jetpack


'Close Encounters' Limited Time Mode Starts Tomorrow In 'Fortnite: Battle Royale'

Forbes Technology

Last night I had a daily challenge pop up on my Fortnite: Battle Royale account asking me to eliminate four players with shotguns, and I haven't gotten to it yet. I think I may just wait for tomorrow, because shotguns will be readily available in the upcoming "Close Encounters" Limited Time Mode, which starts tomorrow, likely at 4:00 a.m. Close Encounters sounds a little bit like Tequila Sunrise, a limited time mode that ran in PlayerUnkown's Battlegrounds recently but with one major addition: Jetpacks. Weapon drops will be limited to shotguns, which were already one of the most popular weapon types in the game. Tactical and Pump Action shotguns will spawn as floor loot, with Heavy Shotguns and Jetpacks reserved for chests and supply drops.


Jetpacks and Tech-Enabled Cities: How We'll Live in the Future

WSJ.com: WSJD - Technology

Making payments using your cellphone is easier than ever. In fact, the process of buying something now often starts on a mobile device, and the relative ease of paying virtually is eliminating the need for cash or even a credit card--a trend that is sending ripples through the business world. "Why do you need cash? It's fundamentally less efficient," said Dan Schulman, the president and chief executive of payments company PayPal Holdings Inc. He said he believes digital payments will become an ever-larger industry, with many key players.


Sushi robots, AI pianos and jump jetpacks on SXSW's show floor

Engadget

Japanese companies showed up at SXSW with a handful of concepts for the future, including Lunavity, a jetpack designed to help the wearer jump higher and farther. It simulates jumping in a low-gravity space -- hence the lunar namesake -- and opens up new sports possibilities. One developer specifically mentioned quidditch, for instance. The project itself is called Open Meals, and the goal is to digitize different foods and then have robots recreate those recipes anywhere in the world (or in space, as the marketing video demonstrates). The food itself will be constructed out of a gel that can take on a variety of textures.


JetPack Aviation unveils huge new ultra-fast prototype

Daily Mail

JetPack Aviation, the firm behind the'world's only true jetpack,' has unveiled its latest prototype at CES in Las Vegas. The team showed off a massive new design geared toward short, fast trips using six turbo jet engines to travel over 150 miles an hour. JetPack Aviation teamed up with Insta360 to show off the upcoming JB11 jetpack at the Las Vegas Convention Center. JetPack Aviation, the firm behind the'world's only true jetpack,' has unveiled its latest prototype at CES in Las Vegas. JetPack Aviation's creations are capable of vertical take-off and landing, unlike other types of wearable flight systems.


The quiet revolution: how artificial intelligence is transforming marketing

#artificialintelligence

The future is always coming and yet it never quite seems to get here. Once upon a time, we were promised jetpacks. Likewise with those robot assistants that were meant to relieve 1950s housewives from the drudgery of cleaning. And then we have AI, which only started generating a buzz recently, but since then that swell of anticipation has dissipated somewhat.


the-guardian-gt

WIRED

Like with jetpacks and flying cars, the Power Loader from Aliens is a robot we've been promised for a long time. That'd be the exoskeleton that Sigourney Weaver donned to beat the tar out of the movie's eponymous alien Queen, of course. Jetpacks are kinda here, flying cars … almost, and now a real-life Power Loader has finally arrived, and it's orders of magnitude more impressive than the suit of fiction. Behold the Guardian GT from Sarcos Robotics, which in all honesty is full-tilt bonkers. Bonkers in the sense that unlike the clunky Power Loader, these 7-foot-long arms replicate human motions with incredible smoothness and accuracy, each limb lifting 500 pounds, then turning around and manipulating the most delicate of objects.


$2 million competition aims to make jetpacks a reality by 2019

Popular Science

The dream of flight was never meant to be confined to a 28-inch seat with 150 strangers and miniature bags of pretzels. Early aircraft were fabric and wood extensions of their pilots' bodies, technological exoskeletons carrying a dream into the air. While the laws of aerodynamics and engineering drove planes into long aluminum tubes with wings, fiction maintained the dream of a personal flying tool that people could strap to their back, ride through the air, and then arrive intact and on-time at work. For decades, inventors endeavored to turn jetpack from fictional whim to real machines, with some limited success, but nothing so world-changing as to enter the mass market. GoFly, a Boeing-sponsored competition announced today, wants to turn jetpacks from an aviation novelty to an everyday tool.


The quiet revolution: how artificial intelligence is transforming marketing

#artificialintelligence

The future is always coming and yet it never quite seems to get here. Once upon a time, we were promised jetpacks. Likewise with those robot assistants that were meant to relieve 1950s housewives from the drudgery of cleaning. And then we have AI, which only started generating a buzz recently, but since then that swell of anticipation has dissipated somewhat. Is it destined to go the way of the jetpack and the robot home help or is it an actual thing that's going to make a profound difference to the way you approach marketing and to every other domain that AI threatens to disrupt?


NVIDIA Introduces Jetson TX2 For Edge Machine Learning With High-Quality Customers

#artificialintelligence

Expanding on their Jetson TX1 and TK1 products for embedded computing, NVIDIA announced last week their Jetson TX2 platform--a hardware and software platform the size of a credit card designed to deliver AI computing at the edge. NVIDIA touts Jetson TX2 as delivering "unprecedented deep learning capabilities," and based on the form factor, it may be right as it paves the way for a number of cutting-edge uses--from highly intelligent factory robots and commercial drones, to cameras with AI for smart cities. NVIDIA has been running on all cylinders lately with datacenter machine learning, and I think this release, if it performs as promised, will solidify their place at the top of the machine learning class in certain classes of devices. NVIDIA announced the TX2 at an event I attended last week in San Francisco with many tier 1 vendors and startups with some interesting use cases. Jetson, by design, isn't targeted at every embedded device, it's for those non-mobile devices who need strong deep neural network performance at a given power draw. The TX2 is a significant step up from its predecessor.


NVIDIA Introduces Jetson TX2 For Edge Machine Learning With High Quality Customers

Forbes Technology

Expanding on their Jetson TX1 and TK1 products for embedded computing, NVIDIA announced last week their Jetson TX2 platform--a hardware and software platform the size of a credit card designed to deliver AI computing at the edge. NVIDIA touts Jetson TX2 as delivering "unprecedented deep learning capabilities," and based on the form factor, they may be right as it paves the way for a number of cutting-edge uses--from highly intelligent factory robots and commercial drones, to cameras with AI for smart cities. NVIDIA has been running on all cylinders lately with datacenter machine learning, and I think this release, if it performs as promised, will solidify their place at the top of the machine learning class in certain classes of devices. NVIDIA announced the TX2 at an event I attended last week in San Francisco with many tier 1 vendors and startups with some interesting use cases. Jetson, by design, isn't targeted at every embedded device, it's for those non-mobile devices who need strong deep neural network performance at a given power draw. The TX2 is a significant step up from its predecessor.