Traum, David


Virtual Humans for Learning

AI Magazine

Virtual humans are computer-generated characters designed to look and behave like real people. Studies have shown that virtual humans can mimic many of the social effects that one finds in human-human interactions such as creating rapport, and people respond to virtual humans in ways that are similar to how they respond to real people. We believe that virtual humans represent a new metaphor for interacting with computers, one in which working with a computer becomes much like interacting with a person and this can bring social elements to the interaction that are not easily supported with conventional interfaces. The second SimCoach, uses an empathetic virtual human to provide veterans and their families with information about PTSD and depression.


Toward Virtual Humans

AI Magazine

This article describes the virtual humans developed as part of the Mission Rehearsal Exercise project, a virtual reality-based training system. This project is an ambitious exercise in integration, both in the sense of integrating technology with entertainment industry content, but also in that we have joined a number of component technologies that have not been integrated before. This integration has not only raised new research issues, but it has also suggested some new approaches to difficult problems. We describe the key capabilities of the virtual humans, including task representation and reasoning, natural language dialogue, and emotion reasoning, and show how these capabilities are integrated to provide more human-level intelligence than would otherwise be possible.


Reports on the AAAI Fall Symposia (November 1999 and November 1998)

AI Magazine

The 1999 Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence Fall Symposium Series was held Friday through Sunday, 5-7 November 1999, at the Sea Crest Oceanfront Resort and Conference Center. The titles of the five symposia were (1) Modal and Temporal Logics-Based Planning for Open Networked Multimedia Systems; (2) Narrative Intelligence; (3) Psychological Models of Communication in Collaborative Systems; (4) Question-Answering Systems; and (5) Using Layout for the Generation, Understanding, or Retrieval of Documents.


The 1997 AAAI Fall Symposia

AI Magazine

The Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence held its 1997 Fall Symposia Series on 7 to 9 November in Cambridge, Massachusetts. This article contains summaries of the six symposia that were conducted: (1) Communicative Action in Humans and Machines, (2) Context in Knowledge Representation and Natural Language, (3) Intelligent Tutoring System Authoring Tools, (4) Model-Directed Autonomous Systems, (5) Reasoning with Diagrammatic Representations II, and (6) Socially Intelligent Agents.