shelter


Can We Revive Empathy in Our Selfish World? - Issue 72: Quandary

Nautilus

You wake up on a bus, surrounded by all your remaining possessions. A few fellow passengers slump on pale blue seats around you, their heads resting against the windows. You turn and see a father holding his son. But one man, with a salt-and-pepper beard and khaki vest, stands near the back of the bus, staring at you. You feel uneasy and glance at the driver, wondering if he would help you if you needed it. When you turn back around, the bearded man has moved toward you and is now just a few feet away.


Dog reunited with owner after 8 month, 175-mile journey

FOX News

SOUTH PARIS, Maine – A dog that went missing in Massachusetts months ago has been reunited with its family after being found in Maine, 175 miles (282 kilometers) away. The Bangor Daily News reports 5-year-old king shepherd Kaiser made his way from Ashby, Massachusetts, to South Paris, Maine, over a span of eight months. The pooch jumped a wall at the home of a woman who was caring for him before going missing. Kaiser's owner, Tom Wollcott, and his children were reunited with the dog Sunday morning. Wollcott conducted an exhaustive search, including using a drone to try to find Kaiser.


Baidu builds smart shelter for stray cats that uses AI to tell difference between felines and dogs

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Chinese tech giant Baidu has created a high-tech home for stray cats. Its'Smart Cattery' uses artificial intelligence to distinguish cats from other animals and even spot common diseases. The shelters could prove to be a safe haven for many felines subjected to harsh conditions outdoors in the wintertime. Chinese tech giant Baidu has created a high-tech home for stray cats. Its'Smart Cattery' uses artificial intelligence to distinguish cats from other animals and even spot common diseases A cat walks up to the shelter where a facial recognition camera scans its face.


Smart cat shelter uses AI to let strays inside — but no dogs allowed

Mashable

You might know Baidu for its search engine, but it's looking to make a mark in the feline world too. The Chinese internet giant has released what it's claimed to be the first AI-powered smart cat shelter, which was put together by one of the company's engineers, Wan Xi. "At first, I just wanted to provide them with a warm place in winter with food and water that is not frozen," Wan told state media. As detailed in Baidu's blog post, what's novel about this use of AI is the camera at the front of the shelter's door. For stray cats, winter is almost fatal. Using #AI and Baidu's #EasyDL platform, a Baidu engineer has devised an AI Smart Cattery to shelter stray cats and help them survive Beijing's cold winter.


How AI is powering a new wave of activism

#artificialintelligence

Paul Duan was working as a data scientist at Eventbrite in San Francisco by day, and volunteering at homeless shelters and soup kitchens by night. He realized one day that he wanted to use AI to help unemployed people find jobs--a core mission of his Paris, France-based nonprofit Bayes Impact. Bayes Impact uses data to build social services fit for a better future. "When you work at a soup kitchen, you serve a soup one by one to each individual, and it feels great," says Duan, "But then it gets really sad because you see that there are 50 people in line behind the person, and you know that behind the closed door of the shelter you have 10,000 more on the streets. So the one question that came to mind was, 'how can we impact people at the biggest scale?'"


Shelters often mislabel dog breeds. But should we be labeling them at all?

Popular Science

Pit bulls get a bad rap, which is especially vexing given that no one actually knows exactly what a pit bull is. There's no unified definition, because "pit bull" is not a recognized breed. But the label can have devastating consequences for dogs in shelters, who are perceived as less adoptable because of their purported heritage. In recent years, especially with the advent of genetic testing, some researchers have a new idea: just stop labelling mixed-breed dogs altogether. Researchers at Arizona State University decided to do a large-scale analysis of shelter dogs by looking at every pup that came through the doors of two animal shelters, one in Phoenix, AZ and one in San Diego, CA.


No, Robots will Not Take Over and Rule the Planet … and this is why.

#artificialintelligence

One of Hollywood's oldest tropes is the robotic usurpation of humankind. It makes for compelling thrillers and science fiction. The variety of narrative twists possible are in-numerable. Terminator, a luminary of the genre, implanted this fear as efficiently as Jaws did in cultivating a phobia of sharks into an entire generation. As narratives go, everything else pales in comparison -- a cautionary tale regarding one's lust for power which inevitably capsizes when it surmounts its peak.


Human intelligence first evolved when our ancestors began co-operating to hunt for food and shelter

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Human intelligence may have first evolved to help us work together, according to a new study. Research suggests that our ape-like ancestors boosted their brain size when they began to co-operate to hunt for food and shelter. Scientists said that the expanding intelligence of our ancestors in turn helped them better co-operate and take down larger prey, such as mammoths, that they could share with a bigger group. Human intelligence may have first evolved to help us work together, according to a new study. Research suggests that our ape-like ancestors boosted their brain size when they began to co-operate to hunt for food and shelter.


Here's what we know about the robots that might build our first homes on the Moon

#artificialintelligence

This time, though, they'll have one noble mission: to build shelter the first human colonizers will inhabit. A team of Japanese scientists is working to make this a reality. They started a company called ispace with the intention of launching a private space mission to the Moon. And they want to get started on it soon: the team is planning its first mission for late 2019, and a second in 2020. The Moon is smaller than our other planetary neighbors, but it could become a second home for an exponentially growing human population back on Earth.