hairstyle


Seeing the World Through Google's Eyes – The Ringer

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Another woman discovered that the search "unprofessional hairstyles for work" yielded images of black women while "professional hairstyles for work" brought up images of white women. In 2015, users discovered that searching for "n*gga house" in Google Maps directed users to the White House. That same year, a tool that automatically categorizes images in the Google Photos app tagged a black user and his friend as gorillas, a particularly egregious error considering that comparison is often used by white supremacists as a deliberately racist insult. Camera companies like Kodak sold film that photographed white skin better than black skin, and companies like Nikon have also shown racial bias toward Caucasian features in their facial-recognition technology.


Google Allo now transforms your selfies into custom emoji

Daily Mail

The new Google Allo feature combines neural networks with the work of artists to turn selfies into personalised stickers. Rather than aim to replicate a person's exact appearance, the feature uses a lower resolution model – similar to emoji – to create a fun character. Rather than aim to replicate a person's exact appearance, the feature uses a lower resolution model – similar to emoji – to create a fun character And if you aren't happy with the character you're assigned, you can go in and personalise it. Google said: '[The] customization feature includes different hairstyles, skin tones, and nose shapes.


Do you look like your name?

FOX News

In the study, researchers found that people could correctly match an unfamiliar face to that person's name at a rate higher than expected due to chance, according to a new study. The study found that French participants could accurately identify a Veronique nearly 80 percent of the time, while Israeli participants could accurately recognize a Tom more than 52 percent of the time. In one of the study's eight experiments, French study participants were unable to match Israeli names and faces at a level above random chance, and this same effect was observed when Israeli participants were asked to match French names and faces. If, for example, society assumes that people with the name Katherine share a similar stereotype, including those based on her appearance, then people will interact with a woman named Katherine in a way that matches this shared stereotype, Zwebner explained.


New apps are helping smartphones to recognize images

AITopics Original Links

"OK, this one is pretty cool," said 6-foot-tall Omar Tayeb as he held his left hand in front of himself and snapped it with his iPhone. He didn't move the phone away. He left it there as an app detected each of his fingernails and proceeded to paint each one. On the phone's screen, Tayeb's nails turned a dazzling shade of Maybelline purple. "So the app was able to detect where my nails were, paint them in one of Maybelline's nail polish colors, then adjust to the room's lighting so it looks natural," Tayeb said.


Data-mined photos document 100 years of (forced) smiling

AITopics Original Links

Here's an odd fact: Turn-of-the-century photographers used to tell subjects to say "prunes" rather than "cheese," so that they would smile less. By studying nearly 38,000 high-school yearbook photos taken since 1905, UC Berkeley researchers have shown just how much smiling, fashion and hairstyles have changed over the years. The goal was not just to track trends, but figure out how to apply modern data-mining techniques and machine learning to a much older medium: photographs. Their research could advance deep-learning algorithms for dating historical photos and help historians study how social norms change over time. The main challenge for the team was to collect enough photos to create an "average" student profile for each decade from the 1900s to the 2010s.


Artificial intelligence is quickly becoming as biased as we are

#artificialintelligence

A simple Google image search for'women's professional hairstyles' returns the following: Your questions answered by founders, experts and thought leaders in business, design and tech. That is, until you try searching for'unprofessional women's hairstyles' and find this: In it, you'll find a hodge-podge of hairstyles sported by black women, all of which seem, well, rather normal. Artificial intelligence, in fact, is using our collective thoughts to train the next generation of automation technologies. In five years, 10 years, 25 years, you can imagine how much of our lives will be dictated by algorithms.


Artificial intelligence is quickly becoming as biased as we are

#artificialintelligence

A simple Google image search for'women's professional hairstyles' returns the following: Momentum by TNW is our New York technology event for anyone interested in helping their company grow. That is, until you try searching for'unprofessional women's hairstyles' and find this: In it, you'll find a hodge-podge of hairstyles sported by black women, all of which seem, well, rather normal. In fact, Boing Boing spotted this back in April. In five years, 10 years, 25 years, you can imagine how much of our lives will be dictated by algorithms.


Artificial intelligence is quickly becoming as biased as we are

#artificialintelligence

A simple Google image search for'women's professional hairstyles' returns the following: This is your chance to join them. That is, until you try searching for'unprofessional women's hairstyles' and find this: In it, you'll find a hodge-podge of hairstyles sported by black women, all of which seem, well, rather normal. In fact, Boing Boing spotted this back in April. In five years, 10 years, 25 years, you can imagine how much of our lives will be dictated by algorithms.


Artificial intelligence is quickly becoming as biased as we are

#artificialintelligence

A simple Google image search for'women's professional hairstyles' returns the following: We're back in New York this November for the 4th edition of our growth-focused technology event. That is, until you try searching for'unprofessional women's hairstyles' and find this: In it, you'll find a hodge-podge of hairstyles sported by black women, all of which seem, well, rather normal. In fact, Boing Boing spotted this back in April. In five years, 10 years, 25 years, you can imagine how much of our lives will be dictated by algorithms.


Artificial intelligence is quickly becoming as biased as we are

#artificialintelligence

A simple Google image search for'women's professional hairstyles' returns the following: We're back in New York this November for the 4th edition of our growth-focused technology event. That is, until you try searching for'unprofessional women's hairstyles' and find this: In it, you'll find a hodge-podge of hairstyles sported by black women, all of which seem, well, rather normal. In fact, Boing Boing spotted this back in April. In five years, 10 years, 25 years, you can imagine how much of our lives will be dictated by algorithms.