nurse


Grandma's Robot: How AI Is Revolutionizing Elder Care

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By 2050 almost one-in-four humans will be aged 60 years and older, double today's share. Moreover, the number of people aged 80 years and older will quadruple. This demographic shift is opening new vistas for AI technologies in elders' daily healthcare management, and as a useful tool for healthcare professionals and institutions treating seniors. The AI in elder care market is expected to exceed US$5.5 billion by 2022, and will grow into one of AI's most important support roles in societies of the future. For the elderly, taking duplicate or unnecessary medications or forgetting to take their medications altogether can greatly increase the risk of adverse reactions.


Artificial Intelligence Isn't Ready to Take Over From Doctors and Nurses, Just Yet

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In June 2018, Babylon Health hosted an event in London at which it showed off its latest digital healthcare development. It had developed artificial intelligence (AI) that it claimed was "better than a doctor". Considered a world-first, the AI proved it was on par with practising clinicians by taking tests, including a set of questions from the MRCGP exam – a test that has to be taken by every GP in the UK. Scoring higher than the average score over a period of five years, the AI achieved 81% during its first sitting. The industry and media alike were abuzz with excitement.


Chinese pre-schools use robots to do daily health checks of children

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The school nurse of the future could be a robot if Chinese technology catches on – but British people may be too suspicious, experts say. Children at more than 2,000 pre-schools in the Asian country now have their health checked every morning by a machine. The Walklake robot, which has a square body and cartoon-like face, takes just three seconds to scan a child's hands, eyes, and throats. And if it picks up any signs of illness – red eyes, rashes or mouth ulcers, for example – it can refer the child to a human nurse. One British doctor said he thought parents in the UK wouldn't want the technology and it could disrupt children's learning, but another called it'a great idea'.


Chinese pre-schools use robots to do daily health checks of children

#artificialintelligence

The school nurse of the future could be a robot if Chinese technology catches on – but British people may be too suspicious, experts say. Children at more than 2,000 pre-schools in the Asian country now have their health checked every morning by a machine. The Walklake robot, which has a square body and cartoon-like face, takes just three seconds to scan a child's hands, eyes, and throats. And if it picks up any signs of illness – red eyes, rashes or mouth ulcers, for example – it can refer the child to a human nurse. One British doctor said he thought parents in the UK wouldn't want the technology and it could disrupt children's learning, but another called it'a great idea'.


A new study shows what it might take to make AI useful in health care

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Hospital intensive care units can be frightening places for patients. In the US, the ICU has a higher mortality rate than any other hospital unit--between 8% and 19%, totaling roughly 500,000 deaths a year. Those who do not die may suffer in other ways, such as long-term physical and mental impairment. For nurses, working in one can easily lead to burnout because it takes so much physical and emotional stamina to administer round-the-clock care. Now a new paper, published in Nature Digital Medicine, shows how AI might be able to help.


Fei-Fei Li Wants AI to Care More About Humans

WIRED

Fei-Fei Li heard the crackle of a cat's brain cells a couple of decades ago and has never forgotten it. Researchers had inserted electrodes into the animal's brain and connected them to a loudspeaker, filling a lab at Princeton with the eerie sound of firing neurons. "They played the symphony of a mammalian visual system," she told an audience Monday at Stanford, where she is now a professor. The music of the brain helped convince Li to dedicate herself to studying intelligence--a path that led the physics undergraduate to specializing in artificial intelligence, and helping catalyze the recent flourishing of AI technology and use cases like self-driving cars. These days, though, Li is concerned that the technology she helped bring to prominence may not always make the world better.


In Defense of Telling Patients They're Dying via Robot

Slate

At 2 a.m. in February, I found myself speaking with the family of a dying man. We had never met before, and I had only just learned of the patient. As an ICU doctor, I have been in this situation on many occasions, but there was something new this time. The family was 200 miles away, and we were talking through a video camera. I was staffing the electronic intensive care unit, complete with a headset, adjustable two-way video camera, and six screens of streaming data.


Will Machines Be Able to Tell When Patients Are About to Die?

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A few years ago, on a warm sunny afternoon, my ninety-year-old father-in-law was sweeping his patio when he suddenly felt weak and dizzy. Falling to his knees, he crawled inside his condo and onto the couch. He was shaking but not confused when my wife, Susan, came over minutes later, since we lived just a block away. She texted me at work, where I was just finishing my clinic, and asked me to come over. When I got there, he was weak and couldn't stand up on his own, and it was unclear what had caused this spell.


Cedars-Sinai puts Amazon Alexa in patient rooms as part of a pilot program

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Los Angeles medical center Cedars-Sinai is currently piloting a program that places Amazon Echos in more than 100 patient rooms. The smart speakers use Aiva, a voice assistant platform for healthcare, and is intended to help patients communicate with their caregivers. Letting patients use Alexa to perform basic tasks like changing TV channels also frees up nurses to perform medical care. Backed by Amazon's Alexa Fund and the Google Assistant Investment Program, Aiva also participated in the Cedars-Sina accelerator program for healthcare startups. The platform also works with Google Home.


LA's Cedars-Sinai adds Alexa devices to 100 hospital rooms

FOX News

Cedars-Sinai is making some of its hospital rooms a little more like home for patients with the help of Amazon Alexa. The Los Angeles hospital on Monday said it's piloting a system called Avia, which it calls "the world's first patient-centered voice assistant platform for hospitals." As part of the pilot, Cedars-Sinai has equipped more than 100 rooms with Amazon Echo smart speakers so patients can use Alexa to control the TV or summon a nurse with just the sound of their voice. Patients in these "smart hospital rooms" can say things like "Alexa, change the channel to ESPN" when they want to watch sports on TV or "Alexa, tell my nurse I need to use the restroom" when they need assistance getting out of bed. Healthcare requests are sent to the appropriate person's mobile phone--whether that be a caregiver, nurse, clinical partner, manager, or administrator.