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Tu, Stephen


Finite-time Analysis of Approximate Policy Iteration for the Linear Quadratic Regulator

Neural Information Processing Systems

We study the sample complexity of approximate policy iteration (PI) for the Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR), building on a recent line of work using LQR as a testbed to understand the limits of reinforcement learning (RL) algorithms on continuous control tasks. Our analysis quantifies the tension between policy improvement and policy evaluation, and suggests that policy evaluation is the dominant factor in terms of sample complexity. Specifically, we show that to obtain a controller that is within $\varepsilon$ of the optimal LQR controller, each step of policy evaluation requires at most $(n d) 3/\varepsilon 2$ samples, where $n$ is the dimension of the state vector and $d$ is the dimension of the input vector. On the other hand, only $\log(1/\varepsilon)$ policy improvement steps suffice, resulting in an overall sample complexity of $(n d) 3 \varepsilon {-2} \log(1/\varepsilon)$. We furthermore build on our analysis and construct a simple adaptive procedure based on $\varepsilon$-greedy exploration which relies on approximate PI as a sub-routine and obtains $T {2/3}$ regret, improving upon a recent result of Abbasi-Yadkori et al. 2019.


Regret Bounds for Robust Adaptive Control of the Linear Quadratic Regulator

Neural Information Processing Systems

We consider adaptive control of the Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR), where an unknown linear system is controlled subject to quadratic costs. Leveraging recent developments in the estimation of linear systems and in robust controller synthesis, we present the first provably polynomial time algorithm that achieves sub-linear regret on this problem. We further study the interplay between regret minimization and parameter estimation by proving a lower bound on the expected regret in terms of the exploration schedule used by any algorithm. Finally, we conduct a numerical study comparing our robust adaptive algorithm to other methods from the adaptive LQR literature, and demonstrate the flexibility of our proposed method by extending it to a demand forecasting problem subject to state constraints. Papers published at the Neural Information Processing Systems Conference.


Cyclades: Conflict-free Asynchronous Machine Learning

Neural Information Processing Systems

We present Cyclades, a general framework for parallelizing stochastic optimization algorithms in a shared memory setting. Cyclades is asynchronous during model updates, and requires no memory locking mechanisms, similar to Hogwild!-type algorithms. Unlike Hogwild!, Cyclades introduces no conflicts during parallel execution, and offers a black-box analysis for provable speedups across a large family of algorithms. Due to its inherent cache locality and conflict-free nature, our multi-core implementation of Cyclades consistently outperforms Hogwild!-type algorithms on sufficiently sparse datasets, leading to up to 40% speedup gains compared to Hogwild!, and up to 5\times gains over asynchronous implementations of variance reduction algorithms. Papers published at the Neural Information Processing Systems Conference.


Observational Overfitting in Reinforcement Learning

arXiv.org Artificial Intelligence

A major component of overfitting in model-free reinforcement learning (RL) involves the case where the agent may mistakenly correlate reward with certain spurious features from the observations generated by the Markov Decision Process (MDP). We provide a general framework for analyzing this scenario, which we use to design multiple synthetic benchmarks from only modifying the observation space of an MDP. When an agent overfits to different observation spaces even if the underlying MDP dynamics is fixed, we term this observational overfitting. Our experiments expose intriguing properties especially with regards to implicit regularization, and also corroborate results from previous works in RL generalization and supervised learning (SL).


A Tutorial on Concentration Bounds for System Identification

arXiv.org Machine Learning

We provide a brief tutorial on the use of concentration inequalities as they apply to system identification of state-space parameters of linear time invariant systems, with a focus on the fully observed setting. We draw upon tools from the theories of large-deviations and self-normalized martingales, and provide both data-dependent and independent bounds on the learning rate. I. INTRODUCTION A key feature in modern reinforcement learning is the ability to provide high-probability guarantees on the finite-data/time behavior of an algorithm acting on a system. The enabling technical tools used in providing such guarantees are concentration of measure results, which should be interpreted as quantitative versions of the strong law of large numbers. This paper provides a brief introduction to such tools, as motivated by the identification of linear-time-invariant (LTI) systems.


