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15 Amazing and Weird Technologies That'll Change the World in the Next Few Decades

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Let's go back to a simpler time. It is the early or late 90s. You are eight years old, waking up early to catch the latest action-filled episodes of your Saturday morning cartoons; TV shows that portray what technology may look like in the future. In Japan, popular anime shows like Outlaw Star, Mobile Suit Gundam, and Cowboy Bebop. These shows would pull viewers in, giving us a taste of the future for breakfast. They would show us worlds where humans and cyborgs were almost unidentifiable from each other, where trips to space were as simple as catching a bus, or where artificial intelligence and robotics were used to better humanity (and used for epic battles in space).


Machine learning and Doppler vibrometer monitor household appliances – Physics World

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A way of monitoring household appliances by using machine learning to analyse vibrations on a wall or ceiling has been developed by researchers in the US. Their system could be used to create centralized smart home systems without the need for individual sensors in each object. What is more, the technology could help track energy use, identify electrical faults and even remind people to empty the dishwasher. "Recognizing home activities can help computers better understand human behaviours and needs, with the hope of developing a better human-machine interface," says team member and information scientist Cheng Zhang of Cornell University. The system, dubbed VibroSense, comprises two core parts: a laser Doppler vibrometer and a deep learning model, which is a type of machine learning system.


New AI Paradigm May Reduce a Heavy Carbon Footprint

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Artificial intelligence (AI) machine learning can have a considerable carbon footprint. Deep learning is inherently costly, as it requires massive computational and energy resources. Now researchers in the U.K. have discovered how to create an energy-efficient artificial neural network without sacrificing accuracy and published the findings in Nature Communications on August 26, 2020. The biological brain is the inspiration for neuromorphic computing--an interdisciplinary approach that draws upon neuroscience, physics, artificial intelligence, computer science, and electrical engineering to create artificial neural systems that mimic biological functions and systems. The human brain is a complex system of roughly 86 billion neurons, 200 billion neurons, and hundreds of trillions of synapses.


7 innovative trends in lifts & elevators that will surprise you

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Elevators and lifts have been in use for a long time now. After years of advancements and evolutions, today's elevators and lifts are extremely modernized and innovative. Elevator cars, freight elevators, and passenger elevators can be commonly seen in almost every commercial building. The use of lifts and elevators has greatly increased in the past few years. They reduce the time of travel and make movement effortless. The lift designs are lavish and functional.


Microsoft And Shell Announce New Partnership To Use Artificial Intelligence And Tech To Reduce Carbon Emissions

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Tackling carbon emissions is one of the biggest challenges faced by the world today. For big business, this means making a strategic and managed move towards increasing the use of renewable energy sources, as well as creating efficiencies across all aspects of their operations. It's a difficult task to manage alone, even for an enterprise on the scale of tech giant Microsoft or energy titan Shell. But working together creates new possibilities that go further than what it is likely they could accomplish individually. Beyond meeting their own zero-carbon commitments, there's the opportunity to help other companies within their vast ecosystems of customers and suppliers to meet their environmental and safety goals, too.


Data Digest: Innovative Applications for Machine Learning

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How machine learning and AI are being used to cut emissions, picture the past, and study DNA. This company claims their AI platform can cut carbon dioxide emissions by improving buildings' efficiency. Read how an artist used machine learning to extrapolate realistic portraits of ancient Roman emperors. Researchers at the University of California San Diego have used machine learning to solve a long-standing question about gene activation in humans.


Microsoft And Shell Announce New Partnership To Use Artificial Intelligence And Tech To Reduce Carbon Emissions

#artificialintelligence

Tackling carbon emissions is one of the biggest challenges faced by the world today. For big business, this means making a strategic and managed move towards increasing the use of renewable energy sources, as well as creating efficiencies across all aspects of their operations. It's a difficult task to manage alone, even for an enterprise on the scale of tech giant Microsoft or energy titan Shell. But working together creates new possibilities that go further than what it is likely they could accomplish individually. Beyond meeting their own zero-carbon commitments, there's the opportunity to help other companies within their vast ecosystems of customers and suppliers to meet their environmental and safety goals, too.


