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YPO

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The potential value added of artificial intelligence (AI) to businesses is undisputed, yet research confirms that most companies still struggle to capitalize on the technology. In a recent panel hosted by YPO member and Managing Director of Techstars Vijay Tirathrai and Jean-Philippe Linteau, Consul General of Canada in Dubai and the Northern Emirates, industry leaders from Canada and the Middle East shared insights on how organizations can leverage AI while mitigating risks. According to the International Data Corporation's latest release, worldwide revenues for the AI market are forecast to grow 16.4% year-over-year, reaching USD554.3 billion by 2024. Along with the U.S. and China, Canada is positioned to gain the most from this growth. "Canada has a thriving AI ecosystem, with world-leading research centers that have evolved into major hubs of AI, including Canada's supercluster project in Montreal, Scale AI," says Linteau. "Canada is now home to more than 800 AI companies, including more than 45 global tech multinationals, more than 60 investment groups, and 40-plus accelerators and incubators that focus on AI."


Artificial Intelligence Used By Royal Navy For First Time At Sea - AI Summary

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A rtificial intelligence (AI) has been used by the Royal Navy at sea for the first time – testing against supersonic missile threats. The research is being led by Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (DSTL) scientists – with the AI being tested on destroyer HMS Dragon and frigate HMS Lancaster. The MoD said the AI improves the early detection of lethal threat, accelerates engagement timelines and provides Royal Navy Commanders with a rapid hazard assessment to select the optimum weapon or measure to counter and destroy the target. "The Royal Navy's use of AI for the first time at sea is an important development in ensuring readiness to tackle threats we may face. The Royal Navy's use of AI for the first time at sea is an important development in ensuring readiness to tackle threats we may face. A rtificial intelligence (AI) has been used by the Royal Navy at sea for the first time – testing against supersonic missile threats. The research is being led by Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (DSTL) scientists – with the AI being tested on destroyer HMS Dragon and frigate HMS Lancaster. The MoD said the AI improves the early detection of lethal threat, accelerates engagement timelines and provides Royal Navy Commanders with a rapid hazard assessment to select the optimum weapon or measure to counter and destroy the target. "The Royal Navy's use of AI for the first time at sea is an important development in ensuring readiness to tackle threats we may face.


Admiral: Artificial Intelligence Will Be A Wingman, Not a Lead - Seapower

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The Navy is very much on board for integrating artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning into its networks, but human decision makers must always be part of the decision process in warfighting, an admiral said. "From a warfighting perspective, artificial intelligence subsets would be enablers or augments to the human in the loop," said Rear Adm. Paul Spedero Jr., director, Fleet Integrated Readiness and Analysis, U.S. Fleet Forces Command, speaking April 8 during a Navy League webinar sponsored by Deloitte. "That has always been our approach. I don't see that changing. There are some things that can't be replaced; the experience of a seasoned warfighter in the field being able to assess things that a machine -- no matter how much we teach it -- may never be able to pick up on. There's always going to be a necessity for [experience-based decision making]. That necessity for war fighting will never go away -- to have a human in the loop. "AI will be our wingmen," he said. "It will not be the lead in a fight." Spedero said in the world of data analysis, his current focus, there "certainly is a place for AI, particularly machine learning, as we try to get to that predictive and prescriptive level of data analytics.


Marines Lack Trust in Artificial Intelligence

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Before the Marine Corps can fully utilize the power of AI technology and the efficiencies it brings, the service must overcome one major hurdle: trust. "We're going to have to trust artificial intelligence," he said during remarks at the National Defense Industrial Association's Expeditionary Warfare Conference in February. Whether it's "sensor-to-shooter or fuel to a frontline unit, we put humans in the loop at about 16 places because we don't trust it yet," he said. The best way to boost confidence in the technology is to have Marines train machines, he said. Gen. Eric Austin, director of the Marine Corps' Capabilities Development Directorate, said building that faith in artificial intelligence will unlock its potential.


