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How AI can empower communities and strengthen democracy

#artificialintelligence

Each Fourth of July for the past five years I've written about AI with the potential to positively impact democratic societies. I return to this question with the hope of shining a light on technology that can strengthen communities, protect privacy and freedoms, or otherwise support the public good. This series is grounded in the principle that artificial intelligence can is capable of not just value extraction, but individual and societal empowerment. While AI solutions often propagate bias, they can also be used to detect that bias. As Dr. Safiya Noble has pointed out, artificial intelligence is one of the critical human rights issues of our lifetimes.


China and AI: What the World Can Learn and What It Should Be Wary of

#artificialintelligence

China announced in 2017 its ambition to become the world leader in artificial intelligence (AI) by 2030. While the US still leads in absolute terms, China appears to be making more rapid progress than either the US or the EU, and central and local government spending on AI in China is estimated to be in the tens of billions of dollars. The move has led--at least in the West--to warnings of a global AI arms race and concerns about the growing reach of China's authoritarian surveillance state. But treating China as a "villain" in this way is both overly simplistic and potentially costly. While there are undoubtedly aspects of the Chinese government's approach to AI that are highly concerning and rightly should be condemned, it's important that this does not cloud all analysis of China's AI innovation.


Europe's data revolution

#artificialintelligence

The growth potential of the data economy is mind-blowing. In Europe alone, the figures and forecasts are eye-catching, to say the least. The European Commission expects the value of the data economy to rise to €829 billion by 2025, up from €301 billion in 2018. Focusing on the headline economic figures alone overlooks the enormous potential to use data to create lasting social change and improve the personal and professional lives of millions of European citizens. The term digital economy is a catch-all for a wide range of digital transformation activities.


Letters to the editor

#artificialintelligence

Artificial intelligence is an oxymoron (Technology quarterly, June 13th). Intelligence is an attribute of living things, and can best be defined as the use of information to further survival and reproduction. When a computer resists being switched off, or a robot worries about the future for its children, then, and only then, may intelligence flow. I acknowledge Richard Sutton's "bitter lesson", that attempts to build human understanding into computers rarely work, although there is nothing new here. I was aware of the folly of anthropomorphism as an AI researcher in the mid-1980s.


AI For All: The US Introduces New Bill For Affordable Research

#artificialintelligence

Yesterday, AIM published an article on how difficult it is for the small labs and individual researchers to persevere in the high compute, high-cost industry of deep learning. Today, the policymakers of the US have introduced a new bill that will ensure deep learning is affordable for all. The National AI Research Resource Task Force Act was introduced in the House by Representatives Anna G. Eshoo (D-CA) and her colleagues. This bill was met with unanimous support from the top universities and companies, which are engaged in artificial intelligence (AI) research. Some of the well-known supporters include Stanford University, Princeton University, UCLA, Carnegie Mellon University, Johns Hopkins University, OpenAI, Mozilla, Google, Amazon Web Services, Microsoft, IBM and NVIDIA amongst others.


Germany calls for tightened AI regulation at EU level

#artificialintelligence

Four months after the European Commission presented its'white paper' on Artificial Intelligence (AI), the German government said it broadly agrees with Brussels but sees a need to tighten up on security. The government is particularly concerned by the fact that only AI applications with "high risk" have to meet special requirements. According to the European Commission's'white paper', there are two criteria for AI applications with "high risk". First, they are to be used in sensitive sectors, such as health, security, or justice, and second, their concrete application should also be associated with special risks, such as discrimination, injury, or danger to life. If an AI application fulfills both criteria, it must also meet special requirements, for example with regard to data retention or human supervision.


China and AI: what the world can learn and what it should be wary of

#artificialintelligence

China announced in 2017 its ambition to become the world leader in artificial intelligence (AI) by 2030. While the US still leads in absolute terms, China appears to be making more rapid progress than either the US or the EU, and central and local government spending on AI in China is estimated to be in the tens of billions of dollars. The move has led – at least in the West – to warnings of a global AI arms race and concerns about the growing reach of China's authoritarian surveillance state. But treating China as a "villain" in this way is both overly simplistic and potentially costly. While there are undoubtedly aspects of the Chinese government's approach to AI that are highly concerning and rightly should be condemned, it's important that this does not cloud all analysis of China's AI innovation.


China and AI: what the world can learn and what it should be wary of - IPE Club

#artificialintelligence

By Hessi Elliot /The Conversation/ – China announced in 2017 its ambition to become the world leader in artificial intelligence (AI) by 2030. While the US still leads in absolute terms, China appears to be making more rapid progress than either the US or the EU, and central and local government spending on AI in China is estimated to be in the tens of billions of dollars. The move has led – at least in the West – to warnings of a global AI arms race and concerns about the growing reach of China's authoritarian surveillance state. But treating China as a "villain" in this way is both overly simplistic and potentially costly. While there are undoubtedly aspects of the Chinese government's approach to AI that are highly concerning and rightly should be condemned, it's important that this does not cloud all analysis of China's AI innovation.


Zia Khan predicts the AI of the future will only be used for good

#artificialintelligence

It took a global pandemic and stay-at-home orders for 1.5 billion people worldwide, but something is finally occurring to us: The future we thought we expected may not be the one we get. We know that things will change; how they'll change is a mystery. To envision a future altered by coronavirus, Quartz asked dozens of experts for their best predictions on how the world will be different in five years. Below is an answer from Zia Khan, the senior vice president of innovation at The Rockefeller Foundation, a private foundation that seeks to promote humanity's wellbeing. Many of his professional experiences--as a management consultant, serving on the World Economic Forum Advisory Council for Social Innovation--have helped show him how to use data and technology to positively transform people's lives.


AU$8m fleet of shark-spotting drones and drumlines for the NSW coastline

ZDNet

In a bid to protect beachgoers from the animals that live in the water they're entering, the New South Wales government will spend AU$8 million on a new strategy that includes a fleet of shark-spotting drones to patrol the state's coastline. Minister for Agriculture Adam Marshall is calling the strategy "shark management" and said it is based on five years of scientific research into shark behaviour and the most effective ways to protect beachgoers. "As a government, our number one priority is keeping people at our beaches safe and that's why we're rolling out a revamped strategy to reduce the risk of shark attacks," Marshall said on Wednesday. "Our world-leading research showed SMART drumlines and drones are the most effective detection and surveillance tools." The government, in partnership with Surf Life Saving NSW, will deploy new drones at 34 beaches across the state and deploy 35 SMART drumlines in locations deemed high-risk along the state's north coast.