hairstyle


Face It – The Artificially Intelligent Hairstylist

@machinelearnbot

Face It is a mobile application that uses computer vision to acquire data about a user's facial structure as well as machine learning to determine the user's face shape. This information is then combined with manually inputted information to give the user a personalized set of hair and beard styles that are guaranteed to make the user look his best. A personalized list of tips are also generated for the user to take into account when getting a haircut.


Seeing the World Through Google's Eyes – The Ringer

#artificialintelligence

Amid a handful of announcements at the I/O developers' conference Wednesday, Google introduced a feature that allows you to Shazam the world. Point it at a concert poster, and your screen will pull up tickets. Point it at a flower, and it will school you on the species. The feature was a crowd favorite. At no other point in the company's two-hour keynote did the audience cheer so loudly than when engineering VP Scott Huffman aimed the camera at a router's network information and automatically logged onto the Wi-Fi.


Google Allo now transforms your selfies into custom emoji

Daily Mail

Every day, an estimated one million selfies are taken around the world. In a bid to make selfies more exciting, Google has introduced a new feature in its messaging app, Allo. The tool combines AI with the work of artists to turn selfies into custom emoji stickers. Users can snap a quick photo of themselves, and it will automatically be transformed into a cartoon, with customisation options to help personalise the avatar further. The new Google Allo feature combines neural networks with the work of artists to turn selfies into personalised stickers.


Do you look like your name?

FOX News

If you've ever caught yourself thinking, "She looks like a Sue," or "He doesn't look like a Bob," a new study may back up your instincts about whether people's names suit them. In fact, people often do "look like their names," perhaps especially those named Tom or Veronique, the research suggests. In the study, researchers found that people could correctly match an unfamiliar face to that person's name at a rate higher than expected due to chance, according to a new study. In two experiments involving 185 participants in Israel and France, people were shown only color headshot photographs of 25 total strangers, and the researchers asked them to guess the stranger's name from a list of four or five name possibilities. For example, a participant who is shown a face and given four names to choose from has a 25 percent chance of guessing the right name.


Data-mined photos document 100 years of (forced) smiling

AITopics Original Links

Here's an odd fact: Turn-of-the-century photographers used to tell subjects to say "prunes" rather than "cheese," so that they would smile less. By studying nearly 38,000 high-school yearbook photos taken since 1905, UC Berkeley researchers have shown just how much smiling, fashion and hairstyles have changed over the years. The goal was not just to track trends, but figure out how to apply modern data-mining techniques and machine learning to a much older medium: photographs. Their research could advance deep-learning algorithms for dating historical photos and help historians study how social norms change over time. The main challenge for the team was to collect enough photos to create an "average" student profile for each decade from the 1900s to the 2010s.


The AI that can show you how you'll look as an old man or woman

AITopics Original Links

Trying to picture yourself older or with a different hairstyle is near impossible. But now researchers have developed the ultimate face swap that analyzes a picture of your face, searches for images using key terms and seamlessly maps your it onto the results. Called Dreambit, this AI lets anyone see what they would look like with a different hairstyle or colour, or in a different time period, age, country or anything that can be queried in an image search engine. Dreambit lets anyone see what they would look like with a different hairstyle or colour, or in a different time period, age, country or anything that can be queried in an image search engine - as it has done with American actor George Clooney (pictured). 'Dreambit is a personalized image search engine,' reads the website.


Artificial intelligence is quickly becoming as biased as we are

#artificialintelligence

A simple Google image search for'women's professional hairstyles' returns the following: Your questions answered by founders, experts and thought leaders in business, design and tech. That is, until you try searching for'unprofessional women's hairstyles' and find this: In it, you'll find a hodge-podge of hairstyles sported by black women, all of which seem, well, rather normal. Artificial intelligence, in fact, is using our collective thoughts to train the next generation of automation technologies. In five years, 10 years, 25 years, you can imagine how much of our lives will be dictated by algorithms.


Artificial intelligence is quickly becoming as biased as we are

#artificialintelligence

A simple Google image search for'women's professional hairstyles' returns the following: Momentum by TNW is our New York technology event for anyone interested in helping their company grow. That is, until you try searching for'unprofessional women's hairstyles' and find this: In it, you'll find a hodge-podge of hairstyles sported by black women, all of which seem, well, rather normal. In fact, Boing Boing spotted this back in April. In five years, 10 years, 25 years, you can imagine how much of our lives will be dictated by algorithms.


Artificial intelligence is quickly becoming as biased as we are

#artificialintelligence

When you perform a Google search for every day queries, you don't typically expect systemic racism to rear its ugly head. Yet, if you're a woman searching for a hairstyle, that's exactly what you might find. A simple Google image search for'women's professional hairstyles' returns the following: This is your chance to join them. Here, you'll find hairstyles, generally done in a professional setting by stylists. It returns what it thinks you're looking for based on contextual clues, citations and link data.


Artificial intelligence is quickly becoming as biased as we are

#artificialintelligence

A simple Google image search for'women's professional hairstyles' returns the following: We're back in New York this November for the 4th edition of our growth-focused technology event. That is, until you try searching for'unprofessional women's hairstyles' and find this: In it, you'll find a hodge-podge of hairstyles sported by black women, all of which seem, well, rather normal. In fact, Boing Boing spotted this back in April. In five years, 10 years, 25 years, you can imagine how much of our lives will be dictated by algorithms.