oncology


Meet Five Synthetic Biology Companies Using AI To Engineer Biology

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TVs and radios blare that "artificial intelligence is coming," and it will take your job and beat you at chess. But AI is already here, and it can beat you -- and the world's best -- at chess. In 2012, it was also used by Google to identify cats in YouTube videos. Today, it's the reason Teslas have Autopilot and Netflix and Spotify seem to "read your mind." Now, AI is changing the field of synthetic biology and how we engineer biology.


"Challenges and Opportunities for Machine Learning in Cancer Immunotherapy"

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Presented by Jennifer Chayes, Managing Director, Microsoft New England Research and New York City Talk Description: Cancer immunotherapy is one of the most exciting developments in healthcare. By enlisting our own immune systems to go after cancer, immunotherapy is much more focused than other cancer therapies – when effective, it kills the cancer cells without the damage of chemo or radiation. Cancer immunotherapy is now a first line treatment for stage four melanoma and lung cancer, leading to long-term survival in many patients. On the other hand, existing cancer immunotherapies only work for a relatively small subset of cancer patients. How do we properly identify the patients for whom existing immunotherapies are likely to be effective, and not have serious side effects, and how do we develop new cancer immunotherapies for other patients?


Meet Five Synthetic Biology Companies Using AI To Engineer Biology

#artificialintelligence

AI is changing the field of synthetic biology and how we engineer biology. It's helping engineers design new ways to design genetic circuits -- and it could leave a remarkable impact on the future of humanity TVs and radios blare that "artificial intelligence is coming," and it will take your job and beat you at chess. But AI is already here, and it can beat you -- and the world's best -- at chess. In 2012, it was also used by Google to identify cats in YouTube videos. Today, it's the reason Teslas have Autopilot and Netflix and Spotify seem to "read your mind."


PRESS RELEASE, September 16, 2019 - Auransa

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PALO ALTO, CA – September 16, 2019 – Auransa Inc., an artificial intelligence (AI)-driven biotechnology company developing precision medicines in areas of significant unmet medical need, today announced that data on AU-409, the company's lead drug candidate being developed for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), will be presented at the 13th Annual Conference of the International Liver Cancer Association (ILCA). The study results will be featured in an oral presentation at the conference, which is being held September 20-22, 2019, in Chicago, IL. AU-409 is Auransa's lead drug candidate and was generated leveraging the company's proprietary AI-driven SMarTR Engine. The SMarTR Engine tackles disease heterogeneity and leverages gene expression profiles to predict responder patient populations, as well as compounds that might be effective against those patient populations. Auransa designed AU-409 to combine three essential features: DNA binding activity, antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo, and good oral bioavailability.


Meet Five Synthetic Biology Companies Using AI To Engineer Biology

#artificialintelligence

AI is changing the field of synthetic biology and how we engineer biology. It's helping engineers design new ways to design genetic circuits -- and it could leave a remarkable impact on the future of humanity TVs and radios blare that "artificial intelligence is coming", and it will take your job and beat you at chess. But AI is already here, and it can beat you -- and the world's best -- at chess. In 2012, it was also used by Google to identify cats in YouTube videos. Today, it's the reason Teslas have Autopilot and Netflix and Spotify seem to "read your mind."


Automating artificial intelligence for medical decision-making

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MIT CSAIL researchers are hoping to accelerate the use of artificial intelligence to improve medical decision-making, by automating a key step that's usually done by hand -- and that's becoming more laborious as certain datasets grow ever-larger. The field of predictive analytics holds increasing promise for helping clinicians diagnose and treat patients. Machine-learning models can be trained to find patterns in patient data to aid in sepsis care, design safer chemotherapy regimens, and predict a patient's risk of having breast cancer or dying in the ICU, to name just a few examples. Typically, training datasets consist of many sick and healthy subjects, but with relatively little data for each subject. Experts must then find just those aspects -- or "features" -- in the datasets that will be important for making predictions.


Machine Learning Improves the Diagnosis of Patients with Head and Neck Cancers

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Every year, more than 17,000 people in Germany are diagnosed with head and neck cancers. These include cancers of the oral cavity, larynx and nose, but can also affect other areas of the head and neck. Some head and neck cancer patients will also develop lung cancer. "In the large majority of cases, it is impossible to determine whether these represent pulmonary metastases of the patient's head and neck cancer or a second primary cancer, i.e. primary lung cancer," explains Prof. Dr. Frederick Klauschen of Charité's Institute of Pathology, who co-led the study alongside Prof. Dr. David Capper of Charité's Department of Neuropathology. "This distinction is hugely important in the treatment of people affected by these cancers," emphasizes Prof. Klauschen, adding: "While surgery may provide a cure in patients with localized lung cancers, patients with metastatic head and neck cancers fare significantly worse in terms of survival and will require treatments such as chemoradiotherapy."


Cancer treatment enters a new era with artificial intelligence

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Colorectal cancer is the third-most common cancer worldwide, and it spreads to the liver in about half the patients. Kazemier, who specializes in liver surgery, says the best way to treat this type of cancer is to remove it. But some tumors are too large to be removed, and these patients must undergo systemic therapy, such as chemotherapy to shrink the tumors. After a period of treatment, tumors are manually evaluated using computerized tomography (CT) scans. At that time, medical professionals can see if a tumor shrunk or changed in appearance.


Seedo: The Self-Contained Weed Growing Robot

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Powered by AI and Machine Learning technology, Seedo enables anyone to grow anything with no experience and the same amount of space you would need for a mini-fridge. Founded in 2015, the Israeli AgriTech firm's self-contained device generates "high yields of lab-grade, pesticide-free herbs, and vegetables," states Seedo's website. But the company is well aware that the herb that little Seedo will most be responsible for growing, is cannabis. In fact, the device's impressive growing abilities have been translated from the knowledge of the company's founder, retired expert cannabis grower Yaakov Hai. Seedo's biggest market is in the United States where growing and using cannabis recreationally is now legal in 11 states in the USA and in 22 states medical cannabis has been recognised as an effective treatment for numerous health conditions including PTSD, depression, chronic pain and for those undergoing cancer treatment.


Machine learning improves the diagnosis of patients with head and neck cancers

#artificialintelligence

Every year, more than 17,000 people in Germany are diagnosed with head and neck cancers. These include cancers of the oral cavity, larynx and nose, but can also affect other areas of the head and neck. Some head and neck cancer patients will also develop lung cancer. "In the large majority of cases, it is impossible to determine whether these represent pulmonary metastases of the patient's head and neck cancer or a second primary cancer, i.e. primary lung cancer," explains Prof. Dr. Frederick Klauschen of Charité's Institute of Pathology, who co-led the study alongside Prof. Dr. David Capper of Charité's Department of Neuropathology. "This distinction is hugely important in the treatment of people affected by these cancers," emphasizes Prof. Klauschen, adding: "While surgery may provide a cure in patients with localized lung cancers, patients with metastatic head and neck cancers fare significantly worse in terms of survival and will require treatments such as chemoradiotherapy."