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15 Amazing and Weird Technologies That'll Change the World in the Next Few Decades

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Let's go back to a simpler time. It is the early or late 90s. You are eight years old, waking up early to catch the latest action-filled episodes of your Saturday morning cartoons; TV shows that portray what technology may look like in the future. In Japan, popular anime shows like Outlaw Star, Mobile Suit Gundam, and Cowboy Bebop. These shows would pull viewers in, giving us a taste of the future for breakfast. They would show us worlds where humans and cyborgs were almost unidentifiable from each other, where trips to space were as simple as catching a bus, or where artificial intelligence and robotics were used to better humanity (and used for epic battles in space).


Study examines robotic exoskeletons and bodily fit

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A shoddily tailored suit or a shrunken T-shirt may not be the most stylish, but wearing them is unlikely to hurt more than your reputation. An ill-fitting robotic exoskeleton on the battlefield or factory floor, however, could be a much bigger problem than a fashion faux pas. Exoskeletons, many of which are powered by springs or motors, can cause pain or injury if their joints are not aligned with the user's. To help manufacturers and consumers mitigate these risks, researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) developed a new measurement method to test whether an exoskeleton and the person wearing it are moving smoothly and in harmony. In a new report, the researchers describe an optical tracking system (OTS) not unlike the motion capture techniques used by filmmakers to bring computer-generated characters to life.


US Marines to get 'Alpha' exoskeleton for super strength

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The Marines are about to get their hands on an impressive bit of hardware: A wearable robotic exoskeleton that gives users super strength. The company delivering the unit, a defense-focused subsidiary of Sarcos Robotics developed the exoskeleton for industrial uses, including in energy and construction. An executive guide to the technology and market drivers behind the $135 billion robotics market. Still, in many ways, this is a return to roots for Sarcos. In 2000, the company was part of a storied class of DARPA grant recipients working on powered exoskeletons for defense purposes.


Wearable robot company marches to big raise

ZDNet

There's are two reasons I've written glowingly about a Utah-based robotics company called Sarcos, which just locked in an additional $40M in Series C funding. The first is the company's pragmatic approach to becoming a key automation supplier in the near-term. While some vendors are making automation solutions aimed squarely at solving current pain points (collaborative robots, which can be slotted into a light manufacturing line, are a good example), and while others are looking toward a radical future when robots walk among us (take your pick from the spectrum of impressive but impractical personal assistant robots), Sarcos is looking to a near-future in which robots don't replace humans outright but instead augment the strength and endurance of increasingly smaller numbers of workers. It's a promising strategy, leveraging the best of what humans have to offer -- namely that wonderful piece of hardware called the brain -- while addressing the rising costs of labor and, at least before the pandemic, labor shortfalls in many sectors by squeezing more productivity out of fewer workers. The second reason I like Sarcos is they make robotic exoskeletons that give mere mortals superhuman strength.


A robotic exoskeleton for paraplegics – IAM Network

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Combining robotics with artificial intelligence (AI), an Indian health tech startup has developed an exoskeleton used as a robotic arm/leg for paraplegic patients.Arguably the first in the country, the indigenously designed device could be a potential alternative to the expensive products sourced from abroad.The startup, GenElek Technologies, was chosen to represent India at the Powered Exoskeleton Race at Cybathlon 2020 in Zurich before the Covid-19 outbreak forced a reschedule. Two former Indian Army paraplegic soldiers from the Paraplegic Rehabilitation Centre (PRC), Mohali, were to wear the robotic gear and compete with 17 other international teams.Exoskeletons (externally worn robotic support system) make it possible for people with neurological conditions such as paralysis, stroke and spinal cord injury to walk or move better. GenElek's model was to customise its design and tailor it to individual needs, the startup's founder John Ignatius Kujur told DH.So, how does it incorporate artificial intelligence? The data is collected in real time, interpreted and relayed by AI to the cloud. It gets processed in real time by a medical expert monitoring the patient's treatment.Not for amputeesThe device is not for amputees, John explained.


U.S. Marines to get "Alpha" exoskeleton for super strength

ZDNet

The Marines are about to get their hands on an impressive bit of hardware: a wearable robotic exoskeleton that gives users super strength. The company delivering the unit, a defense-focused subsidiary of Sarcos Robotics developed the exoskeleton for industrial uses, including in energy and construction. Still, in many ways this is a return to roots for Sarcos. In 2000, the company was part of a storied class of DARPA grant recipients working on powered exoskeletons for defense purposes. In many ways the XO, which conserves energy by remaining passive when not actuated, is the fulfillment of that research.


ServiceNow BrandVoice: AI Is The Brain's Exoskeleton

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But we humans are still smarter. We are now at a point with artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML) where we can use a new confluence of forces to increase human productivity and ingenuity. All the while, we must remember why we're using these new tools and how they can help us work smarter and faster. If you saw the movie Aliens, you might remember the iconic image of Ripley encased in a mechanical exoskeleton, ready to take on the deadly alien queen. AI's impact on human intelligence is akin to a mechanical exoskeleton on the human body.


ServiceNow BrandVoice: AI Is The Brain's Exoskeleton

#artificialintelligence

But we humans are still smarter. We are now at a point with artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML) where we can use a new confluence of forces to increase human productivity and ingenuity. All the while, we must remember why we're using these new tools and how they can help us work smarter and faster. If you saw the movie Aliens, you might remember the iconic image of Ripley encased in a mechanical exoskeleton, ready to take on the deadly alien queen. AI's impact on human intelligence is akin to a mechanical exoskeleton on the human body.


Good news for lazy joggers: Scientists develop ankle 'exoskeleton' that makes running easier

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Couch potatoes trying to get in shape could one day be helped along their fitness journey by an ankle exoskeleton that makes it easier and less tiring to run. The robotic device attaches to the ankle of joggers and was found in lab tests to slash energy expenditure by 14 per cent when compared to standard running shoes. It was created by robotics experts at Stanford University and funded in part by sporting behemoth Nike. The engineers behind the project say the equipment currently only works on a treadmill and when the device is hooked up to a machine via cables. However, they are working to make the exoskeleton portable and lightweight and easy to integrate into future running equipment.


Incredible moment a British Paralympian swimmer takes her first steps wearing a robotic exoskeleton

Daily Mail - Science & tech

Incredible footage shows the moment a British Paralympian swimmer with cerebral palsy stands up and takes her first steps wearing a robotic exoskeleton. Grace Harvey, 21, was able to take the special walk with the help of state-of-the-art technology developed in Japan -- giving her a day she will never forget. In the video, the swimmer from Ware, Hertfordshire, smiled nervously as she took her'first' tentative steps. She went on to giggle when a bystander said'You're running, Grace.' Swimmer Ms Harvey holds the European record for the 200 metre (656 feet) Individual Medley and is presently the British number one in the 100 metre (328 feet) backstroke event. She is currently training in the city of Suzuka, Japan, ahead of the 2020 Tokyo Paralympics in August.