houston


Domino's teams up with Nuro for driverless pizza delivery in Houston

#artificialintelligence

Nuro, the self-driving delivery startup, is teaming up with Domino's to launch a pilot for driverless pizza delivery in Houston, Texas, the companies announced Monday. Starting later this year, Domino's will use Nuro's driverless fleet of custom-built robot cars to deliver pizza to select Houston residents who place orders online. Nuro, which was founded by two ex-members of Google's pioneering self-driving team, has been using its fleet of R1 robot cars to deliver groceries to residents of Scottsdale, Arizona, and more recently, Houston. If the pilot with Domino's goes well, it's safe to assume Nuro will look to expand it to other markets as well. Nuro has been ramping up its activities in recent months since receiving a $1 billion investment from Japanese tech company SoftBank.


Meet your new chief of staff: An AI chatbot – TechCrunch

#artificialintelligence

Years ago, a mobile app for email launched to immediate fanfare. Simply called Mailbox, its life was woefully cut short -- we'll get to that. Today, its founders are back with their second act: An AI-enabled assistant called Navigator meant to help teams work and communicate more efficiently. With the support of $12 million in Series A funding from CRV, #Angels, Designer Fund, SV Angel, Dropbox's Drew Houston and other angel investors, Aspen, the San Francisco and Seattle-based startup behind Navigator, has quietly been beta testing its tool within 50 organizations across the U.S. "We've had teams and research institutes and churches and academic institutions, places that aren't businesses at all in addition to smaller startups and large four-figure-person organizations using it," Mailbox and Navigator co-founder and chief executive officer Gentry Underwood tells TechCrunch. "Pretty much anywhere you have meetings, there is value for Navigator."


Domino's will begin using self-driving robotic trucks to deliver pizzas in Houston this year

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Domino's could be putting some of its delivery drivers out of a job this year by rolling out a new wave of robot delivery vehicles in Texas. The robot vehicles, made by the well-funded autonomous driving startup, Nuro, are entirely self-driving and can cart their cargo -- in this case Domino's pizza -- via in-unit storage. Once the robot arrives at its destination, customers must meet the vehicle and use a special pin provided to them upon ordering to unlock the hatch and collect their delivery. Domino's will take the next step in autonomous delivery by partnering with Nuro to deliver pizzas via robot cars. Silicon Valley-based startup, Nuro, will partner with Domino's Pizza to deliver in Houston, Texas.


Domino's to test autonomous delivery vehicles

FOX News

Fox News Flash top headlines for June 17 are here. Check out what's clicking on Foxnews.com Domino's plans to test pizza delivery using fully autonomous vehicles in Houston. The world's biggest pizza company is teaming up with Nuro, a Silicon Valley startup that makes unmanned delivery vehicles. Nuro is also partners with Kroger Co.


Funding of $5.5m announced for machine learning for geothermal work

#artificialintelligence

University of Southern California (Los Angeles, CA): Developing novel data-driven predictive models for integration into real-time fault detection and diagnosis, and integrate those models by using predictive control algorithms to improve the efficiency of energy production operations in a geothermal power plant. The project will develop deep dynamic neural networks for fault prediction and predictive process control workflows to improve the efficiency of geothermal operations. Upflow Limited (Taupo, New Zealand): Making available multiple decades of closely-guarded production data from one of the world's longest operating geothermal fields, and combining it with the archives from the largest geothermal company operating in the U.S. Models developed from this massive data store will enable the creation of a prediction/recommendation engine that will help operators improve plant availability. Colorado School of Mines (Golden, CO): Applying new machine learning techniques to analyze remote-sensing images, with the goal of developing a process to identify the presence of blind geothermal resources based on surface characteristics. Colorado School of Mines will develop a methodology to automatically label data from hyperspectral images of Brady's Hot Springs, Desert Rock, and the Salton Sea.


Nuro expands Kroger driverless deliveries to Houston

#artificialintelligence

Nuro, a self-driving car company founded by two former Google employees, today announced that it's expanding its driverless delivery partnership with grocery giant Kroger to a new market: Houston. This follows pilots in Scottsdale, Arizona that kicked off in August, first with a fleet of modified Toyota Priuses and then with Nuro's custom vehicle, R1. In Houston, Nuro will service four zip codes -- 77401, 77096, 77005, and 77025 -- near two Kroger locations, one on 10306 South Post Oak Road and other off of 5150 Buffalo Speedway. Customers within range will be able to place autonomous same-day or next-day delivery orders via Kroger's website or app seven days a week (based on slot availability) later this spring, for a flat price of $5.95. Once an order is placed, store employees will load the groceries into one of several compartments in Nuro's thin, stout R1, which packs a proprietary mix of laser sensors, cameras, and computers.


Machine learning 'causing science crisis'

#artificialintelligence

Machine-learning techniques used by thousands of scientists to analyse data are producing results that are misleading and often completely wrong. Dr Genevera Allen from Rice University in Houston said that the increased use of such systems was contributing to a "crisis in science". She warned scientists that if they didn't improve their techniques they would be wasting both time and money. Her research was presented at the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Washington. A growing amount of scientific research involves using machine learning software to analyse data that has already been collected.


Addressing the promises and challenges of AI

#artificialintelligence

A three-day celebration event this week for the MIT Stephen A. Schwarzman College of Computing put focus on the Institute's new role in helping society navigate a promising yet challenging future for artificial intelligence (AI), as it seeps into nearly all aspects of society. On Thursday, the final day of the event, a series of talks and panel discussions by researchers and industry experts conveyed enthusiasm for AI-enabled advances in many global sectors, but emphasized concerns -- on topics such as data privacy, job automation, and personal and social issues -- that accompany the computing revolution. Kicking off the day's events, MIT President Rafael Reif said the MIT Schwarzman College of Computing will train students in an interdisciplinary approach to AI. It will also train them to take a step back and weigh potential downsides of AI, which is poised to disrupt "every sector of our society." "Everyone knows pushing the limits of new technologies can be so thrilling that it's hard to think about consequences and how [AI] too might be misused," Reif said.


Is machine learning creating a science crisis? - AI Med

#artificialintelligence

Statistician Dr. Genevera Allen of Rice University in Houston called it a "crisis in science" as more scientists engaged in machine learning (ML) techniques to analyze their data. Speaking at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) in Washington earlier this month, Dr. Allen warned ML is "wasting both time and money" of scientists because it only singles out noise found within existing data patterns which may not be representative of the real World or be reproduced by another experiment. Dr. Allen believes the problem of reproducibility is especially significant when scientists employ ML on genome data to identify patients with similar genomic profiles. A common approach in precision medicine which aims to develop drugs that target specific genome of a disease. However, ML fails to yield consistent results at the moment.


Machine learning 'causing science crisis'

#artificialintelligence

Machine-learning techniques used by thousands of scientists to analyse data are producing results that are misleading and often completely wrong. Dr Genevera Allen from Rice University in Houston said that the increased use of such systems was contributing to a "crisis in science". She warned scientists that if they didn't improve their techniques they would be wasting both time and money. Her research was presented at the American Association for the Advancement of Science in Washington. A growing amount of scientific research involves using machine learning software to analyse data that has already been collected.