government


Mark Zuckerberg meets EU officials as bloc's new tech rules loom

The Japan Times

LONDON – Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg met top European Union officials on a visit to Brussels on Monday, days before the bloc is expected to release new proposals on regulating artificial intelligence. The billionaire social network founder is the latest U.S. tech executive to make the trip to the headquarters of the EU, which is becoming an increasingly important player in technology regulation. Zuckerberg's visit came as the company warned that potential regulation risked stifling innovation. Zuckerberg met Margrethe Vestager, the EU's powerful executive vice president in charge of making Europe "fit for the digital age." He also had audiences with Thierry Breton, commissioner for the internal market, and Vera Jourova, vice president for values and transparency.


Self-driving electric powered vehicle that changes COLOUR could be on the roads by 2050

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Self-driving electric vehicles that change colour could be seen hitting the roads by 2050, automotive firm Auto Trader has claimed. Their predictions for the car of the future have been guided by so-called'futurologist' Tom Cheesewright and a survey of more than 2,000 UK drivers. They think the car of 2050 will include an all-electric cabin fitted with 360 panoramic glass windows and body panels that will change colours. Auto Trader has revealed how it envisions how the future of driving will look like in the year 2050. It includes an all-electric cabin fitted with 360 panoramic glass windows and body panels that will change colours (pictured, artist's impression) The 2050 car would supposedly come with fitted with windows that extend into the roof to form a large bubble.


Deloitte Showcases Latest In AI Technology In Dubai Al Bawaba

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Deloitte today launched its Middle East inaugural Experience Analytics event in Dubai at Dubai Studio City. Experience Analytics is a globally recognised Deloitte event and has previously taken place in London, Amsterdam and Berlin. The theme is'Me, Myself, and AI' and brings together a combination of technology showcases and practical sessions that explore a number of topics across Analytics and Artificial Intelligence. It is not about people vs. machines but about how human collaboration and decision-making can be enhanced through the use of machines – this has been coined by Deloitte as the "Age of With". "We believe that we are entering an important phase for society in the Age of With, and in order to make a true impact that matters, we understand how important it is to collaborate and leverage our relationships with our alliances and eco-system partners to build the best solutions for our clients. Some of our global alliance partners for the event are Google, SAP, Informatica and Cloudera," said Rajeev Lalwani, Deloitte's Leader for Strategy, Analytics and M&A in the Middle East.


Oh great, the EU has ditched its facial recognition ban

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The European Union is backing away from its plan to introduce a temporary ban on facial recognition technology -- instead delegating decisions on the software to its member states. In a previous draft of a paper on AI, the European Commission had proposed introducing a five-year moratorium on the technology. But in a new draft seen by the Financial Times, that suggestion has been dropped. "The early draft floated the idea of a full ban, which is very popular among civil rights campaigners worried about abuse," a person with direct knowledge of the discussions told the FT. "But the security community is against the ban because they think it's a good tool."


Let's see how much autonomous cars are expected on the road in 2025

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Encouraging many people into electrical conveyance is at the heart of the government's struggle to tackle climate change. Sales of every-electrical conveyance are up 70% on last year, leading to the thought that we have reached a turning point. But there are better causes to remain cagey. One of the UK's popular cars is the every-electrical Tesla Model 3. But its success doesn't alteration the information that just about 1.1% of new cars sold this year are electrical, and that the market for used electrical vehicles barely exists.


Artificial Intelligence And The Law: What You Need To Know - TSG Training

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Artificial intelligence has been growing in popularity in many industries, and with more and more advances in technology, it is becoming increasingly commonplace every single day. Artificial Intelligence, or AI, is broadly the concept of machines having the ability to carry out tasks in a smart manner. This has led to further applications such as machine learning, which is the concept that machines can take the relevant data and learn from it. As more and more businesses are beginning to adopt various forms of artificial intelligence, it is essential to be aware of the laws and regulations surrounding these technologies. This article will cover the things you need to know surrounding AI and the law.


AWS CEO Andy Jassy On Channel Conflict, Competition And AI

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"There's this folklore mythology around if Amazon launches a business in a certain area, it means that all the other businesses in those areas are not going to be as successful," Jassy said at the Goldman Sachs Technology and Internet Conference in San Francisco yesterday. "I just haven't seen it." There are only two significant industries that Amazon has "disrupted," according to Jassy: retail with Amazon.com, and technology infrastructure with AWS. His remarks come as federal and state regulators are conducting antitrust probes to determine whether Amazon and other technology giants stifle competition and innovation. "In both cases, they were models that were pretty antiquated, and customers weren't so happy with those models, and somebody was going to end up reinventing them," Jassy said.


Real-world AI threats in cybersecurity aren't science fiction

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For some, fears of AI lie in images of robot overlords and self-aware malware -- the stuff of science fiction. Among the many threats we will deal with in the coming years, sentient AI taking over the world isn't one of them. But AI that empowers cybercriminals is a very serious reality, even as some espouse the benefits of AI in cybersecurity. Over the past decade, advances in technology have reduced the time criminals need to modify malware samples or identify vulnerabilities. Those tools have become readily available, leading to an increase in the development and distribution of "regular" threats, like adware, trojans, and ransomware.


An Emerging Model for Ethical AI: Jessica Fjeld - Workflow

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Businesses and governments around the world face a complex challenge: How should they implement artificial intelligence (AI) in ways that respect human rights, avoid bias, incorporate diverse perspectives, and yield safe, socially beneficial products? In recent years, numerous AI "principles documents" have emerged from governments, private companies, and advocacy groups. Researchers at Harvard's Berkman Klein Center for Internet & Society studied 36 of these documents. They found significant consensus around core issues such as privacy, transparency, and bias. In January they published their findings in a white paper and in a graphic model of ethical AI principles.


Why Clearview AI is a threat to us all

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Clearview AI was founded in 2017 by Richard Schwartz and now-CEO Hoan Ton-That. The company counts Peter Thiel and AngelList founder Naval Ravikant among its investors. Clearview's technology is actually quite simple: Its facial recognition algorithm compares the image of a person's face from security camera footage to an existing database of potential matches. Marketed primarily to law enforcement agencies, the Clearview app allows users to take and upload a picture of a person then view all of the public images of that person as well as links to where those photos were published. Basically, if you're caught on camera anywhere in public, local law enforcement can use that image to mine your entire online presence for information about you, effectively ending any semblance of personal privacy.