reef


Latest Generation of Lionfish-Hunting Robot Can Find and Zap More Fish Than Ever

IEEE Spectrum Robotics Channel

It's always cool to see lionfish while snorkeling or scuba diving. They're spectacular-looking, and because they're covered in flamboyant spines, they're usually secure enough in their invincibility that they'll mostly just sit there and let you get close to them. Lionfish don't make for very good oceanic neighbors, though, and in places where they're an invasive species and have few native predators (like most of the Atlantic coast of the United States), they do their best to eat anything that moves while breeding almost continuously. A single lionfish per reef reduced young juvenile fish populations by 79 percent in only a five-week period. Many species were affected, including cardinalfish, parrotfish, damselfish, and others.


Robot makes world-first baby coral delivery to Great Barrier Reef

Robohub

In a world first, an undersea robot has dispersed microscopic baby corals (coral larvae) to help scientists working to repopulate parts of the Great Barrier Reef during this year's mass coral spawning event. Professor Dunbabin engineered QUT's reef protector RangerBot into LarvalBot specifically for the coral restoration project led by Professor Harrison. The project builds on Professor Harrison's successful larval reseeding technique piloted on the southern Great Barrier Reef in 2016 and 2017 in collaboration with the Great Barrier Reef Foundation, the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA) and Queensland Parks & Wildlife Service (QPWS), following successful small scale trials in the Philippines funded by the Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research. "This year represents a big step up for our larval restoration research and the first time we've been able to capture coral spawn on a bigger scale using large floating spawn catchers then rearing them into tiny coral larvae in our specially constructed larval pools and settling them on damaged reef areas," Professor Harrison said. "Winning the GBRF's Reef Innovation Challenge meant that we could increase the scale of the work planned for this year using mega-sized spawn catchers and fast track an initial trial of LarvalBot as a novel method of dispersing the coral larvae out on to the Reef. "With further research and refinement, this technique has enormous potential to operate across large areas of reef and multiple sites in a way that hasn't previously been possible.


AI could provide solutions for climate change – Hacker Noon

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It takes approximately 40 minutes for 82,944 processors on the world's fastest computer to compute what one percent of our brain calculates in a second. Despite this lag, AI has more promising solutions than humans when it comes to addressing the issue of climate change. Climate change is a serious issue that needs immediate attention across the globe. Compelling pieces of evidence that point towards a bleak future include a rise in global temperatures, extreme events, shrinking of the ice sheet, warming oceans, sea level rise, and ocean acidification. There are several good reasons for us to believe that the fourth industrial revolution powered by AI is a perfect opportunity for researchers to embrace AI as a transformative tool to address this grave issue.


Australia unleashes starfish-killing robot to protect Great Barrier Reef

The Japan Times

SYDNEY – A robot submarine able to hunt and kill the predatory crown-of-thorns starfish that are devastating the Great Barrier Reef was unveiled by Australian researchers on Friday. Scientists at Queensland University of Technology (QUT) said the robot, named the RangerBot and developed with a grant from Google, would serve as a "robo reef protector" for the vast World Heritage site off Australia's northeastern coast. The RangerBot has an eight-hour battery life and computer vision capabilities allowing it to monitor and map reef areas at scales not previously possible. "RangerBot is the world's first underwater robotic system designed specifically for coral reef environments, using only robot-vision for real-time navigation, obstacle avoidance and complex science missions," said Matthew Dunbabin, the QUT professor who unveiled the submarine. "This multifunction ocean drone can monitor a wide range of issues facing coral reefs including coral bleaching, water quality, pest species, pollution and siltation."


Engineers Are Making Squishy, Bio-Inspired Robots, Here's How They Work

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Scientists are looking to nature to inspire the next generation of robots. Here's what they've come up with. Could the Biggest Ocean Recording Ever Made Redefine Marine Science? The Swim - https://youtu.be/-GWVmk-U-kk Read More: Soft Robotics: Challenges and Perspectives https://www.sciencedirect.com/science... "There has been an increasing interest in the use of unconventional materials and morphologies in robotic systems because the underlying mechanical properties (such as body shapes, elasticity, viscosity, softness, density and stickiness) are crucial research topics for our in-depth understanding of embodied intelligence." Soft robotic fish swims alongside real ones in coral reefs http://news.mit.edu/2018/soft-robotic... "During test dives in the Rainbow Reef in Fiji, SoFi swam at depths of more than 50 feet for up to 40 minutes at once, nimbly handling currents and taking high-resolution photos and videos using (what else?) a fisheye lens."


