fedor


Russia and robots: Steel junk or a brave new world?

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Russia likes to boast of its robots - but at the same time it seems to have a somewhat troubled relationship with them. It has endured a series of very public robotic mishaps, but all is not lost. Amid much fanfare and praise for the Roscosmos space agency, Russian robot Fedor was launched into space on board a Soyuz 14 spacecraft in August. Fedor made history as the first such robot ever to be sent into space by Russia, and within moments he was reporting on his progress and all was apparently going to plan.But then, mission control in Houston broke the news that Fedor's attempt to dock with the International Space Station (ISS) had to be aborted because of a technical problem. To be fair to Fedor, he was not to blame.


Russia scraps robot Fedor after unsuccessful space odyssey

The Japan Times

MOSCOW – It's mission over for a robot called Fedor that Russia blasted to the International Space Station, the developers said Wednesday, admitting he could not replace astronauts on spacewalks. "He won't fly there any more. There's nothing more for him to do there, he's completed his mission," Yevgeny Dudorov, executive director of robot developers Androidnaya Tekhnika, told RIA Novosti news agency. The silvery anthropomorphic robot cannot fulfill its assigned task to replace human astronauts on long and risky space walks, Dudorov said. Fedor -- short for Final Experimental Demonstration Object Research -- was built to assist space station astronauts.


Fedor the six foot-tall robo-naut lends astronauts a helping hand on board the ISS

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Russia's pioneering humanoid robot Fedor has started assisting astronauts on board the International Space Station. Video footage reveals the six-foot tall robot holding a towel and a drill before handing the power tool to an astronaut. The robot was sent into space to learn new skills so that it and others like it can carry out dangerous operations instead of astronauts, such as space walks. Fedor, the nickname of the pioneering robot, stands at six foot tall, weighs 353 pounds and can perform complex movements by mimicking a human on Earth. Roscosmos hopes it will help astronauts carry out tasks remotely.


Docking aborted for Russia's first humanoid robot in space

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An unmanned spacecraft carrying Russia's first humanoid robot to be sent into orbit failed to dock at the International Space Station on Saturday, in a new setback for Moscow. "Russian cosmonauts issued a command to abort the automated approach of an uncrewed Russian Soyuz spacecraft to the International Space Station," the US space agency NASA said in a statement. "The craft was unable to lock onto its target at the station," and "backed a safe distance away from the orbital complex while the Russian flight controllers assess the next steps," NASA said. Russian flight controllers had told the ISS crew it appeared the problem that prevented automated docking was in the station and not the Soyuz spacecraft, NASA added. The docking had been scheduled for 0530 GMT but a live broadcast of the event on the website of the Russian space agency Roscosmos was interrupted when the Soyuz approached to about 100 metres (yards) off the ISS.


Russian humanoid robot 'pilot' rocket fails to dock at space station

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A humanoid robot sent by Russia's Vladimir Putin to the International Space Station (ISS) has failed to dock. A live stream of the six-foot Fedor robot - strapped in the pilot seat of the Soyuz spacecraft while wielding a Russia's white, blue and red flag - had to be interrupted with the humanoid still 100 meters away, news agency AFP reported. Fedor, an artificially intelligent robot known officially as Skybot F-850, was on an automated and unmanned mission to the space station, where he is supposed to help out crews for ten days. He is said to be the first humanoid sent to space by Russia. Having failed its landing at 05:30 BST on Saturday, Fedor will now have to wait until Monday to try reaching the ISS again.


Russian humanoid robot 'pilot' rocket fails to dock at space station

#artificialintelligence

A humanoid robot sent by Russia's Vladimir Putin to the International Space Station (ISS) has failed to dock. A live stream of the six-foot Fedor robot - strapped in the pilot seat of the Soyuz spacecraft while wielding a Russia's white, blue and red flag - had to be interrupted with the humanoid still 100 meters away, news agency AFP reported. Fedor, an artificially intelligent robot known officially as Skybot F-850, was on an automated and unmanned mission to the space station, where he is supposed to help out crews for ten days. He is said to be the first humanoid sent to space by Russia. Having failed its landing at 05:30 BST on Saturday, Fedor will now have to wait until Monday to try reaching the ISS again.


Docking of unmanned Soyuz spacecraft carrying Russia's first humanoid robot to ISS is aborted

The Japan Times

MOSCOW – In a new setback for Moscow, an unmanned spacecraft carrying Russia's first humanoid robot to be sent into orbit failed to dock automatically at the International Space Station on Saturday. "Russian cosmonauts issued a command to abort the automated approach of an uncrewed Russian Soyuz spacecraft to the International Space Station," the U.S. space agency NASA said in a statement. "The craft was unable to lock onto its target at the station," and "backed a safe distance away from the orbital complex while the Russian flight controllers assess the next steps," NASA said. Russian flight controllers had told the ISS crew it appeared the problem that prevented automated docking was in the station and not the Soyuz spacecraft, NASA added. Moscow news agencies quoted the flight center control as saying the Soyuz craft had to retreat to a "secure distance" from the ISS.


Russia blasts futuristic humanoid robot into orbit to complete 'hazardous' space tasks

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Fedor, which is travelling to the orbital outpost aboard the Soyuz MS-14 spacecraft, was created by Russia's Android Technology Company and the Advanced Research Fund on a technical assignment from Moscow's Emergencies Ministry. Its basic goals include transmitting telemetry data, determining parameters related to the flight safety, including overloads, and carrying out experiments to test the Skybot's operations capabilities on spacewalks outside the ISS. A Soyuz-2.1a carrier rocket blasted off from the Gagarin Start launch pad of the Baikonur spaceport in Kazakhstan yesterday delivering the Soyuz MS-14 spacecraft with Fedor into the near-Earth orbit.


First humanoid Russian robot, Fedor, flies to International Space Station

The Japan Times

MOSCOW – Russia on Thursday launched an unmanned rocket carrying a life-size humanoid robot that will spend 10 days learning to assist astronauts on the International Space Station. Named Fedor, for Final Experimental Demonstration Object Research with identification number Skybot F850, the robot is the first ever sent up by Russia. Fedor blasted off in a Soyuz MS-14 spacecraft at 6:38 a.m. The Soyuz is set to dock with the space station on Saturday and stay till Sept. 7. Soyuz ships are normally manned on such trips, but on Thursday no humans are traveling in order to test a new emergency rescue system. Instead of cosmonauts, Fedor was strapped into a specially adapted pilot's seat, with a small Russian flag in his hand.


Russia is about to send a humanoid AI robot to the International Space Station

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Russia's space agency Roscosmos is about to send a humanoid robot to the International Space Station. Skybot F-850 will be sent to the ISS on August 22 on board the Soyuz MS-14 spacecraft, and will spend over two weeks there before returning to Earth on September 7. The robot, also known as Fedor, made headlines in 2017 when Dmitry Rogozin, director general of Roscosmos, shared a video of it shooting guns. Shortly after he clarified they "are not creating a Terminator, but artificial intelligence that will be of great practical significance in various fields." Fedor was created to replicate the movement of a remote operator.