Goto

Collaborating Authors

patent


Visualizing Companies with the Most Patents Granted in 2021

#artificialintelligence

Companies around the world invest billions in R&D to provide cutting-edge innovation to their products and services. In order to protect these investments, companies apply for patents. Therefore, the number of utility patents a company is granted can be considered a rough measure of its level of innovation. Every year, the Patent 300 List identifies America's most innovative companies within the intellectual property space by analyzing the patents granted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO). In 2021, the USPTO granted a total of 327,798 utility patents, down 7% from the previous year.


The scientist who co-created CRISPR isn't ruling out engineered babies someday

MIT Technology Review

JD: It doesn't really make sense to me, [but] I'm pleased that we have our 45 issued patents, our 40 pending patents, all in the US. And our 30 European patents are unaffected by the ruling. And honestly, look, I'm carrying on with my research. AR: I always thought the origin of the patent fight was not about money. My own reading of why it was so strongly fought was that it was not over commercial control but over credit--who did the science--and the truth.


The Corporation as an Inventive Artificial Intelligence

#artificialintelligence

Prof. Ryan Abbott has gathered an amazing group of scholars for his new book on AI and IP that is forthcoming later this year. In general, the various chapters focus on various aspects of machine-based AI. My contribution takes a different tack and instead consider idea that modern corporations and other non-human entities are also a form of artificial intelligence. But, unlike their computer-bound AI cousins, corporations have already been granted the legal fiction of personhood status and many accompanying civil rights.[1] An item still lacking from the corporate arsenal is inventorship rights. Yes, a corporation may own or license an invention and its resulting patents.


AI investments soared in 2021, but big problems remain

#artificialintelligence

The artificial intelligence rich definitely got richer in 2021, according to the 2022 Stanford AI Index report. Private venture investment in AI exploded to $93.5 billion in 2021, more than doubling the 2020 tally. Even as investment levels have ballooned, the number of companies getting that money has gone down. In 2019, venture capitalists funded 1,051 AI companies. In 2020, that number dropped to 762, then plunged again to 746 in 2021, even as the size of funding rounds skyrocketed for the lucky few: In 2020 there were just four funding rounds that exceeded $500 million, but in 2021, that number climbed to 15.


B.Tech student designs AI-powered smart traffic signal

#artificialintelligence

It is usually seen that the traffic on the side of the road where we are traveling is crowded and the opposite side is almost empty but the green signal is given for the same period for every direction without assigning any priority. Caught in one such occasion while traveling for a medical emergency, Deepraj Chowdhary, a B.Tech student from the International Institute of Information Technology-Naya Raipur hit upon an idea to use artificial intelligence to speed up traffic more smartly. Christened as Smart Traffic Signal Management System for Roadways, Chowdhary has used artificial intelligence in python programming language and written algorithms to give more green signals for the direction which has the highest density of vehicles. Currently, the waiting duration for vehicles at traffic signals is equally divided irrespective of the density though traffic police can adjust it manually. Moreover, almost all the major traffic signals are attached with cameras that send live feed to the control room.


Artificial intelligence innovation among private banking industry companies has dropped off in the last year

#artificialintelligence

Research and innovation in artificial intelligence, AI, in the private banking sector has declined in the last year. The most recent figures show that the number of AI related patent applications in the industry stood at 40 in the three months ending January – down from 651 over the same period in 2020. Figures for patent grants related to AI followed a similar pattern to filings – shrinking from 97 in the three months ending January 2020 to 17 in the same period in 2021. The figures are compiled by GlobalData, who track patent filings and grants from official offices around the world. Using textual analysis, as well as official patent classifications, these patents are grouped into key thematic areas, and linked to key companies across various industries.


Artificial Intelligence can now be an Inventor: Where to from Here?

#artificialintelligence

On 30 July 2021, the Federal Court of Australia decided that AI systems can be inventors. In a word-first determination of Thaler v Commissioner of Patents,{[2021] FCA 879, ('Thaler')}, the Honourable Justice Beach found that AI systems can be the inventors on a patent application under Australian patent law. The decision has been appealed to the Full Bench of the Federal Court, which may decide to overrule it. For now, however, the decision is binding in Australia. Read on to find out what a patent is and an overview of the decision.


Legal Challenge Over Decision That AI Machines Cannot Be Granted Patents - AI Summary

#artificialintelligence

Abbott approached Thaler about using the AI as the basis of the case and with a team of lawyers, all working pro bono, they filed patent applications in more than a dozen countries listing DABUS as the inventor of a beverage container it created. New Zealand's Assistant Commissioner of Patents rejected the initial application in January, ruling that the term "inventor" intrinsically refers to a natural person. Abbott said the test case was not about any sort of legal rights for machines, rather it was about trying to get a patent for "the inventive output from an AI" that lacks a traditional human inventor. Some firms were already using AI programmes to discover new drugs or to find ways to repurpose materials but the companies that many of the lawyers on the case represent wanted greater clarity on patent ownership before investing further, he said. The application was declined in Australia but later overturned by the Federal Court in 2021 which said the country's patent act had no specific provision excluding AI systems as inventors.


Machine learning innovation among tech industry companies has dropped off in the last year

#artificialintelligence

Research and innovation in machine learning in the technology and communications sector has declined in the last year, according to data from research and analytics firm GlobalData. The most recent figures show that the number of related patent applications in the industry stood at 1,245 in the three months ending December – down from 3,582 over the same period in 2020. Figures for patent grants related to followed a similar pattern to filings – shrinking from 1,255 in the three months ending December 2020 to 511 in the same period in 2021. The figures are compiled by GlobalData, who track patent filings and grants from official offices around the world. Using textual analysis, as well as official patent classifications, these patents are grouped into key thematic areas, and linked to key companies across various industries.


Legal challenge over decision that AI machines cannot be granted patents

#artificialintelligence

A legal challenge is being prepared to overturn the Intellectual Property Office's (IPONZ) decision not to recognise a machine as an inventor. It is being led by University of Surrey law professor Ryan Abbott, who has been testing patent law around the world, including New Zealand, to see if an invention created by an artificial intelligence (AI) programme could receive a patent. The test case centres around a "creativity machine" or AI inventor programme, known as DABUS, which was developed by US-based physicist Stephen Thaler. Abbott approached Thaler about using the AI as the basis of the case and with a team of lawyers, all working pro bono, they filed patent applications in more than a dozen countries listing DABUS as the inventor of a beverage container it created. New Zealand's Assistant Commissioner of Patents rejected the initial application in January, ruling that the term "inventor" intrinsically refers to a natural person.