government


Here's Why AI Can't Solve Everything

#artificialintelligence

The hysteria about the future of artificial intelligence (AI) is everywhere. There seems to be no shortage of sensationalist news about how AI could cure diseases, accelerate human innovation and improve human creativity. Just looking at the media headlines, you might think that we are already living in a future where AI has infiltrated every aspect of society. While it is undeniable that AI has opened up a wealth of promising opportunities, it has also led to the emergence of a mindset that can be best described as "AI solutionism". This is the philosophy that, given enough data, machine learning algorithms can solve all of humanity's problems.


How State Governments Can Protect and Win with Big Data, AI and Privacy

@machinelearnbot

I was recently asked to conduct a 2-hour workshop for the State of California Senior Legislators on the topic of "Big Data, Artificial Intelligence and Privacy." Honored by the privilege of offering my perspective on these critical topics, I shared with my home-state legislators how significant opportunities await the state. I reviewed the once-in-a-generation opportunities awaiting the great State of California ("the State"), where decision makers could vastly improve their constituents' quality of life, while creating new sources of value and economic growth. We have historical experiences and references to revisit in discerning what the government can do to nurture our "Analytics Revolution." Notably, the Industrial Revolution, holds many lessons regarding the consequences of late and/or confusing government involvement and guidance (see Figure 1).


This cyberwar just got real DW 24.05.2018

#artificialintelligence

Cyberwar may not feel like "real" war -- the kind we've known and loathed for eons and the very same we perversely reenact in video games. But some military and legal experts say cyberwar is as real as it gets. David Petraeus, a retired US General and (some say disgraced) former intelligence chief says the internet has created an entirely distinct domain of warfare, one which he calls "netwar." And that's the kind being waged by terrorists. Then there's another kind, and technically any hacker with enough computer skills can do it -- whatever the motivation.


Society needs a reboot for the Fourth Industrial Revolution

#artificialintelligence

Society's operating system needs an upgrade. The model we have been using is simply not up to the challenges of the Fourth Industrial Revolution. A new era is unfolding at breakneck speed. It has huge potential to address some of the world's most critical challenges, from food security, to reducing congestion in big cities, to increasing energy efficiency, to accelerating cures to the most intractable diseases. But it also raises a host of social and governance issues that need addressing.


Kagan: Why Google Home and Amazon Alexa can invade your privacy

#artificialintelligence

You love the idea of buying an AI and IoT device like Google Home or Amazon Echo for the holiday season. You want to speak and have it deliver a song or weather report or sports score. However, did you ever think about the other side of this coin? Here is a nagging question we all must wrestle with: As a technological innovation increases, how to we protect our personal information and privacy? AI and IoT devices like Google Home, Amazon Echo, Microsoft Cortana, Apple HomePod and countless others that are popping up in the marketplace are simply incredible.


Why AI can't solve everything

#artificialintelligence

The hysteria about the future of artificial intelligence (AI) is everywhere. There seems to be no shortage of sensationalist news about how AI could cure diseases, accelerate human innovation and improve human creativity. Just looking at the media headlines, you might think that we are already living in a future where AI has infiltrated every aspect of society. While it is undeniable that AI has opened up a wealth of promising opportunities, it has also led to the emergence of a mindset that can be best described as "AI solutionism". This is the philosophy that, given enough data, machine learning algorithms can solve all of humanity's problems.


For tax purposes, how do you define a robot?

@machinelearnbot

More and more people are talking about the new economy, and in particular, the role played by robots. As jobs are being eliminated and replaced by robots, governments are losing tax money. There are discussions as to whether robots should be taxed. Most people think of robots as machines with arms and legs: this is the most visible part of artificial intelligence. However, this is only the tip of the iceberg.


Eric Schmidt says Elon Musk is 'exactly wrong' about AI

#artificialintelligence

When former Google CEO Eric Schmidt was asked about Elon Musk's warnings about AI, he had a succinct answer: "I think Elon is exactly wrong." "He doesn't understand the benefits that this technology will provide to making every human being smarter," Schmidt said. "The fact of the matter is that AI and machine learning are so fundamentally good for humanity." He acknowledged that there are risks around how the technology might be misused, but he said they're outweighed by the benefits: "The example I would offer is, would you not invent the telephone because of the possible misuse of the telephone by evil people? No, you would build the telephone and you would try to find a way to police the misuse of the telephone."


China's Perfect Storm AI Moment

#artificialintelligence

News Blog China's Perfect Storm AI Moment May 22, 2018 Robin Raskin, Founder, Living in Digital Times In July of 2017 the Chinese government issued a development plan to make the country the world leader in artificial intelligence by 2030. So far things are going better than pretty well. The government's commitment to AI dominance, the sheer amount of data that a country as large as China can feed to its AI learning systems, a mobile-dominated infrastructure, and an edge on chip manufacturing for AI-intensive activities like facial and image recognition contribute to China's AI success story. Deep machine learning, the ability for machines to ingest data, learn from it and then make predictions from it requires lots of data. "There are 160 cities in China with over 1 million people; there are 10 in the U.S., says Deborah Weinswig, Senior Analyst for Fung.


Two winners announced for "Nobel Prize" of robotics

ZDNet

Two winners have been announced for the 2018 Joseph F. Engelberger Robotics Awards, considered the most prestigious honor in robotics. The Award for Technology will go to Universal Robots CTO Esben H. Østergaard, who is one of the inventors driving collaborative robotics technology. The Award for Leadership will go to Gudrun Litzenberger, General Secretary of the International Federation of Robotics (IFR), an international consortium that provides surveys, studies, and data on automation and its impacts to industry, governments, and organizations such as the United Nations. Joseph F. Engelberger, for whom the awards are named, is often called the "Father of Industrial Robotics." An engineer and entrepreneur, he teamed up with inventor George Devol in the mid-1950s to found Unimation, the company behind Unimate, the first industrial robot.