Sizing up a green carbon sink

Science

Forests are having their moment. Because trees can vacuum carbon from the atmosphere and lock it away in wood, governments and businesses are embracing efforts to fight climate change by reforesting cleared areas and planting trees on a massive scale. But scientists have warned that the enthusiasm and money flowing to forest-based climate solutions threaten to outpace the science. Two papers published this week seek to put such efforts on a firmer footing. One study quantifies how much carbon might be absorbed globally by allowing forests cleared for farming or other purposes to regrow. The other calculates how much carbon could be sequestered by forests in the United States if they were fully “stocked” with newly planted trees. Each strategy has promise, the studies suggest, but also faces perils. To get a worldwide perspective on the potential of second-growth forests, an international team led by ecologist Susan Cook-Patton of the Nature Conservancy (TNC) assembled data from more than 13,000 previously deforested sites where researchers had measured regrowth rates of young trees. The team then trained a machine-learning algorithm on those data and dozens of variables, such as climate and soil type, to predict and map how fast trees could grow on other cleared sites where it didn't have data. > Can the forest regenerate naturally, or can we do something to help? > > Susan Cook-Patton , the Nature Conservancy A TNC-led team had previously calculated that some 678 million hectares, an area nearly the size of Australia, could support second-growth forests. (The total doesn't include land where trees might not be desirable, such as farmland and ecologically valuable grasslands.) If trees were allowed to take over that entire area, new forests could soak up one-quarter of the world's fossil fuel emissions over the next 30 years, Cook-Patton and colleagues report in Nature . That absorption rate is 32% higher than a previous estimate, based on coarser data, produced by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. But the total carbon drawdown is 11% lower than a TNC-led team estimated in 2017. The study highlights “what nature can do all on its own,” Cook-Patton says. And it represents “a lightning step forward” in precision compared with earlier studies, says geographer Matthew Fagan of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, who was not involved in the work. But, Fagan adds, “Natural regrowth is not going to save the planet.” One problem: There is often little economic incentive for private landowners to allow forests to bounce back. Under current policies and market pricing, “nobody will abandon cattle ranching or agriculture for growing carbon,” says Pedro Brancalion, a forest expert at the University of São Paulo in Piracicaba, Brazil. And even when forests get a second life, they often don't last long enough to store much carbon before being cleared again. Fagan notes that even in Costa Rica, renowned as a reforestation champion for doubling its forest cover in recent decades, studies have found that half of second-growth forests fall within 20 years. Given such realities, some advocates are pushing to expand tree planting in existing forests. To boost that concept, a team of researchers at the U.S. Forest Service (USFS) quantified how many additional trees U.S. forests could hold. Drawing on a federal inventory, they found that more than 16% of forests in the continental United States are “understocked”—holding fewer than 35% of the trees they could support. Fully stocking these 33 million hectares of forest would ultimately enable U.S. forests to sequester about 18% of national carbon emissions each year, up from 15% today, the team reports in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences . But for that to happen, the United States would have to “massively” expand its annual tree-planting efforts, from about 1 billion to 16 billion trees, says lead author Grant Domke, a USFS research forester in St. Paul, Minnesota. Cook-Patton says planting trees might make sense in some places, but natural regeneration, where possible, provides more bang for the buck. “For any given site,” she says, “we should always ask ourselves first: ‘Can the forest regenerate naturally, or can we do something to help?’”


How ensembles can reduce machine learning's carbon footprint - Dataconomy

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Commercial and industrial applications of artificial intelligence and machine learning are unlocking economic opportunities, transforming the way we do business, and even helping to solve complex social and environmental problems. In fact, generative applications of this technology have become tools for environmental sustainability. With machine learning's capability to analyze and make predictions using massive pools of data, these applications are now able to accurately model climate change and fluctuations, so that energy infrastructures and energy consumption can be re-engineered accordingly. Ironically, training large-scale models via deep neural networks requires vast computational power. It also produces a great deal of thermal energy from each of the associated graphics processing units (GPUs) or tensor processing units (TPUs) used.


Amazon's climate pledge: New program makes it easier to shop for sustainable products

USATODAY - Tech Top Stories

Amazon launched a new program to help make it easier for customers to discover and shop for more sustainable products. Amazon now has a page dedicated to products with a Climate Pledge Friendly label, according to a statement by the company, signifying they meet sustainability standards that help preserve the natural world. Customers can browse through over 25,000 products with one or more sustainability certifications. Product categories include grocery, apparel, beauty, computers, electronics, among others. As part of Amazon's Climate Pledge Friendly program, the retail giant is also launching Compact by Design, an externally-validated certification that identifies products without excess air and water and products that require less packaging and become more efficient to ship.