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Artificial intelligence is going to supercharge surveillance

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We usually think of surveillance cameras as digital eyes, watching over us or watching out for us, depending on your view. But really, they're more like portholes: useful only when someone is looking through them. Sometimes that means a human watching live footage, usually from multiple video feeds. Most surveillance cameras are passive, however. They're there as a deterrence, or to provide evidence if something goes wrong. But this is changing -- and fast.


A "New Nobel" – Computer Scientist Wins $1 Million Artificial Intelligence Prize

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Duke professor becomes second recipient of AAAI Squirrel AI Award for pioneering socially responsible AI. Whether preventing explosions on electrical grids, spotting patterns among past crimes, or optimizing resources in the care of critically ill patients, Duke University computer scientist Cynthia Rudin wants artificial intelligence (AI) to show its work. Especially when it's making decisions that deeply affect people's lives. While many scholars in the developing field of machine learning were focused on improving algorithms, Rudin instead wanted to use AI's power to help society. She chose to pursue opportunities to apply machine learning techniques to important societal problems, and in the process, realized that AI's potential is best unlocked when humans can peer inside and understand what it is doing.


Shared Links (weekly)

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What Attorneys Should Know About Advanced AI in eDiscovery: A Brief Discussion Is Going to the Office a Broken Way of Working?- “In a knowledge-based economy, your value is the talent you employ. If other companies employ better talent, they are better than you.” Law Firms May Be Facing an eDiscovery and Tech Personnel Crisis How to Get Employees to (Actually) Participate in Well-Being Programs Mental Health And The Workplace Walking the “Tightrope” Between Privacy, Information Governance, Discovery, and Litigation by Leveraging Technology and Expertise Top Ten Impacts of Covid on Legal: Relativity Fest Panel Weighs In Legal Technology: Why the Legal Tech Boom is Just Getting Started Grossman & Cormack Say Stick to Science, Not the “eDiscovery Medicine Show


Kai-fu Lee: What's next for artificial intelligence?

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Some of the worst sectarian clashes since Lebanon's 15-year civil war (1975-1990) broke out in Beirut this week between supporters of Hezbollah and Amal, both Shiite political parties, and Christian, far-right Lebanese Forces. Shiite protesters were rallying against the state probe into the Beirut port blast, which occurred last year. They say authorities were singling out Shiite politicians for questioning and blame. In this video, watch Ian Bremmer's conversation with Lebanese journalist and author Kim Ghattas on GZW talking about the future of Lebanese politics and sectarianism in the county after the after the blast. It was originally published on August 19, 2020.


Could Artificial Intelligence Prevent Future Wars? - AI Summary

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A combination of situational complexity, intractable positions of opposing sides and escalating costs is driving the search for AI-based approaches that could replace humans in resolving legal cases, international disputes and military conflicts. Master of the Rolls and head of civil litigation in England and Wales, Sir Geoffrey Vos, has talked for some time about AI's potential to propose resolutions for humans to ratify. The goal of AI is to develop computer algorithms that replicate the way humans think when processing language, solving problems and analyzing large amounts of data to extract relevant information. The nation is reportedly investing over $400 billion to develop leadership in AI across all domains, and the legal sector is seen as an area where massive efficiencies and financial savings could be achieved by automating significant parts of the judicial process. The third suggested contribution of AI lies in "creating greater inclusivity of mediation processes" -- pulling in the views of a wider cross-section of the affected populations, geographic neighbors of the opposing factions and independent institutions that may have previously played peacekeeping and monitoring roles.


EU's AI law should serve as 'model across the globe'

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The European Union wants its Artificial Intelligence (AI) Act to be an example for the rest of the world to follow when regulating the emerging technology. EU Telecommunications ministers held their first debate on the proposed AI Act in Brussels on Thursday to decide the guidelines for the coming years, where Slovenia's Minister for Public Administration Boštjan Koritnik said the bloc's AI act should serve as a global model. "Ministers today voiced their clear support for one comprehensive law on artificial intelligence, which would serve as a model across the globe, in the same vein as the general data protection regulation, GDPR, in the area of protection of personal data," Koritnik said. "There is still substantial work ahead, as we want to make sure that the Artificial Intelligence Act will achieve its twin aims of ensuring safety and respect for fundamental rights and stimulating the development and uptake of AI-based technology in all sectors. The Slovenian [European Council] presidency will continue the intense work on this proposal, which it considers a top priority in the digital area."


The Rapid Expansion of AI Surveillance: What You Need to Know

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AI surveillance is increasing at a rapid pace around the world. The East Asia/Pacific, Americas, and the Middle East/North Africa regions are robust adopters of these tools. Even liberal democracies in Europe have installed automated border controls, predictive policing, "safe cities", and facial recognition systems. China is the biggest supplier of these technologies which can be found in 63 countries. Huawei alone is responsible for providing AI surveillance technology to at least fifty countries and its leadership has strong ties with the Chinese government.


Criminals use fake AI voice to swindle UAE bank out of $35m

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In brief Authorities in the United Arab Emirates have requested the US Department of Justice's help in probing a case involving a bank manager who was swindled into transferring $35m to criminals by someone using a fake AI-generated voice. The employee received a call to move the company-owned funds by someone purporting to be a director from the business. He also previously saw emails that showed the company was planning to use the money for an acquisition, and had hired a lawyer to coordinate the process. When the sham director instructed him to transfer the money, he did so thinking it was a legitimate request. But it was all a scam, according to US court documents reported by Forbes.


Top Ten Issues on Liability and Regulation of Artificial Intelligence (AI) Systems

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Key Takeaways: - New Artificial Intelligence (AI) technology is being integrated into all industries. I have written a few articles regarding the liability of autonomous systems under the United Arab Emirates' (UAE) law, regarding the liability of autonomous systems under the UAE's Civil Code, available remedies, comparing to other regimes, and recommendations for law, policy and ethics. I focused mainly on the liability and regulation of autonomous or Artificial Intelligence (AI) systems under the laws of the UAE, but I also compared the UAE's legal system to other regimes, including the United Kingdom (UK) and the European Union (EU). I concluded that generally speaking, when it comes to AI, the issues are similar across the globe. In the near future, every single one of us will be dealing in some shape or form with an autonomous system or an AI-powered system.


The nanomafia: nanotechnology's global network of organized crime

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The nanotechnology has become a billionaire industry with multiple potential applications on human beings; however, experimentation in humans is high risk, for that reason, the transnational nanotechnology companies would be resorting to criminal methods like the organized crime to achieve that purpose. Thus, mafias of nanotechnology, “nanomafias”, would being created, mainly in Latin America, which would be multiplying vertiginously due to several factors like the ignorance in society regarding the use of nanotechnology as criminal weapon, the “invisibility” of this mafia for being used as its tool, the wifi, its economic power, the extortion with the Brain net, the silence and participation of the press and the health unions, the media disinformation campaign, its world interconnection, being an organized crime and the possible participation of authorities of the national police, theprosecutor's office and the judiciary, and the intelligence services. Nanomafia aims to become the greatest organized crime network in the world, therefore, the world society shallknow, be alert and report the crimes committed by this nanomafia.