Pearl, J.


Tree clustering for constraint networks

Classics

The method involves the formation and preprocessing of an acyclic database that permits a large variety of queries and local perturbations to be processed swiftly, either by sequential backtrack-free procedures, or by distributed constraint propagation processes.



Network-based heuristics for constraint-satisfaction problems

Classics

While some CSPs are hard, those that are easy can often be mapped into sparse networks of constraints which, in the extreme case, are trees. This paper identifies classes of problems that lend themselves to easy solutions, and develops algorithms that solve these problems optimally. The paper then presents a method of generating heuristic advice to guide the order of value assignments based on both the sparseness found in the constraint network and the simplicity of tree-structured CSPs. The advice is generated by simplifying the pending subproblems into trees, counting the number of consistent solutions in each simplified subproblem, and comparing these counts to decide among the choices pending in the original problem.


Evidential reasoning using stochastic simulation of causal models

Classics

Stochastic simulation is a method of computing probabilities by recording the fraction of time that events occur in a random series of scenarios generated from some causal model. This paper presents an efficient, concurrent method of conducting the simulation which guarantees that all generated scenarios will be consistent with the observed data. It is shown that the simulation can be performed by purely local computations, involving products of parameters given with the initial specification of the model. Thus, the method proposed renders stochastic simulation a powerful technique of coherent inferencing, especially suited for tasks involving complex, nondecomposable models where "ballpark" estimates of probabilities will suffice.


Fusion, propagation, and structuring in belief networks

Classics

Belief networks are directed acyclic graphs in which the nodes represent propositions (or variables), the arcs signify direct dependencies between the linked propositions, and the strengths of these dependencies are quantified by conditional probabilities. The first part of the paper deals with the task of fusing and propagating the impacts of new information through the networks in such a way that, when equilibrium is reached, each proposition will be assigned a measure of belief consistent with the axioms of probability theory. The second part of the paper deals with the problem of finding a tree-structured representation for a collection of probabilistically coupled propositions using auxiliary (dummy) variables, colloquially called "hidden causes." It is shown that if such a tree-structured representation exists, then it is possible to uniquely uncover the topology of the tree by observing pairwise dependencies among the available propositions (i.e., the leaves of the tree).