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Average person has over 6,000 thoughts per day, according to study that isolated a 'thought worm'

Daily Mail - Science & tech

The average person has more than 6,000 thoughts in a single day, according to a new study. Researchers designed a new method that pinpoints the beginning and ending of a thought, allowing them to calculate how many we have per day. This was done by isolating specific moments when an individual is focused on a single idea, which has been described as a'thought worm.' The team also notes that measuring a person's thought measures can predict aspects of their personality. Researchers designed a new method that pinpoints the beginning and ending of a thought, allowing them to calculate how many we have per day.


Our universe could have been spinning around, new study that might change our understanding of the cosmos suggests

The Independent - Tech

Galaxies are spinning in different directions, scientists have found – a discovery that could change our undertstanding of the structure of the universe. The spin of those galaxies seem to suggest there are unexpected and unexplained links between the directions of their spin. The structure formed by those unusual links could suggest that the early universe was also spinning, according to the new study. That is in conflict with previous understandings of the structure of the universe at the largest scale. For decades, scientists have believed that the universe is expanding in no particular direction, with the galaxies inside of it distributed with no particular structure.


North Atlantic right whales are being weakened by commercial fishing nets, according to new study

Daily Mail - Science & tech

A comprehensive new study of North Atlantic right whales has found the species is significantly smaller and less healthy than southern right whales and could be wiped out in the next 20 years without intervention. The study, the largest of its kind, was organized by Dr. Fredrik Christiansen or Aarhus University in Denmark and involved 12 research institutions across five countries. The team used a fleet of drones to capture images of right whales in the North Atlantic and three major regions in the southern hemisphere. A team of researchers organized by Dr. Fredrik Christiansen or Aarhus University in Denmark used drones to photograph right whales around the world and found North Atlantic right whales are far smaller and less healthy than their southern hemisphere counterparts Using a technique called'aerial photogrammetry,' the team correlated basic information about whale width and length to make determinations about the general health of the whales. In an interview with National Geographic, Christiansen said the team was shocked to find the North Atlantic right whales'looked like a runway…you could basically set up a tent on their backs.'


Six-month-olds see people who imitate them as more friendly

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Babies know when you imitate them - and they perceive it as a sign of friendliness, according to a new study. Swedish research suggest the imitation game is an infant's favourite way of interacting with adults, making them more engaged and likely to approach an adult. In experiments, six-month-old babies looked and smiled longer, and tried to approach the adult more often during the close mirroring of their actions. Babies also responded to being imitated with'testing behaviour' – actions that encouraged the adult imitator to imitate in turn. Imitation on behalf of the adult helps nurture a baby's sensitivity to others and could be a driving force of driving early social cognition, the research team report.



Using delivery drones in cities consumes MORE energy than vans, according to new research

Daily Mail - Science & tech

A new study has found that using delivery drones in dense urban environments might actually consume more energy than a conventional delivery van. Thomas Kirschstein, an economist at Martin Luther University in Halle-Wittenberg, Germany, developed a simulation to compare how energy efficient different delivery methods would be in a large and crowded city. He compared a delivery drone, electric van, and diesel van as they traveled through a digital recreation of Berlin to see which required the least amount of fossil fuel to complete equivalent delivery routes. The clear winner were electric vans, which consumed more than 50 percent less energy than diesel vans. The biggest surprise, however, came from drones, which turned out to be the most energy hungry of all the delivery methods, consuming as much as 10 times the amount of energy that the electric vans did.


How AI trained to read scientific papers could predict future discoveries

#artificialintelligence

Creativity isn't the only route to discovery – automated analysis of huge amounts of data works, too. "Can machines think?", asked the famous mathematician, code breaker and computer scientist Alan Turing almost 70 years ago. Today, some experts have no doubt that artificial intelligence (AI) will soon be able to develop the kind of general intelligence that humans have. But others argue that machines will never measure up. Although AI can already outperform humans on certain tasks – just like calculators – they can't be taught human creativity.


Claims Of Robots Outperforming Human Doctors Are Exaggerated, Study Finds

#artificialintelligence

It feels like each year we move closer towards a reality that is straight out of a science fiction film. Artificial intelligence and robotics continue to advance at a rapid rate, and it seems like we'll all be living in a The Jetsons like landscape sooner rather than later. As far as the integration of AI into medicine, though, a new study is advising everyone to pump the brakes. A number of recent research projects have concluded that artificial intelligence is already just as good, if not better, at interpreting medical images than highly trained human doctors and medical professionals. Now, however, an international study comprised of American and British researchers is warning that such claims are exaggerated, inaccurate, and potentially dangerous for patients the world over.


Claims Of Robots Outperforming Human Doctors Are Exaggerated, Study Finds

#artificialintelligence

It feels like each year we move closer towards a reality that is straight out of a science fiction film. Artificial intelligence and robotics continue to advance at a rapid rate, and it seems like we'll all be living in a The Jetsons like landscape sooner rather than later. As far as the integration of AI into medicine, though, a new study is advising everyone to pump the brakes. A number of recent research projects have concluded that artificial intelligence is already just as good, if not better, at interpreting medical images than highly trained human doctors and medical professionals. Now, however, an international study comprised of American and British researchers is warning that such claims are exaggerated, inaccurate, and potentially dangerous for patients the world over.


Your brain waves could predict if an antidepressant will work for you

#artificialintelligence

For patients seeking relief from depression, it can take months to pin down an effective treatment. But brain wave patterns could potentially help to predict how individual patients would respond to an antidepressant before treatment even begins, according to a new study published Feb. 10 in the journal Nature Biotechnology. The study addresses one of psychiatry's fundamental challenges: a lack of tests that can help doctors decide the best treatment options for patients with depression, said study co-author Dr. Madhukar Trivedi, a psychiatry professor at UT Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas. Instead, Trivedi said, providers rely on a trial-and-error process in which patients try out medications on six- to eight-week cycles. This imprecise method contributes to a general perception that antidepressants are ineffective, added Dr. Amit Etkin, study co-author and a professor of psychiatry at Stanford University.