fedor


Russia is about to send a humanoid AI robot to the International Space Station

#artificialintelligence

Russia's space agency Roscosmos is about to send a humanoid robot to the International Space Station. Skybot F-850 will be sent to the ISS on August 22 on board the Soyuz MS-14 spacecraft, and will spend over two weeks there before returning to Earth on September 7. The robot, also known as Fedor, made headlines in 2017 when Dmitry Rogozin, director general of Roscosmos, shared a video of it shooting guns. Shortly after he clarified they "are not creating a Terminator, but artificial intelligence that will be of great practical significance in various fields." Fedor was created to replicate the movement of a remote operator.


Russia's space agency releases eerie footage of human-like android Fedor

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Russia's space agency has released eerie footage of its human-like android which will board the International Space Station next week. Nicknamed Fedor - which stands for Final Experimental Demonstration Research - the anthropomorphous machine was seen undergoing a battery of stress-tests at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. Dubbed Putin's robo-naut, the machine can be seen determining targets and honing in on specific points, such as steering wheels, which will surely come in handy while they're in orbit. The scenes come ahead of its inclusion on the unmanned Soyuz MS-14 spacecraft on 22 August 2019. 'MMA fighter' loses temper and battles two revellers at once In action: Dubbed Putin's robo-naut, the machine can be seen determining targets and honing in on specific points, such as steering wheels, which will surely come in handy while they're in orbit On time: Putin's deputy premier, Dmitry Rogozin, claimed the war in Syria had shown Russia the importance of robots in difficult environments, and promised Fedor would make its space debut in five years - a deadline it will soon meet Fedor stands 6-foot tall, weighs no less than 233 pounds depending on extra equipment, and can lift up to 44 pounds of cargo.


Putin's robo-nauts 'to be in space by 2019'

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Russia is planning to blast two robot astronauts into space to work on the international space station. Scientists have developed the advanced machines, named FEDOR, to conduct rescues - even though they have recently been recently trained to use firearms. According to RIA Novosti, the robots could be blasted into space as soon as August 2019. Unlike previous robots, DefenseOne.com reports that these will be sent into orbit as crew members on board the Soyuz rocket and not placed into the hold. However, no humans will be on board during the launch.


Russia may send a robot 'crew' to space in 2019

Engadget

Leveraging robotics to undertake dangerous missions has obvious benefits for mankind, and space travel is no exception. In 2011, NASA sent its dexterous assistant'Robonaut 2' on a trip to the International Space Station (ISS) with the objective of working alongside presiding astronauts. Now a "source in the rocket and space industry" tells RIA Novosti that a Russian android duo could be following suit as early as next year. According to Defense One, the FEDOR androids will, in an unprecedented move, fly on the unmanned Soyuz spacecraft not as cargo, but as crew members. The Roscosmos space agency has reportedly given the flight its preliminary approval.


Russia May Put Androids in Orbit Next Year, State Media Says

#artificialintelligence

The International Space Station should prepare for the arrival of its first android crew members, Russian state media says. The Roskosmos space agency has approved a preliminary plan to send a pair of humanoid robots called FEDOR into space in August 2019, according to "a source in the space and rocket industry" quoted by the RIA Novosti website. Robots in space have become commonplace for space superpowers: the U.S. has two operational Mars rovers, China has a lunar lander on the moon and more on the way, and Russia has several now-defunct rovers on both the moon and Mars. In 2011, NASA sent Robonaut 2, a 330-pound manually controlled "humanoid" robot, to the ISS to look into how such robots might be used to perform simple, repetitive, or especially dangerous tasks. But while previous robots were shot into space on as cargo, Russia's pair of FEDORs -- the acronym stands for Final Experimental Demonstration Object Research -- will "fly for the first time to the ISS as crew members, and not as cargo in the transport compartment," RIA Novosti wrote, adding that the robots will fly in an otherwise unmanned Soyuz rocket.


Robots In Space? Unmanned Russia Missions To The International Space Station Would Cut Costs

International Business Times

This article originally appeared on the Motley Fool. Ever since the United States retired its space shuttle fleet in 2011, NASA astronauts have had to hitch rides to the International Space Station (ISS) in Russian Soyuz spaceships -- paying Russian space agency Roscosmos for the privilege. The plan is for NASA to soon switch over sometime soon to using its own rockets -- built by SpaceX and Boeing (NYSE:BA) and Lockheed Martin's (NYSE:LMT) United Launch Alliance joint venture -- but it remains an open question when these companies will have their spacecraft ready for use. In the meantime, American astronauts must continue to fork over $82 million a seat in payment for rides aboard Soyuz. And what is Russia doing with all that money, you ask?


'Not a Terminator': Russian android learns to shoot akimbo style RT

Robohub

Russian humanoid robot FEDOR has been taught to dual-wield pistols, adding one more skill to his already impressive list. Vice Prime Minister Dmitry Rogozin has shared videos of the android's exercises on Twitter. FEDOR (Final Experimental Demonstration Object Research), which is expected to go on a solo space mission in 2021, can now hit the mark with a gun in each hand.


Russian humanoid learns how to shoot a gun with both hands

Daily Mail - Science & tech

From lifting weights to driving a jeep, Russia's humanoid has learned a range of skills for when it takes off for a mission to the moon in 2021. Deemed the'cyber cosmonaut', Fedor has now demonstrated a new skill that is vital in developing its fine motor skills and decision algorithms. The massive robot's latest venture brought it to a shooting range where it squared up in front of a target, pulled the trigger and shot its first handgun with both hands. Fedor has now demonstrated a new skill that is vital in developing its fine motor skills and decision algorithms. The massive robot's latest venture brought it to a shooting range where it squared up in front of a target, pulled the trigger and shot its first handgun using both hands Russia's plan to build a colony on the moon has begun taking shape.


Russia adds gun slinging to its humanoid space robot's list of helpful skills

Mashable

Just in time for the rise in global military tensions, Russian officials have released video that's sure to calm fears all around: a death dealing humanoid robot that shoots handguns. Posted to Twitter on Friday by Russia's deputy Prime Minister, Dmitry Rogozin, the video shows the country's space robot FEDOR (Final Experimental Demonstration Object Research) accurately shooting twin pistols in a scene chillingly similar to images from The Terminator. But rather than being displayed as a not-so-subtle warning to the entire human population of the planet, Rogozin instead claims via Facebook that it's just a demonstration of the robot's dexterity and use of algorithms to execute tasks. Because double fisting lethal hand cannons is the "perfect" way to show how well a robot could, for example, delicately repair a faulty component on a space module. FEDOR was displayed last year drilling into a pile of cinderblocks and touted as an assistant to astronauts during space travel.