qualifier


ARIAC Qualifier 3 is now open

Robohub

We are happy to announce that Qualifier 3 is now open for the Agile Robotics for Industrial Automation Competition (ARIAC)! ARIAC is a simulation-based competition is designed to promote agility in industrial robot systems by utilizing the latest advances in artificial intelligence and robot planning. The goal is to enable industrial robots on the shop floors to be more productive, more autonomous, and to require less time from shop floor workers. You can learn more about the competition here. The top performing teams will be invited to present at a workshop held during IROS 2017 in Vancouver.


Here's why artificial intelligence isn't out to get us

#artificialintelligence

This process runs large data sets through networks set up to mimic the human brain's neural network in order to teach computers to solve specific problems on their own, such as recognizing patterns or identifying a particular object in a photograph. Deep learning is clearly a valuable technology, but we have many other problems to solve in creating artificial intelligence, including reasoning (meaning a machine can understand and not just calculate that 2 2 4), and attaining background knowledge that machines can use to create context. "The one thing that I would say is that when they and Bill Gates--someone I respect enormously--talk about AI turning evil or potential cataclysmic consequences, they always insert a qualifier that says "eventually" or this "could" happen." The one thing that I would say is that when they and Bill Gates--someone I respect enormously--talk about AI turning evil or potential cataclysmic consequences, they always insert a qualifier that says "eventually" or this "could" happen.


Here's why artificial intelligence isn't out to get us

PBS NewsHour

AI has a long way to go before people can or should worry about turning the world over to machines. Elon Musk's new plan to go all-in on self-driving vehicles puts a lot of faith in the artificial intelligence needed to ensure his Teslas can read and react to different driving situations in real time. AI is doing some impressive things--last week, for example, makers of the AlphaGo computer program reported that their software has learned to navigate the intricate London subway system like a native. Even the White House has jumped on the bandwagon, releasing a report days ago to help prepare the U.S. for a future when machines can think like humans. But AI has a long way to go before people can or should worry about turning the world over to machines, says Oren Etzioni, a computer scientist who has spent the past few decades studying and trying to solve fundamental problems in AI.