invention


Are you protecting your AI innovations?

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Breakthroughs in artificial intelligence (AI) include both simple quality of life upgrades and transformative innovations spanning every industry, from autonomous vehicles to medical diagnostic tools. Within these numerous technologies, there are a number of applications well worth patenting, begging the question: do any of your AI discoveries fall under intellectual property (IP)? By asking this question, businesses can take steps to protect their most valuable innovations and ensure they do not fall into the wrong hands. Do not doubt that plenty of people are already protecting their AI inventions. Since the 1960s, more than 300,000 applications for AI-related patents have been filed, and over 1.5 million scientific papers have been published.


The timeline of Artificial Intelligence. Verloop Blog

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This blog will take a thorough dive into the timeline of AI, beginning from the very start, the 1940s. The term "Artificial Intelligence" was first coined by the father of AI, John McCarthy in 1956. But the revolution of AI began a few years in advance, i.e. the 1940's. Around 37% of industries have implemented AI in some form, which is a 270% increase for the past 4 years. AI has taken multiple forms over the years.


BEL adopts artificial intelligence to tackle internal security challenges

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Bharat Electronics Limited (BEL) is increasingly adopting the use of Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning to throw up advanced technological solutions to internal security challenges. The Bengaluru-headquartered company may be known as a radar company, but its embrace of AI technologies is resulting in increasingly smaller but advanced inventions. During a recent interaction at Defexpo 2020 in Lucknow, the company showed DH its new Command Control System (CCS), which can track Persons of Interest (PoI) in public spaces such as airports and railway stations. "The CCS is more than a video monitoring system. Its AI system can determine anomalous behavior, identify persons of interest through their gestures or body language and even gauge their emotional state by scanning their faces," said a BEL officer.


The Rise of Robot Inventors

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Inventions becoming inventors… It might sound like sci-fi, but it's not really such a far-fetched idea. In fact, it's a prospect that's already becoming reality, given the recent news that an AI-created medicine for the treatment of OCD will be tested on humans for the first time. While the world's first patent applications for machine-designed inventions were rejected in January by the EPO, this development brings fresh attention to the AI-inventor debate. What may seem to many like simply an interesting experiment might well have far-reaching implications. Could this be the tipping point when technology goes from being a facilitator and an enhancer of human endeavour, to a developer of innovation in its own right?


Artificial intelligence raises question of who's an inventor

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Computers using artificial intelligence are discovering medicines, designing better golf clubs and creating video games. Patent offices around the world are grappling with the question of who -- if anyone -- owns innovations developed using AI. The answer may upend what's eligible for protection and who profits as AI transforms entire industries. "There are machines right now that are doing far more on their own than to help an engineer or a scientist or an inventor do their jobs," said Andrei Iancu, director of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. "We will get to a point where a court or legislature will say the human being is so disengaged, so many levels removed, that the actual human did not contribute to the inventive concept."


First-ever Robot "supermicrosurgery" performed successfully

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Robotic technology has played an important part in the medical field in the last two decades. The best example in this regard is the Da Vinci system, which is considered the best-selling surgery robot on the market today. This robot can perform high-precision surgical procedures -- down to one millimeter. However, the system comes with a hefty price tag of $2 million, plus the expensive maintenance costs. For those of you who don't know supermicrosurgery refers to a precise reconstructive procedure that connects ultra-thin blood and lymph vessels ranging from 0.3 to 0.8 millimeters.


Edison, Morse ... Watson? AI Poses Test of Who's an Inventor

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Computers using artificial intelligence are discovering medicines, designing better golf clubs and creating video games. Patent offices around the world are grappling with the question of who -- if anyone -- owns innovations developed using AI. The answer may upend what's eligible for protection and who profits as AI transforms entire industries. "There are machines right now that are doing far more on their own than to help an engineer or a scientist or an inventor do their jobs," said Andrei Iancu, director of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. "We will get to a point where a court or legislature will say the human being is so disengaged, so many levels removed, that the actual human did not contribute to the inventive concept."


Edison, Morse and Watson? AI poses question of who's an inventor

The Japan Times

WASHINGTON/SEATTLE – Computers using artificial intelligence are discovering medicines, designing better golf clubs and creating video games. Patent offices around the world are grappling with the question of who -- if anyone -- owns innovations developed using AI. The answer may upend what's eligible for protection and who profits as AI transforms entire industries. "There are machines right now that are doing far more on their own than to help an engineer or a scientist or an inventor do their jobs," said Andrei Iancu, director of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. "We will get to a point where a court or legislature will say the human being is so disengaged, so many levels removed, that the actual human did not contribute to the inventive concept."


Why AI systems should be recognized as inventors

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Existing intellectual property laws don't allow AI systems to be recognized as inventors, which threatens the integrity of the patent system and the potential to develop life-changing innovations. Current legislation only allows humans to be recognized as inventors, which could make AI-generated innovations unpatentable. This would deprive the owners of the AI of the legal protections they need for the inventions that their systems create. The Artificial Inventor Project team has been testing the limitations of these rules by filing patent applications that designate a machine as the inventor-- the first time that an AI's role as an inventor had ever been disclosed in a patent application. They made the applications on behalf of Dr Stephen Thaler, the creator of a system called DABUS, which was listed as the inventor of a food container that robots can easily grasp and a flashing warning light designed to attract attention during emergencies.


There is still one domain which machines can't take over: Human creativity

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The European Patent Office recently turned down an application for a patent that described a food container. This was not because the invention was not novel or useful, but because it was created by artificial intelligence. By law, inventors need to be actual people. This isn't the first invention by AI – machines have produced innovations ranging from scientific papers and books to new materials and music. That said, being creative is clearly one of the most remarkable human traits.