. AI isn't the kind of technology that is confined to futuristic science fiction movies – the robots you've seen on the big screen that learn how to think, feel, fall in love, and subsequently take over humanity. No, AI right now is much less dramatic and often much harder to identify. Artificial intelligence is simply machine learning.


AI in a Sextech: the Future of Sex

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A scientist and a researcher, Brian Roemelle, once said that artificial intelligence is the electricity of the future. And it is difficult to disagree, for AI has a huge impact on many industries right now -- from banking to auto. But have you ever thought how AI works for a sextech? Great changes are happening right now, and although you may not even notice it, your sex experience is getting better. The sex industry is booming -- people accept themselves and their bodies, some of them open out, some start experimenting, and some identify themselves as digisexuals (people whose primary sexual identity comes through the use of technology -- they don't need other people to have sex to).