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Responsible AI at Accenture: In Conversation with Marisa Tricarico

#artificialintelligence

Accenture's partnership with AI4ALL gives emerging leaders exposure to Responsible AI in practice. The field of AI is changing rapidly, making the need for responsible AI greater than ever. While only 18% of data science students reported learning about ethics in a recent industry survey, examples of AI products with unintended negative consequences continue to grow. Marisa Tricarico, the North America Practice Lead for Responsible AI at Accenture, has a unique perspective on the rapid expansion of this field, as she works with a growing roster of Accenture clients as they develop and deploy AI. Marisa and Accenture's work intersects with AI4ALL's work to train the next generation of responsible AI leaders as well.


Our Quest to Understand the Human Brain is Limited by Ethics, Not Science

Slate

Slate has relationships with various online retailers. If you buy something through our links, Slate may earn an affiliate commission. We update links when possible, but note that deals can expire and all prices are subject to change. All prices were up to date at the time of publication. Adapted from The Spike: An Epic Journey Through the Brain in 2.1 Seconds 2021 Mark Humphries, reprinted with permission from Princeton University Press. We are facing a hard limit to how well we can understand the human brain.


Artificial Intelligence Research at Duke

#artificialintelligence

Artificial Intelligence research at Duke covers everything from health to enhancing photos to machine learning. See what some Duke researchers are doing in the field. During Winter Breakaway, David Carlson, an assistant professor in Civil and Environmental Engineering taught "AI for Everyone," which included an introduction to the math and computations underlying machine learning and artificial intelligence. Duke student brothers worked together in a home office in Tampa to develop a machine learning system to help clinicians spot the telltale'ground glass opacities' in the lung scans of potential Covid patients. Because no two brains are alike, machine learning is being used to help neurosurgeons home in on the precise area where the electrode should go to treat Parkinson's disease with deep brain stimulation.


Cocoa could help obese people lose weight, study claims

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Substituting a cup of cocoa throughout the day for other snacks could help obese people lose weight – even if they're on a high-fat diet, a new study claims. In lab experiments, US researchers gave obese mice with liver disease a dietary supplement of cocoa powder, for a period of eight weeks. Even though the mice were on a high-fat diet, the experts found the supplement reduced DNA damage and the amount of fat in their livers. While there is more to learn about the health benefits of cocoa, the researchers believe it may in some way impede the digestion of dietary fat and carbohydrate, thereby avoiding weight gain. Supplementation of cocoa powder in the diet of high-fat-fed mice with liver disease markedly reduced the severity of their condition, according to a new study.


Data Science in Healthcare - 7 Applications No one will Tell You - DataFlair

#artificialintelligence

Data Science is rapidly growing to occupy all the industries of the world today. In this topic, we will understand how data science is transforming the healthcare sector. We will understand various underlying concepts of data science, used in medicine and biotechnology. Medicine and healthcare are two of the most important part of our human lives. Traditionally, medicine solely relied on the discretion advised by the doctors. For example, a doctor would have to suggest suitable treatments based on a patient's symptoms.


Tag: Artificial intelligence (and IIT)

#artificialintelligence

A really significant change in brain science in recent years has been the gradual acceptance in mainstream science venues of sympathy for panpsychism -- the position that everything is conscious to some degree. Leading neuroscientist Christof Koch, for example, explained last month in MIT Reader: But who else, besides myself, has experiences? Because you are so similar to me, I abduce that you do. The same logic applies to other people. Apart from the occasional solitary solipsist this is uncontroversial.


Artificial intelligence can accelerate clinical diagnosis of fragile X syndrome

#artificialintelligence

An analysis of electronic health records for 1.7 million Wisconsin patients revealed a variety of health problems newly associated with fragile X syndrome, the most common inherited cause of intellectual disability and autism, and may help identify cases years in advance of the typical clinical diagnosis. Researchers from the Waisman Center at the University of Wisconsin–Madison found that people with fragile X are more likely than the general population to also have diagnoses for a variety of circulatory, digestive, metabolic, respiratory, and genital and urinary disorders. Their study, published recently in the journal Genetics in Medicine, the official journal of the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics, shows that machine learning algorithms may help identify undiagnosed cases of fragile X syndrome based on diagnoses of other physical and mental impairments. "Machine learning is providing new opportunities to look at huge amounts of data," says lead author Arezoo Movaghar, a postdoctoral fellow at the Waisman Center. "There's no way that we can look at 2 million records and just go through them one by one. We need those tools to help us to learn from what is in the data."


Elon Musk's brain-implant lab claims this poor monkey's playing 'Pong' with its mind

Mashable

Elon Musk's brain-implant lab, Neuralink, today released video appearing to show something the tech billionaire has been bragging about since 2019: a monkey playing a video game ... with its mind. In the video (and an accompanying one of the Neuralink signal readout, if you're into that), a rhesus macaque named Pager is shown playing simple games on a screen while sucking on a straw that's delivering a tasty banana smoothie as a reward. Pager, at first, uses a joystick to move a dot around a grid, placing it onto squares that light up one by one at random. In the next sequence, he's still using the joystick -- but as the gently British-accented narrator points out, the joystick apparatus is quite clearly unplugged. The implant, we're told, is transmitting data from the electrical signals his brain emits as he plays.


Neuralink's brain-computer interface demo shows a monkey playing Pong

Engadget

Elon Musk's last update on Neuralink -- his company that is working on technology that will connect the human brain directly to a computer -- featured a pig with one of its chips implanted in its brain. Now Neuralink is demonstrating its progress by showing a Macaque with one of the Link chips playing Pong. At first using "Pager" is shown using a joystick, and then eventually, according to the narration, using only its mind via the wireless connection. Monkey plays Pong with his mind https://t.co/35NIFm4C7T Today we are pleased to reveal the Link's capability to enable a macaque monkey, named Pager, to move a cursor on a computer screen with neural activity using a 1,024 electrode fully-implanted neural recording and data transmission device, termed the N1 Link.


Algorithms similar to what Netflix and Facebook use can 'predict' the biological language of cancer

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Algorithms similar to those used by Netflix, Amazon and Facebook have shown the ability to decipher the'biological language' of cancer, Alzheimer's and other neurodegenerative diseases. Researchers trained a large-scale language model with a recommendation AI to look at what happens when something goes wrong with proteins that leads to the development of a disease. The work, conducted by St. John's College and the University of Cambridge, programed the algorithm to learn the language of shapeshifting droplets of proteins found in cells in order to understand their function and malfunction. By learning these protein droplets' language, the team can then'correct the grammatical mistakes inside cells that cause disease.'' Professor Tuomas Knowles, a Fellow at St John's College, said: 'Any defects connected with these protein droplets can lead to diseases such as cancer. 'This is why bringing natural language processing technology into research into the molecular origins of protein malfunction is vital if we want to be able to correct the grammatical mistakes inside cells that cause disease.' Machine learning technology has made waves in the tech industry – Netflix uses it to recommend series, Facebook's suggest someone to friend and Amazon's Alexa has an algorithm to recognize people based on their voice.