From self-tuning regulators to reinforcement learning and back again

arXiv.org Machine Learning

Machine and reinforcement learning (RL) are being applied to plan and control the behavior of autonomous systems interacting with the physical world -- examples include self-driving vehicles, distributed sensor networks, and agile robots. However, if machine learning is to be applied in these new settings, the resulting algorithms must come with the reliability, robustness, and safety guarantees that are hallmarks of the control theory literature, as failures could be catastrophic. Thus, as RL algorithms are increasingly and more aggressively deployed in safety critical settings, it is imperative that control theorists be part of the conversation. The goal of this tutorial paper is to provide a jumping off point for control theorists wishing to work on RL related problems by covering recent advances in bridging learning and control theory, and by placing these results within the appropriate historical context of the system identification and adaptive control literatures.


Finite-time Analysis of Approximate Policy Iteration for the Linear Quadratic Regulator

arXiv.org Machine Learning

We study the sample complexity of approximate policy iteration (PI) for the Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR), building on a recent line of work using LQR as a testbed to understand the limits of reinforcement learning (RL) algorithms on continuous control tasks. Our analysis quantifies the tension between policy improvement and policy evaluation, and suggests that policy evaluation is the dominant factor in terms of sample complexity. Specifically, we show that to obtain a controller that is within $\varepsilon$ of the optimal LQR controller, each step of policy evaluation requires at most $(n+d)^3/\varepsilon^2$ samples, where $n$ is the dimension of the state vector and $d$ is the dimension of the input vector. On the other hand, only $\log(1/\varepsilon)$ policy improvement steps suffice, resulting in an overall sample complexity of $(n+d)^3 \varepsilon^{-2} \log(1/\varepsilon)$. We furthermore build on our analysis and construct a simple adaptive procedure based on $\varepsilon$-greedy exploration which relies on approximate PI as a sub-routine and obtains $T^{2/3}$ regret, improving upon a recent result of Abbasi-Yadkori et al.


Certainty Equivalent Control of LQR is Efficient

arXiv.org Machine Learning

One of the most straightforward methods for controlling a dynamical system with unknown transitions isbased on the certainty equivalence principle: a model of the system is fit by observing its time evolution, and a control policy is then designed by treating the fitted model as the truth [8]. Despite the simplicity of this method, it is challenging to guarantee its efficiency because small modeling errors may propagate to large, undesirable behaviors on long time horizons. As a result, most work on controlling systems with unknown dynamics has explicitly incorporated robustness against model uncertainty [11, 12, 20, 25, 35, 36]. In this work, we show that for the standard baseline of controlling an unknown linear dynamical system with a quadratic objective function, known as the Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR), certainty equivalent control synthesis achieves better cost than prior methods that account for model uncertainty. In the case of offline control, where one collects some data and then designs a fixed control policy to be run on an infinite time horizon, we show that the gap between the performance of the certainty equivalent controller and the optimal control policy scales quadratically with the error in the model parameters.


Regret Bounds for Robust Adaptive Control of the Linear Quadratic Regulator

Neural Information Processing Systems

We consider adaptive control of the Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR), where an unknown linear system is controlled subject to quadratic costs. Leveraging recent developments in the estimation of linear systems and in robust controller synthesis, we present the first provably polynomial time algorithm that provides high probability guarantees of sub-linear regret on this problem. We further study the interplay between regret minimization and parameter estimation by proving a lower bound on the expected regret in terms of the exploration schedule used by any algorithm. Finally, we conduct a numerical study comparing our robust adaptive algorithm to other methods from the adaptive LQR literature, and demonstrate the flexibility of our proposed method by extending it to a demand forecasting problem subject to state constraints.


Regret Bounds for Robust Adaptive Control of the Linear Quadratic Regulator

Neural Information Processing Systems

We consider adaptive control of the Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR), where an unknown linear system is controlled subject to quadratic costs. Leveraging recent developments in the estimation of linear systems and in robust controller synthesis, we present the first provably polynomial time algorithm that provides high probability guarantees of sub-linear regret on this problem. We further study the interplay between regret minimization and parameter estimation by proving a lower bound on the expected regret in terms of the exploration schedule used by any algorithm. Finally, we conduct a numerical study comparing our robust adaptive algorithm to other methods from the adaptive LQR literature, and demonstrate the flexibility of our proposed method by extending it to a demand forecasting problem subject to state constraints.