neurology


Neuroscientist unveils series of mind-boggling challenges for launch of new BBC show

Daily Mail - Science & tech

A new BBC game show is to pit families against one another with a series of brain tests designed to assess different types of intelligence - but are you up to passing any of the cognitive challenges? The Family Brain Games, hosted by Dara Ó Briain, will follow eight different families from all walks of life as they come together in a specially designed'games lab' to compete in the ultimate test of intelligence. Questions are designed to go beyond traditional ideas about how to measure brain power, such as individual IQ. They will instead explore other measures including verbal ability, memory ability and even group intelligence. Dr Adam Hampshire, a neuroscientist at Imperial College London, is one of the brains behind the tests.


ohbm/OpenScienceRoom2019

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The official Twitter hashtag set of the Open Science Room for 2019 is #OHBM2019 #OSR. Use it to coordinate events, meetings and discussions! Scroll down to see details of the Oral sessions and demos, Lightning talks and Scheduled meetings in the Open Science Room. How are journals, granting agencies, and consortia working alongside the open science movement? This session will explore recently introduced policy changes from each of these groups, focusing on their motivations and the potential impact on the academic ecosystem.


Researchers develop artificial intelligence tool to help detect brain aneurysms

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Doctors could soon get some help from an artificial intelligence tool when diagnosing brain aneurysms -- bulges in blood vessels in the brain that can leak or burst open, potentially leading to stroke, brain damage or death. The AI tool, developed by researchers at Stanford and detailed in a paper published June 7 in JAMA Network Open, highlights areas of a brain scan that are likely to contain an aneurysm. "There's been a lot of concern about how machine learning will actually work within the medical field," said Allison Park, a graduate student in statistics and co-lead author of the paper. "This research is an example of how humans stay involved in the diagnostic process, aided by an artificial intelligence tool." This tool, which is built around an algorithm called HeadXNet, improved clinicians' ability to correctly identify aneurysms at a level equivalent to finding six more aneurysms in 100 scans that contain aneurysms.


Scientists who scanned European al Qaeda supporters' brains found reduced activity

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Brain scans on fanatical Islamists show they have a reduced capacity for rational thought, new research suggests. Members of a radical Islamist group were asked how willing they were to'fight and die' for their ideas. Their brains were then scanned during the process. The results showed that when questioned, the part of the brain that engages in evaluating costs and consequences showed reduced activity. The scientists say this shows that when it comes to values held'sacred' to the radicals, they are immune to arguments involving costs and benefits.


New artificial intelligence tool helps diagnose brain aneurysms - Tech Explorist

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A brain aneurysm is a bulge that forms in the blood vessel of your brain that could lead to severe health issues and possibly death. The diagnosis of this aneurysms is a critically important clinical task. Now, a team of researchers at Stanford University has developed an artificial intelligence (AI) tool that can help detect brain aneurysms. The tool highlights areas of a brain scan that are likely to contain an aneurysm. "There's been a lot of concern about how machine learning will actually work within the medical field," said Allison Park, a Stanford graduate student in statistics and co-lead author of the paper.


How being able to recognise a tune helped to shape humans' brains

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Being able to recognise a tune has shaped our brains and make us distinct from our ancestors, scientists have revealed. The human brain appears uniquely tuned for musical pitch and a study involving primates suggest that speech and music may have shaped our hearing circuits. Scientists discovered that our brains can'hear' musical sound much better than one of our relatives, the macaque monkey. The study came about as a bet between two American research doctors, one of whom had done research showing that monkeys and humans see the world in the same way and wagered that sound would be no different. Being able to recognise a tune has shaped our brains and make us distinct from our ancestors, scientists have revealed.


Novel AI tool may assist radiologists for fast detection of brain aneurysms: JAMA Speciality Medical Dialogues

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A novel artificial intelligence or AI tool, developed by researchers at Stanford University may assist radiologists for fast detection of brain aneurysms revealed the findings of a study published JAMA Network Open. The paper highlighted areas of a brain scan that are likely to contain an aneurysm. A brain aneurysm is characterized as bulges in blood vessels in the brain that can leak or burst open, potentially leading to stroke, brain damage or death. This tool, which is built around an algorithm called HeadXNet, improved clinicians' ability to correctly identify aneurysms at a level equivalent to finding six more aneurysms in 100 scans that contain aneurysms. It also improved consensus among the interpreting clinicians.


Computer Vision -- An Introduction

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In the previous blog, I discussed Visual Perception and its both biological and computational aspects. This blog is specifically about computational Visual Perception, also known as Computer Vision. Computer vision has been around for more than 50 years, but recently, we see a major resurgence of interest in how machines'see' and how computer vision can be used to build products for consumers and businesses. The key driving factor behind all these is Computer Vision. In the simplest terms, Computer Vision is the discipline under a broad area of Artificial Intelligence which teaches machines to see.


Neuroscience Readies for a Showdown Over Consciousness Ideas Quanta Magazine

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Some problems in science are so hard, we don't really know what meaningful questions to ask about them -- or whether they are even truly solvable by science. Consciousness is one of those: Some researchers think it is an illusion; others say it pervades everything. Some hope to see it reduced to the underlying biology of neurons firing; others say that it is an irreducibly holistic phenomenon. The question of what kinds of physical systems are conscious "is one of the deepest, most fascinating problems in all of science," wrote the computer scientist Scott Aaronson of the University of Texas at Austin. "I don't know of any philosophical reason why [it] should be inherently unsolvable" -- but "humans seem nowhere close to solving it." Now a new project currently under review hopes to close in on some answers. It proposes to draw up a suite of experiments that will expose theories of consciousness to a merciless spotlight, in the hope of ruling out at least some of them.


Anglia Ruskin University music therapists aiming to help dementia sufferers with £2.7m project

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A £2.7 million project aimed at transforming life for people living alone with dementia, is to be trialled in Cambridgeshire by Anglia Ruskin University music therapists. They will use artificial intelligence to adapt and personalise live radio to try and address the key causes of hospital admission for those suffering from dementia. Radio Me will tackle issues such as agitation and failing to take medication correctly and as a result, it is hoped quality of life will improve with people able to remain living independently at home for longer. Jörg Fachner, professor of music, Health and the brain at ARU, said: "Our role is to investigate precisely how people with dementia can benefit from this interactive radio experience. "Music therapists at ARU and partner organisations will use biomarker responses to fine-tune playlists in order to deliver emotional and cognitive stimulation, and evaluate exactly how interactive music interventions, using AI, can benefit people with dementia in their own homes and in assisted living environments." Professor Eduardo Miranda, from the University of Plymouth, added: "Radio Me builds on research carried out as part of our previous EPSRC-funded project into a brain computer music interface, as well as our work on artificial intelligence, music influencing emotion, and the University's long-running involvement in shaping national policy on dementia.