Researchers Hope Artificial Intelligence Can Save Our World's Dying Reefs

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The alleged effects of climate change are reportedly responsible for coral reef bleaching, which is having catastrophic impacts on local marine species. Hoping to reverse this supposed trend, a new method of artificial intelligence (AI) cataloguing designed to identify the geographic regions where coral still thrives, aims to save some of the world's densest and varies aquatic ecosystems. Between ethical and economic concerns, there are plenty of reasons why saving our world's coral reef systems are in our best interest. Aside from providing habitat to a quarter of marine species, reefs generate $375 billion (USD) in revenue to the world economy, along with food security to over 500 million people. Without our ocean's reefs, researchers believe countless species and an entire ocean fishing industry would cease to exist.


Can Artificial Intelligence and 360-Degree Cameras Save Coral Reefs?

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Climate change has been bleaching coral reefs, decimating the local marine species that call them home, since at least the first major observations were recorded in the Caribbean in 1980. Thankfully, new A.I. cataloguing designed to identify the geographic regions where coral is still thriving hopes to reverse the trend, saving some of the world's most dense and varied aquatic ecosystems from all-but-certain extinction. There are numerous reasons why we need to care about saving coral reefs, from the ethical to the economic. In addition to housing about a quarter of marine species, these reefs provide $375 billion USD in revenue to the world economy, according to the Guardian, and food security to half a billion people. Without them, researchers say countless species and the entire ocean fishing industry that depends on them would simply evaporate.


AI analysis uncovers coral reefs resistant to climate change

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Global warming is destroying Earth's coral reefs -- the colorful underwater ecosystems simply can't survive as the ocean warms and acidifies. However, researchers have now discovered a type of coral off the coast of Indonesia's Sulawesi Island that seems to be resistant to global warming. The discovery could help us ensure at least some of the world's coral reefs survive climate change. As part of 50 Reefs, an initiative designed to identify climate change-resistant corals, researchers spent six weeks in June and July using underwater scooters equipped with 360-degree cameras to take more than 56,000 images of shallow water reefs. In total, they snapped images of 3,851 square kilometers (1,487 square miles) worth of reefs.


Can Artificial Intelligence and 360-Degree Cameras Save Coral Reefs?

#artificialintelligence

Climate change has been bleaching coral reefs, decimating the local marine species that call them home, since at least the first major observations were recorded in the Caribbean in 1980. Thankfully, new A.I. cataloguing designed to identify the geographic regions where coral is still thriving hopes to reverse the trend, saving some of the world's most dense and varied aquatic ecosystems from all-but-certain extinction. There are numerous reasons why we need to care about saving coral reefs, from the ethical to the economic. In addition to housing about a quarter of marine species, these reefs provide $375 billion USD in revenue to the world economy, according to the Guardian, and food security to half a billion people. Without them, researchers say countless species and the entire ocean fishing industry that depends on them would simply evaporate.


AI identifies heat-resistant coral reefs in Indonesia

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A recent scientific survey off the coast of Sulawesi Island in Indonesia suggests that some shallow water corals may be less vulnerable to global warming than previously thought. Between 2014 and 2017, the world's reefs endured the worst coral bleaching event in history, as the cyclical El Niño climate event combined with anthropogenic warming to cause unprecedented increases in water temperature. But the June survey, funded by Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen's family foundation, found the Sulawesi reefs were surprisingly healthy. In fact they were in better condition than when they were originally surveyed in 2014 - a surprise for British scientist Dr Emma Kennedy, who led the research team. "After several depressing years as a coral reef scientist, witnessing the worst-ever global coral bleaching event, it is unbelievably encouraging to experience reefs such as these," she said.