JAIC Seeks Test and Evaluation Services for Artificial Intelligence

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The Joint Artificial Intelligence Center is looking for AI test and evaluation services to support the Defense Department and "the entire U.S. government," according to a new request for proposal posted Feb. 11. The JAIC, through Army Contracting Command-Rock Island, intends to award multiple blanket purchase agreements for AI testing and evaluation services. The contract has a ceiling of more than $249 million, according to a question and answer document posted along with the RFP. Offers on the solicitation are due March 5. Jane Pinelis, the JAIC's testing and evaluation chief, said the contract and another forthcoming multi-award contract for data readiness assessments will help connect DOD components to industry partners with readily available services facilitating AI adoption. Data readiness has been one of the biggest impediments thwarting fielding of AI in DOD, she said.


How to build trust with Trusts on artificial intelligence

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Dr Venkat Reddy, consultant neurodevelopmental paediatrician, senior clinical adviser and AI lead at Future Perfect, discusses how AI-enabled analysis of healthcare data can both help clinicians, and encourage patients to be more engaged in their own care. In general, and as a clinician myself, I believe there is a lack of trust between clinicians and the use of AI. Aside from the few clinicians with an interest in clinical informatics and digital health, views are still largely shaped by newspaper headlines about killer robots. Unfortunately, there has been concern over the use of algorithms due to recent events. Not to mention the negative press about the use, or misuse, of AI by social media giants to gather information and'snoop on people'.


USA tops AI readiness index – Government & civil service news

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The USA has been named as the country best prepared to realise the benefits of artificial intelligence (AI) technologies in public service delivery, topping the 2020 Government AI Readiness Index. Meanwhile Singapore, which led the 2019 list, has fallen to sixth place. The index – compiled by UK-based consultants Oxford Insights and Canada's International Development Research Centre (IDRC) – examines how well-placed nations are to take advantage of the benefits of AI in their internal operations and the delivery of public services. This year, 172 countries were reviewed. The ranking measures AI readiness across three criteria: government willingness to adopt AI, and the ability to adapt and innovate to do so; availability of AI expertise and tools from the technology sector; and capabilities in building AI tools, providing them with high-quality data, and building them into public services.


National ambitions = dodgy AI policy and deployment?

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An annual report by a consulting firm to world governments uncovers an interesting pattern when it comes to the responsible use of AI. According data developed by consultant Oxford Insights, with one debatable exception, none of the top 15 countries ranked for their responsible use of AI could reasonably be considered to have strategic ambitions to dominate globally or even their region. The report, which looked broadly at the AI readiness of world governments, created a sub-ranking focused on how responsible governments are being in four "dimensions" -- inclusivity, accountability, privacy and transparency. Rank was measured using nine indicators grouped under each dimension. Japan, which recently began debating an outward-facing military that operates independent of the United States, ranked No. 15.


United States Air Force RSO Selects C3.ai as Strategic AI Platform

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REDWOOD CITY, Calif., Sept. 2, 2020 – C3.ai, an enterprise artificial intelligence (AI) software provider for accelerating digital transformation, announced an agreement with the United States Air Force (USAF) Rapid Sustainment Office (RSO) to deliver and deploy the C3 AI Suite and C3.ai Readiness to support predictive analytics and maintenance across the Air Force enterprise. Predicting an aircraft weapon system's readiness and increasing fleet availability is essential to the U.S. military's operational success. RSO's Condition-Based Maintenance Plus (CBM) Program Office will use the C3 AI Suite and extend C3.ai Readiness to deploy an AI-based predictive maintenance application for the USAF to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of maintenance processes. The RSO will deploy this application to the HH-60 Pave Hawk aircraft weapon system and then assess further fielding to additional aircraft weapon systems. This initiative will also lay a foundation and framework for the enhancement of RSO's overall AI and machine learning capabilities. "C3.ai's proven technology has demonstrated success across multiple industries with its AI-based readiness application for predictive maintenance and logistics planning, making C3.ai an ideal partner to implement RSO's vision to increase mission readiness," said Nathan Parker‚ RSO Deputy Program Executive Officer.


How to Evaluate AI Readiness for Government?

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Artificial intelligence (AI) will disrupt an enormous breadth of business sectors and change companies, organizations and societies. Artificial intelligence is relied upon to bring significant positive effects, as well as the risks and potential traps. The European Union member states as of late signed a Declaration of cooperation on AI to ensure the EU's competitiveness in this field and manage potential challenges emerging from it. The European Commission is likewise boosting funding on the side of AI with the point of expanding in increasing overall investment in it to in any event 20 billion Euros by 2020. For nations, it is of foremost significance to be prepared to receive the benefits of AI.